Skip to main content
USGS - science for a changing world

The role of soil pipes as a slope runoff mechanism, Subarctic Yukon, Canada

Dates

Year
2000

Citation

Carey, S. K., and Woo, M. K., 2000, The role of soil pipes as a slope runoff mechanism, Subarctic Yukon, Canada: Journal of Hydrology (Amsterdam), v. 233, no. 1-4, p. 206-222.

Summary

Pipeflow in subarctic slopes provides a preferential runoff mechanism that bypasses the soil matrix, rapidly conveying water to the stream. Extensive soil piping occurs in the central Wolf Creek basin, Yukon, at the interface of the organic and mineral horizons. Flow in these pipes are ephemeral, transmitting water only when the water table is within or above the zone where pipes occur. During snowmelt, pipeflow began several days after the onset of surface runoff. Pipeflow contribution increased until ground thaw lowered the water tables, leaving matrix flow within the organic layer as the dominant mode of runoff. Pipeflow accounted for 21% of runoff during the 15 day melt period of 1997. Following melt, pipeflow recurred only during [...]

Contacts

Tags

Provenance

Data source
File Processing
File Process
Type
End Note
Reference Item
6127 records
Reference File
NWBLCC-20160503-Saved.xml

Additional Information

Citation Extension

journalJournal of Hydrology (Amsterdam)
parts
typeNotes
value1476
typePages
value206-222
typeVolume
value233
typeNumber
value1-4
citationTypeJournal Article

Item Actions

View Item as ...

Save Item as ...