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William C. Evans

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Diffuse CO2 efflux near the Ukinrek Maars, two small volcanic craters that formed in 1977 in a remote part of the Alaska Peninsula, was investigated using accumulation chamber measurements. High CO2 efflux, in many places exceeding 1000 g m-2 d-1, was found in conspicuous zones of plant damage or kill that cover 30,000-50,000 m2 in area. Total diffuse CO2 emission was estimated at 21-44 t d-1. Gas vents 3-km away at The Gas Rocks produce 0.5 t d-1 of CO2 that probably derives from the Ukinrek Maars basalt based on similar ??13C values (???-6???), 3He/4He ratios (5.9-7.2 RA), and CO2/3He ratios (1-2 ?? 109) in the two areas. A lower 3He/4He ratio (2.7 RA) and much higher CO2/3He ratio (9 ?? 1010) in gas from the...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Applied Geochemistry
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Water level, temperature, salinity, electric conductivity, and pH have been measured periodically for several years at three water wells located along a 17km segment of the San Andreas fault between San Juan Bautista and Cienega Winery in central California. Water samples were collected at the same time for subsequent chemical analyses in the laboratory. Some sudden large changes in salinity and conductivity were recorded in early March 1980 at the two wells near San Juan Bautista. These changes coincided approximately with the beginning of an episode of increased local seismicity, including a magnitude 4.8 earthquake on April 13. Analyses of water samples revealed corresponding changes in ion concentrations, especially...
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We identified natural pits associated with avian mortality at the base of Kiska Volcano in the western Aleutian Islands, Alaska in 2007. Living, moribund, and dead birds were regularly found at low spots in a canyon between two lava flows during 2001–2006, but the phenomenon was attributed to natural trapping and starvation of fledgling seabirds (mostly Least Auklets, Aethia pusilla) at a colony site with >1 million birds present. However, 302 birds of eight species, including passerines, were found dead at the site during 2007–2010, suggesting additional factors were involved. Most carcasses showed no signs of injury and concentrations of dead birds had accumulated in a few distinctive low pits in the canyon. Gas...
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Fluid and heat discharge rates of thermal springs of the Cascade Range have been determined using the chloride inventory method. Discharge rates of thermal spring groups range from 1 to 120 L s−1. Most of the fluid (50%) and heat (61%) are discharged from two hot spring groups in northern Oregon. Total discharge from thermal springs in the Cascade Range of California, Oregon, and Washington is about 340 Ls−1, which corresponds to about 8.2×104 kJ s−1 of heat. This does not include hot springs developed on the flanks of Mount St. Helens after the 1980 eruption. The Cascade Range consists of geologically and technically distinct segments; rates of convective heat discharge by the thermal springs in these segments...
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Six natural gas manifestions from the upper Tiber Valley at Caprese Michelangela and Pieve S. Stefano (Arezzo) and at Umbertide (Pertugia) localities have been analysed for major, minor, trace gas compositions, as well as for ??13C in CO2 and CH4, ??15N in N2 and 3He/4He isotopic ratios. All gas emissions are CO2-rich (???94%), with N2 contents of 4-5%. Those from Caprese and Pieve S. Stefano have very peculiar compsitions when compared to other gases from northern-central Apennines. Apart from CO2, these gases show relatively high contents of He (with crustal isotopic ratios) and medium to high temperature-related gases such as CO, H2 and C6H6. Although located quite far from the geothermal areas in Tuscany, the...
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