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Vulnerability of shallow ground water and drinking-water wells to nitrate in the United States: Model of predicted nitrate concentration in U.S. ground water used for drinking (simulation depth 50 meters) -- Input data set for drainageditch (gwava-dw_ddit)

Dates

Publication Date
Time Period
1991
Time Period
2003
File Modification Date
2017-05-16 10:00:23

Citation

Hitt, K.J., 2007, Vulnerability of shallow ground water and drinking-water wells to nitrate in the United States: Model of predicted nitrate concentration in U.S. ground water used for drinking (simulation depth 50 meters) -- Input data set for drainageditch (gwava-dw_ddit): U.S. Geological Survey, http://pubs3.acs.org/acs/journals/doilookup?in_doi=10.1021/es060911u.

Summary

This data set represents the area of National Resources Inventory surface drainage, field ditch conservation practice, in square kilometers, in the conterminous United States. The data set was used as an input data layer for a national model to predict nitrate concentration in ground water used for drinking. Nolan and Hitt (2006) developed two national models to predict contamination of ground water by nonpoint sources of nitrate. The nonlinear approach to national-scale Ground-WAter Vulnerability Assessment (GWAVA) uses components representing nitrogen (N) sources, transport, and attenuation. One model (GWAVA-S) predicts nitrate contamination of shallow (typically less than 5 meters deep), recently recharged ground water, which may [...]

Contacts

Point of Contact :
Kerri Hitt.
Originator :
Hitt, K.J.
Metadata Contact :
U.S. Geological Survey
Publisher :
U.S. Geological Survey
Distributor :
U.S. Geological Survey

Attached Files

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gwava-dw_ddit.xml
Original FGDC Metadata

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43.7 KB

Purpose

This particular data layer was created to help characterize nitrogen transport factors at a national level for input to a national model to predict nitrate concentration in ground water used for drinking. Nitrate is considered to be the most widespread contaminant in ground water. High nitrate concentration in ground water is a concern for human health, and protecting drinking water sources is a national priority. The U.S. Geological Survey's National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program monitors the occurrence and distribution of nitrate and other contaminants in ground water and streams. However, because monitoring everywhere for the occurrence and distribution of nitrate in ground water is impractical, national water-quality models are used to address data gaps. The goal of the current study was to predict ground water vulnerability to nitrate at the national scale, to complement measured data.

Additional Information

Identifiers

Type Scheme Key
processingUrl https://water.usgs.gov/GIS/metadata/usgswrd/XML/gwava-dw_ddit.xml

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