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W.H. Langer

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Six regions in the Basin and Range province, ranging in size from 21,600 to 80,000 square kilometers, were evaluated to identify prospective hydrogeologic environments for isolation of high-level radioactive waste. Prospective hydrogeologic environments were evaluated on the basis of the surface distribution of potential host rocks, late Cenozoic tectonic activity, hydrogeologic characteristics, and mineral and energy resources. These regions were selected as prospective for this study from a screening of the Basin and Range province. The six regions have certain characteristics that appear favorable for isolation of radioactive waste. The scant precipitation and great potential for water loss by evaporation and...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Professional Paper
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Sustaining a developed economy and expanding a developing one require the use of large volumes of natural aggregate. Almost all human activity (commercial, recreational, or leisure) is transacted in or on facilities constructed from natural aggregate. In our urban and suburban worlds, we are almost totally dependent on supplies of water collected behind dams and transported through aqueducts made from concrete. Natural aggregate is essential to the facilities that produce energy-hydroelectric dams and coal-fired powerplants. Ironically, the utility created for mankind by the use of natural aggregate is rarely compared favorably with the environmental impacts of mining it. Instead, the empty quarries and pits are...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Natural Resources Research
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An enterprising operator finds a solution to a geologic problem that had been in the making for 1.4 million years.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Aggregates Manager
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A gravel pit that was a source of happy childhood memories showcases the evolution of mining technology.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Aggregates Manager
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