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What Makes the Desert Bloom? Contribution of Dust and Crusts to Soil Fertility on the Colorado Plateau

Citation

Richard L Reynolds, Susan L Phillips, Marith C Reheis, and Jayne Belnap, What Makes the Desert Bloom? Contribution of Dust and Crusts to Soil Fertility on the Colorado Plateau: .

Summary

Eolian dust (windblown silt and clay) and biological soil crusts are both important to ecosystem functioning of arid lands. Dust furnishes essential nutrients, influences hydrology, contributes to soil formation, and renders surfaces vulnerable to erosion. Biological soil crusts contribute directly to soil fertility by fixing carbon and nitrogen, and indirectly by trapping newly-deposited dust and stabilizing already-present soil. Results from crust-stabilized, unconsolidated sandy sediments on prominent rock exposures and grasslands show dust inputs have significantly increased all bio-essential nutrients in soils of SE Utah, including P, K, Mg, Na, and Ca. As plants can be P and K-limited in these soils, dust may be essential for [...]

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  • Upper Colorado River Basin

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From Source - Mendeley RIS export <br> On - Tue May 10 10:22:59 CDT 2011

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Title Citation What Makes the Desert Bloom? Contribution of Dust and Crusts to Soil Fertility on the Colorado Plateau

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