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Data release for Quantifying ecosystem service flows at multiple scales across the range of a long-distance migratory species

Quantifying ecosystem service flows at multiple scales across the range of a long-distance migratory species

Dates

Publication Date
Time Period
2017

Citation

Semmens, D.J., Diffendorfer, J.E., Bagstad, K.J., Wiederholt, Ruscena, Oberhauser, Karen, Ries, Leslie, Semmens, B.X., Goldstein, Joshua, Loomis, John, Thogmartin, W.E., Mattsson, B.J., López-Hoffman, Laura, Ancona, Zachary, 2018, Data release for Quantifying ecosystem service flows at multiple scales across the range of a long-distance migratory species: U.S. Geological Survey data release, https://doi.org/10.5066/F7X63KVF.

Summary

Migratory species provide ecosystem goods and services throughout their annual cycles, often over long distances. Designing effective conservation solutions for migratory species requires knowledge of both species ecology and the socioeconomic context of their migrations. We present a framework built around the concept that migratory species act as carriers, delivering benefit flows to people throughout their annual cycle that are supported by the network of ecosystems upon which the species depend. We apply this framework to the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) migration of eastern North America by calculating their spatial subsidies. Spatial subsidies are the net ecosystem service flows throughout a species’ range and a quantitative [...]

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Quantifying_ES_Flow_Regions.zip 2.05 MB
Metadata_Quantifying_Ecosystem_Service_02012017.xml
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Purpose

The monarch population decline and correspondingly elevated risk of losing the eastern monarch migration (Semmens et al. 2016) have galvanized support for conservation across North America, with the Presidents of Mexico and the U.S. and the Prime Minister of Canada agreeing in 2014 to devise a plan for saving the continent’s monarch butterfly migration (Baker and Malkin 2014). Understanding where conservation efforts are needed from an ecological perspective has been the traditional focus of migratory species conservation efforts. However, the multi-national conservation effort for monarchs also raises important questions about who will benefit most from conservation investment, who will be negatively impacted (e.g., the opportunity cost of habitat protection), and how to balance the costs and benefits of conservation across a species’ migratory range. The spatial subsidy approach represents the first quantitative means of addressing these questions within the context of migratory species conservation. We use the monarch case study to explore how subsidies (net ES flows) can vary in relation to the spatial configuration of social and ecological boundaries. The shapefile provided can be used to reproduce subsidy calculations or to conduct any further analysis using the input data outlined in the report.

Additional Information

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DOI https://www.sciencebase.gov/vocab/category/item/identifier doi:10.5066/F7X63KVF

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