Skip to main content
USGS - science for a changing world

Potential movement paths for male grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) dispersal between the Northern Continental Divide and Greater Yellowstone Ecosystems, 2000-2015

Dates

Publication Date
Start Date
2000-05-01
End Date
2015-10-31

Citation

van Manen, F.T., Peck, C.P., Costello, C.M., Haroldson, M.A., Landenburger, L.A., Roberts, L.L., Bjornlie, D.D., and Mace, R.D., 2017, Potential movement paths for male grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) dispersal between the Northern Continental Divide and Greater Yellowstone Ecosystems, 2000-2015: U.S. Geological Survey data release, https://doi.org/10.5066/F72V2F2W.

Summary

For several decades, grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) populations in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) and the Northern Continental Divide Ecosystem (NCDE) have increased in numbers and range extent. Whereas the NCDE population is contiguous with grizzly bear populations in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, genetic evidence suggests the GYE population remains isolated. Recent analyses indicate the effective population size of GYE grizzly bears has increased and is approaching levels needed for long-term viability. With only ~110 km distance separating current estimates of occupied range for these populations, the potential for immigration into the GYE from an NCDE migrant, or vice versa, is likely greater now than it has been for many [...]

Child Items (2)

Contacts

Purpose

Potential movement paths for male-mediated gene flow between the GYE and the NCDE is an important information need identified by federal, state, and tribal managers. Advances in analytical techniques combined with extensive, long-term GPS data for grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) provided the opportunity to apply the randomized shortest path (RSP) method with individual-based movement data to predict male grizzly bear paths between functional areas. Our study provides detailed, spatially-explicit information for land managers and organizations working with land owners to identify and prioritize conservation measures that enhance the integrity of areas supporting potential movement of male grizzly bears. These measures could, for example, include conservation easements and land purchases; mitigation of highway and other infrastructure barriers across key movement paths; and proactive education and attractant management programs to prevent or reduce bear-human conflict.

Additional Information

Identifiers

Type Scheme Key
doi https://www.sciencebase.gov/vocab/category/item/identifier doi:10.5066/F72V2F2W

Item Actions

View Item as ...

Save Item as ...

View Item...