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Precipitation (Mean: Dec - Mar) - 2020-2050 - RCP8.5 - Min

Dates

Publication Date
Start Date
1980
End Date
2100

Citation

Science Framework Climate Working Group, 201612, Precipitation (Mean: Dec - Mar) - 2020-2050 - RCP8.5 - Min: .

Summary

Future climates are simulated by general circulation models (GCM) using climate change scenarios (IPCC 2014). To project climate change for the sagebrush biome, we used 11 GCMs and two climate change scenarios from the IPCC Fifth Assessment, representative concentration pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5 (Moss et al. 2010, Van Vuuren et al. 2011). RCP4.5 scenario represents a future where climate policies limit and achieve stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations to 4.5 W m-2 by 2100. RCP8.5 scenario might be called a business-as-usual scenario, where high emissions of greenhouse gases continue in the absence of climate change policies. The two selected time frames allow comparison of near-term (2020-2050) and longer-term (2070-2100) [...]

Contacts

Point of Contact :
John Bradford
Process Contact :
John Bradford
Originator :
Science Framework Climate Working Group
Metadata Contact :
John Bradford
Distributor :
John Bradford

Attached Files

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Extension: PPT_DJFM_mid85_cellMin.zip
PPT_DJFM_mid85_cellMin.tif 655.75 KB
PPT_DJFM_mid85_cellMin.xml
Original FGDC Metadata

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25.38 KB
PPT_DJFM_mid85_cellMin.tif-ColorRamp.SLD 2.08 KB

Purpose

These changes in precipitation and temperature can influence water cycling and alter the temporal and depth patterns of soil water availability to plants. In particular, warmer temperatures and slightly wetter winters will promote greater moisture availability during winter and early spring, but soils are likely to dry out earlier in the year, creating longer and drier periods of limited moisture availability during the warm season. Geographic patterns identified in projections of climate change illustrate important variations among big sagebrush ecoregions and, thus, sage-grouse habitat types. In particular, the largest increases in spring soil water availability are projected to occur in the high-elevation, mountain big sagebrush and mountain brush areas in the eastern and central portion of the sagebrush biome (Palmquist et al., in review). By contrast, the most dramatic decreases in summer soil moisture are projected in the west-central part of the sagebrush biome. Furthermore, days with wet soil are projected to decrease throughout the range of big sagebrush ecosystems due to temperature related increases in evapotranspiration. These decreases will be especially large in the mid- to high-elevation areas in the northern portion of the biome.

Additional Information

Raster Extension

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