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Community Resilience to Drought Hazard: An Analysis of Drought Exposure, Impacts, and Adaptation in the South Central U.S.

Principal Investigator
Nina Lam

Dates

Start Date
2014-08-12
End Date
2016-08-11
Release Date
2014

Summary

The threat of droughts and their associated impacts on the landscape and human communities has long been recognized in the United States, especially in high risk areas such as the South Central region. There is ample literature on the effects of long-term climate change and short-term climate variability on the occurrence of droughts. However, it is unclear whether this information meets the needs of relevant stakeholders and actually contributes to reducing the vulnerability or increasing the resilience of communities to droughts. For example, are the methods used to characterize the severity of drought – known as drought indices – effective tools for predicting the actual damage felt by communities? As droughts continue to increase [...]

Child Items (4)

Contacts

Principal Investigator :
Nina Lam
Co-Investigator :
Robert Rohli, Margaret Reams
Funding Agency :
South Central CSC
Cooperator/Partner :
John Tirpak, Cynthia Edwards
CMS Group :
Climate Adaptation Science Centers (CASC) Program

Attached Files

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LakeAmistad_TX_AlanCressler.jpg
“Amistad Reservoir, TX - Credit: Alan Cressler”
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Purpose

The threat of droughts and their associated impacts on the landscape and human communities has long been recognized in the United States, especially in high risk areas such as the South Central region. There is ample literature on the effects of long-term climate change and short-time climate variability on the occurrence of droughts. However, while the information on droughts is rich and accessible, it is unclear if the information produced meets the needs of the stakeholders and whether such information has actually reduced the vulnerability to droughts and increased the resilience of the affected communities. The objectives of this study are to examine (1) whether drought indices are effective in predicting the occurrence of drought events and their actual damages, (2) how the adaptive capacity of the communities vary, and (3) what management tools would be most effective for prevention and damage reduction. The study region will include all the counties in New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana. The varying degrees of drought exposure in these four states provide an ideal setting for comparison. The research will collect and analyze three types of data: county-level data on drought hazards, damages, and socioeconomic variables; drought indices that need to be converted to the county level for analysis, and household surveys of selected counties. The research is partnered with two Landscape Conservation Cooperatives and supports their strategic science needs. In addition to gaining the scientific knowledge of the linkages between drought indices, damages, and community resilience, the research will (1) develop tools to measure drought resilience; (2) identify key indicators of resilience; (3) identify the gaps between drought indices and actual damages; and (4) identify the factors that influence residents to adopt adaptive measures.

Project Extension

projectStatusCompleted
parts
typeGeneral Public Summary
valueThe threat of droughts and their associated impacts on the landscape and human communities has long been recognized in the United States, especially in the high risk areas such as the South Central region. There is ample literature on the effects of long-term climate change and short-time climate variability on the occurrence of droughts. However, while the information on droughts is rich and accessible, it is unclear if the information produced meets the needs of the stakeholders and whether such information has actually reduced the vulnerability to droughts and increased the resilience of the affected communities. The objectives of this study are (1) to examine whether drought indices are effective in predicting the occurrence of drought events and their actual damages, (2) how the adaptive capacity of the communities vary, and (3) what management tools would be most effective for prevention and damage reduction. The study region will include all the counties in New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana. The varying degrees of drought exposure in these four states provide an ideal setting for comparison. The research will collect and analyze three types of data: county-level data on drought hazards, damages, and socioeconomic variables; drought indices that need to be converted to the county level for analysis, and household surveys of selected counties. The research is partnered with two Landscape Conservation Cooperatives and supports their strategic science needs. In addition to gaining the scientific knowledge of the linkages between drought indices, damages, and community resilience, the research will (1) develop tools to measure drought resilience; (2) identify key indicators of resilience; (3) identify the gaps between drought indices and actual damages; (4) identify the factors that influence residents to adopt adaptive measures.
typeTechnical Summary
valueThe threat of droughts and their associated impacts on the landscape and human communities has long been recognized in the United States, especially in the high risk areas such as the South Central region. There is ample literature on the effects of long-term climate change and short-time climate variability on the occurrence of droughts. However, while the information on droughts is rich and accessible, it is unclear if the information produced meets the needs of the stakeholders and whether such information has actually reduced the vulnerability to droughts and increased the resilience of the affected communities. The objectives of this study are (1) to examine whether drought indices are effective in predicting the occurrence of drought events and their actual damages, (2) how the adaptive capacity of the communities vary, and (3) what management tools would be most effective for prevention and damage reduction. The study region will include all the counties in New Mexico, Texas, Oklahoma, and Louisiana. The varying degrees of drought exposure in these four states provide an ideal setting for comparison. The research will collect and analyze three types of data: county-level data on drought hazards, damages, and socioeconomic variables; drought indices that need to be converted to the county level for analysis, and household surveys of selected counties. The research is partnered with two Landscape Conservation Cooperatives and supports their strategic science needs. In addition to gaining the scientific knowledge of the linkages between drought indices, damages, and community resilience, the research will (1) develop tools to measure drought resilience; (2) identify key indicators of resilience; (3) identify the gaps between drought indices and actual damages; (4) identify the factors that influence residents to adopt adaptive measures.

Budget Extension

totalFunds254485.0
annualBudgets
year2014
totalFunds159875.0
year2015
totalFunds94610.0

Additional Information

Identifiers

Type Scheme Key
RegistrationUUID NCCWSC 88dc4e22-3bb8-4335-acc7-a05f33d4ac92
StampID NCCWSC SC13-LN17855

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