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A biogeographical approach to plant invasions: the importance of studying exotics in their introduced and native range

Citation

John L Maron, Jose L Hierro, and Ragan M Callaway, A biogeographical approach to plant invasions: the importance of studying exotics in their introduced and native range: .

Summary

1 Most theory and empirical research on exotic invasions is based on the assumption that problematic exotics are much more abundant in the regions where they invade than in the regions where they are native. However, the overwhelming majority of studies on exotic plants have been conducted solely within the introduced range. With few exceptions, ecologists know surprisingly little about the abundance, interaction strengths and ecosystems impacts of even the best-studied exotics in their native range. 2 We argue that taking a biogeographical approach is key to understanding exotic plant invasions. On a descriptive level, unambiguous quantification of distributions and abundances of exotics in native and introduced ranges are crucial. [...]

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Title Citation A biogeographical approach to plant invasions: the importance of studying exotics in their introduced and native range

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