Skip to main content
USGS - science for a changing world

When Invasive Plants Disappear: Transformative Restoration Possibilities in the Western United States Resulting from Climate Change

Citation

Bethany A Bradley, and David S Wilcove, When Invasive Plants Disappear: Transformative Restoration Possibilities in the Western United States Resulting from Climate Change: .

Summary

Most ecologists believe that climate change poses a significant threat to the persistence of native species. However, in some areas climate change may reduce or eliminate non-native invasive species, creating opportunities for restoration. If invasive species are no longer suited to novel climate conditions, the native communities that they replaced may not be viable either. If neither invasive nor native species are climatically viable, a type of “transformative� restoration will be required, involving the translocation of novel species that can survive and reproduce under new climate conditions. Here, we illustrate one approach for restoration planning by using bioclimatic envelope modeling to identify restoration opportunities [...]

Contacts

Attached Files

Click on title to download individual files attached to this item.

metadata.xml 2.5 KB

Communities

  • Upper Colorado River Basin

Tags

Provenance

From Source - Mendeley RIS export <br> On - Tue May 10 12:05:00 CDT 2011

Additional Information

Identifiers

Type Scheme Key
Title Citation When Invasive Plants Disappear: Transformative Restoration Possibilities in the Western United States Resulting from Climate Change

Citation Extension

noteNotes
tableOfContentsTable of Contents
citationTypeMendeley

Item Actions

View Item as ...

Save Item as ...

View Item...