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Water

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(Hyperlink to Official Landing Page for Geospatial Fabric products) The Geospatial Fabric provides a consistent, documented, and topologically connected set of spatial features that create an abstracted stream/basin network of features useful for hydrologic modeling.The GIS vector features contained in this Geospatial Fabric (GF) data set cover the lower 48 U.S. states, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico. Four GIS feature classes are provided for each Region: 1) the Region outline ("one"), 2) Points of Interest ("POIs"), 3) a routing network ("nsegment"), and 4) Hydrologic Response Units ("nhru"). A graphic showing the boundaries for all Regions is provided at http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.5066/F7542KMD. These Regions are identical...
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Groundwater-quality data collected between 1993 and 2015 were compiled from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Information System (NWIS) database for 722 wells in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). Groundwater-quality data retrieved included lab analyses of complete major ion data (calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride, sulfate, nitrate, alkalinity, bicarbonate, carbonate, silica, and TDS) for 613 samples, and an additional 109 samples with measured values of specific conductance. Most of these wells were sampled as part of the California Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program Priority Basin Project or the USGS National Water Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program. In addition...
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This USGS Data Release supports USGS Scientific Investigations Report (SIR) 2017-5079. Following is the abstract from SIR 2017-5079: This report documents methodology and results of a study to evaluate groundwater discharge by evapotranspiration (GWET) in sparsely vegetated areas of Amargosa Desert and improve understanding of hydrologic-continuum processes controlling groundwater discharge. Evapotranspiration and GWET rates were computed and characterized at three sites over 2 years using a combination of micrometeorological, unsaturated zone, and stable-isotope measurements. One site (Amargosa Flat Shallow [AFS]) was in a sparse and isolated area of saltgrass (Distichlis spicata) where the depth to groundwater...
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This data release supports the following publication: Hittle, Elizabeth, 2017, Longshore water-current velocity and the potential for transport of contaminants: A pilot study in Lake Erie from Walnut Creek to Presque Isle State Park Beaches, Erie, Pennsylvania, June and August 2015: U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2016–1206 126 p., https://doi.org/10.3133/ofr20161206 Water-quality grab samples were collected about a meter from shore and coincide with the 25 longshore water-current velocity transects as closely as conditions would allow. Nearshore water-quality grab samples were collected on June 24, August 11, and August 19, 2015. Samples were analyzed for bacteria concentration, temperature, specific condictivity,...
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The occurrence of metals, such as lead and copper, in household drinking supplies can often be a result of the corrosion of pipes and joints in water distribution systems. One measure of the potential for water to cause corrosion is the Langelier Saturation Index (LSI) (Langelier, 1936). The LSI is a measure of the potential for water to deposit a mineral layer (scale) within a water distribution system that can inhibit the corrosion of pipes and joints. Negative values of LSI suggest mineral deposition is not likely to occur while positive values indicate conditions favorable to mineral deposition. Negative values of LSI might be indicative of conditions that lead to elevated concentrations of metals, such as lead...
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