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Wildlife Conservation Society

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The Gunnison Climate Working Group is a chartered partnership of 14 public and private organizations in Colorados Upper Gunnison Basin. The Southern Rockies LCC (SRLCC) funded The Nature Conservancy to complete a comprehensive vulnerability assessment identifying species and ecosystems most at risk from climate change. The assessment included a set of habitat adaptation strategies for priority species, such as the Gunnison sage-grouse. As a final product, local demonstration projects were designed and installed.The financial support and partnership provided by the SRLCC was critical to the Gunnison Climate Working Groups success and progress towards addressing climate change. As a direct result of the SRLCC involvement,...
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The Gunnison Climate Working Group is a chartered partnership of 14 public and private organizations in Colorados Upper Gunnison Basin. The Southern Rockies LCC (SRLCC) funded The Nature Conservancy to complete a comprehensive vulnerability assessment identifying species and ecosystems most at risk from climate change. The assessment included a set of habitat adaptation strategies for priority species, such as the Gunnison sage-grouse. As a final product, local demonstration projects were designed and installed.The financial support and partnership provided by the SRLCC was critical to the Gunnison Climate Working Groups success and progress towards addressing climate change. As a direct result of the SRLCC involvement,...
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The Pectoral Sandpiper is one of the most abundant breeding birds on the Arctic Coastal Plain ofAlaska. They typically have low nest site fidelity which is likely related to their promiscuousmating strategy, thus nest densities are highly variable from year to year at a given site (Holmesand Pitelka 1998). In Arctic Alaska, primary breeding habitat includes low-lying ponds in a mixof marshy to hummocky tundra and nests are typically placed in slightly raised or better drainedsites (Holmes and Pitelka 1998). Pectoral Sandpipers spend their winters primarily in southernSouth America (Holmes and Pitelka 1998). The current North American population estimate is500,000 and they are believed to be declining (Morrison et...
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The Red-necked Phalarope commonly breeds in both the Brooks Range foothills and ArcticCoastal Plain of Alaska. In Alaska, this species typically nests in wet tundra near water’s edge.It differs from the Red Phalarope in that it breeds further inland and at higher elevations (Rubegaet al. 2000). Like other phalaropes, this species depends on aquatic food sources for much of itsdiet (Rubega et al. 2000). Red-necked Phalaropes spend winter at sea in tropical waters in largenumbers off the west coast of South America (Rubega et al. 2000). Current North Americanpopulation estimate is 2.5 million with a declining trend (Morrison et al. 2006).
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The Gyrfalcon, the largest falcon, is an iconic bird of the circumpolar arctic and subarctic. Thisspecies nests primarily on precipitous cliff faces and typically utilizes nests built by other species(particularly Common Raven, Golden Eagle, and Rough-legged Hawk) (Booms et al. 2008).Gyrfalcon main prey includes bird species ranging in size from passerines to geese whileptarmigan are the preferred prey. Although not well documented, in winter this species movessouth throughout Canada and sometimes into the northern lower 48. Current population on theNorth Slope (tundrius subspecies) is estimated at 250 breeding pairs (USFWS 2000).
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