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William H. Langer

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In April 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted field studies on the Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming, to inventory and evaluate sand and gravel deposits underlying river terraces on tribal lands along the Wind River. This report contains the results for 12 sites of sand and gravel deposits evaluated for their potential use as aggregate in Portland cement concrete, asphalt, and base course. The report provides the results of: * The USGS geologic studies and engineering tests. * A conclusion and recommendation for the best use of sand and gravel materials. * Calculations of available sand and gravel materials. * A scenic quality landscape inventory and evaluation.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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Rapid urbanization of the landscape results in less space available for wildlife habitat, agriculture, and recreation. Mineral resources (especially nonmetallic construction materials) become unrecoverable due to inaccessibility caused by development. This report both describes mine sites with serious problems and draws attention to thoughtful reclamation projects for better future management. It presents information from selected sites in terms of their history, landform, design approach, and visual discernment. Examples from Colorado are included to introduce the broader issue of regions soundly developing mining sites, permitting the best utilization of natural resources, and respecting the landscape.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Circular
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When man first settled the United States, two natural features favored settlement; flat land that was easy to build on and to farm, and a nearby river that could act as a source of water, transportation, and power. The Connecticut River Valley from Middletown, Ct. north past the Connecticut-Massachusetts state line satisfied these two needs, and was favored by many early Americans in New England. This area remains an area of rapid urbanization, partly because of the broad flat lowlands. The subdued topography of this area is due in large part to deposition of fine-grained materials into glacial Lake Hitchcock. This lake was formed during the Wisconsinan age when southward drainage in the Triassic valley of Connecticut...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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