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Food web pathway determines how selenium affects aquatic ecosystems: A San francisco Bay case study

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Food web pathway determines how selenium affects aquatic ecosystems: A San francisco Bay case study; 2004; Article; Journal; Environmental Science and Technology; Stewart, A. R.; Luoma, S. N.; Schlekat, C. E.; Doblin, M. A.; Hieb, K. A.

Summary

Chemical contaminants disrupt ecosystems, but specific effects may be under-appreciated when poorly known processes such as uptake mechanisms, uptake via diet, food preferences, and food web dynamics are influential. Here we show that a combination of food web structure and the physiology of trace element accumulation explain why some species in San Francisco Bay are threatened by a relatively low level of selenium contamination and some are not. Bivalves and crustacean zooplankton form the base of two dominant food webs in estuaries. The dominant bivalve Potamocorbula amurensis has a 10-fold slower rate constant of loss for selenium than do common crustaceans such as copepods and the mysid Neomysis mercedis (rate constant of loss, [...]

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Type Scheme Key
local-index unknown 70026685
local-pk unknown 70026685
doi http://www.loc.gov/standards/mods/mods-outline-3-5.html#identifier doi:10.1021/es0499647
series unknown Environmental Science & Technology

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journalEnvironmental Science & Technology
parts
typevolume
value38
typeissue
value17
languageEnglish
citationTypeArticle

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