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When parasites become prey: ecological and epidemiological significance of eating parasites

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Pieter T.J. Johnson, Andrew P. Dobson, Kevin D. Lafferty, David J. Marcogliese, Jane Memmott, Sarah A. Orlofske, Robert Poulin, and David W. Thieltges, 2010, When parasites become prey: ecological and epidemiological significance of eating parasites: Trends in Ecology and Evolution, v. 25, iss. 6.

Summary

Recent efforts to include parasites in food webs have drawn attention to a previously ignored facet of foraging ecology: parasites commonly function as prey within ecosystems. Because of the high productivity of parasites, their unique nutritional composition and their pathogenicity in hosts, their consumption affects both food-web topology and disease risk in humans and wildlife. Here, we evaluate the ecological, evolutionary and epidemiological significance of feeding on parasites, including concomitant predation, grooming, predation on free-living stages and intraguild predation. Combining empirical data and theoretical models, we show that consumption of parasites is neither rare nor accidental, and that it can sharply affect parasite [...]

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Type Scheme Key
local-index unknown 70176786
local-pk unknown 70176786
doi http://www.loc.gov/standards/mods/mods-outline-3-5.html#identifier doi:10.1016/j.tree.2010.01.005
series unknown Trends in Ecology and Evolution

Citation Extension

journalTrends in Ecology and Evolution
parts
typevolume
value25
typeissue
value6
languageEnglish
citationTypeArticle

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