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U.S. Geological Survey,

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Discharge data were computed for a network of water-quality monitoring stations operated by the Arkansas Department of Pollution Control and Ecology. Some of the sites are located at U.S. Geological Survey or U.S. Army Corps of Engineers daily-discharge stations, but most are at points where discharges are not measured regularly. (Woodard-USGS)
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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Lake Rousseau, about 4 miles southwest of Inglis, Florida, was formed in 1909 by impoundment of the Withlacooche River by Inglis Dam, west of Dunnellon, Florida. The lake was to have been part of the Cross-Florida Barge Canal; a lock and channel associated with the presently inactive project were completed in 1969. Lake Rousseau is about 11 miles long, covers about 4,000 acres, and contains about 34,000 acre-feet of water at the normal pool elevation of 27.5 feet above mean sea level. Inflow to the lake is relatively constant and responds slowly to rainfall. The estimated 100-year peak inflow, 10,400 cubic feet per second, is only 19 percent higher than the 100-year high monthly inflow. Water in Lake Rousseau is...
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The Najd fault system is a major transcurrent (strike-slip) fault system of Proterozoic age in the Arabian Shield. The system is a braided complex of parallel and curved en echelon faults. Complex arrays of secondary structures including strike-slip, oblique-slip, thrust, and normal faults, together with folds and dike swarms, are associated with some major faults, particularly near their terminations. The secondary structures indicate that compressional and extensional and dilational conditions existed synchronously in different parts of the fault zone. The outcrop traces of faults and syntectonic dikes have been used to interpret the configuration of principal compressive stresses during formation of parts of...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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