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Where to Restore Ecological Connectivity? Detecting Barriers and Quantifying Restoration Benefits

PLOS one journal publication

Dates

Creation
2015-06-19 18:41:08
Last Update
2015-06-19 18:42:45
Publication Date
2012-12

Citation

Brad McRae(Author), Sonia Hall(Author), Paul Beier(Author), David M Theobald(Author), North Pacific Landscape Conservation Cooperative(administrator), 2015-06-19(creation), 2015-06-19(lastUpdate), 2012-12(Publication), Where to Restore Ecological Connectivity? Detecting Barriers and Quantifying Restoration Benefits

Summary

Abstract Landscape connectivity is crucial for many ecological processes, including dispersal, gene flow, demographic rescue, and movement in response to climate change. As a result, governmental and non-governmental organizations are focusing efforts to map and conserve areas that facilitate movement to maintain population connectivity and promote climate adaptation. In contrast, little focus has been placed on identifying barriers—landscape features which impede movement between ecologically important areas—where restoration could most improve connectivity. Yet knowing where barriers most strongly reduce connectivity can complement traditional analyses aimed at mapping best movement routes. We introduce a novel method to detect important [...]

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Linked Article 1 - Where to Restore Ecological Connectivity.pdf 905.3 KB
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Citation Extension

noteBrad Mcrae, Sonia Hall, Paul Beier, and David M Theobald, 2012-12, Where to Restore Ecological Connectivity? Detecting Barriers and Quantifying Restoration Benefits: PLOS one, v. 7, iss. 12, p. 1-12.
journalPLOS one
languageeng
citationTypepublication

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