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Concentration of nitrate and other water-quality constituents in groundwater from the water table beneath forage fields receiving seasonal applications of dairy manure, Whatcom County, Washington (2015)

Dates

Publication Date
Start Date
2011-10-14
End Date
2015-05-25

Citation

Cox, S.E., Huffman, R.L., Olsen, T.D., and Spanjer, A.R., 2016, Concentration of nitrate and other water-quality constituents in groundwater from the water table beneath forage fields receiving seasonal applications of dairy manure, Whatcom County, Washington (2015): U.S. Geological Survey data release, https://dx.doi.org/10.5066/F7D50K3F.

Summary

Nitrate contamination of groundwater is widespread and persistent in the shallow surficial aquifer of northwestern Whatcom County where dairy farming and forage production is a primary land-use activity. Application of dairy manure to cropland is intended to provide nutrients for crop growth and improve soil quality with the ideal goal to match the rate of nutrient application to that rate of nutrient removal by the crop. A study to test an alternate strategy for scheduling manure application to fields based on hydrologic properties of specific soils and fields, measurements of manure and soil parameters, and current and forecasted precipitation for the three days immediately following manure application is being evaluated by the Whatcom [...]

Contacts

Point of Contact :
Stephen E. Cox
Originator :
Stephen E. Cox, Raegan L. Huffman, Theresa D. Olsen, Andrew R. Spanjer
Metadata Contact :
Theresa Olsen
Publisher :
USGS
Distributor :
U.S. Geological Survey - ScienceBase
USGS Mission Area :
Water Resources
SDC Data Owner :
Washington Water Science Center

Attached Files

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Whatcom.watertable.QW.csv 226.73 KB
Whatcom_watertable_QW_2015.xml
Original FGDC Metadata

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24.9 KB

Purpose

Comparison of the effects of manure scheduling on leaching losses of nitrogen to groundwater. An alternative manure scheduling procedure (ARM) was compared to the conventional manure spreading practices.

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DOI https://www.sciencebase.gov/vocab/category/item/identifier doi:10.5066/F7D50K3F

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