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Merging paleobiology with conservation biology to guide the future of terrestrial ecosystems

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Barnosky A.D., Hadly E.A., Gonzalez P., Head J., Polly P.D., Lawing A.M., Eronen J.T., Ackerly D.D., Alex K., Biber E., Blois J., Brashares J., Ceballos G., Davis E., Dietl G.P., Dirzo R., Doremus H., Fortelius M., Greene H.W., Hellmann J., Hickler T., Jackson S.T., Kemp M., Koch P.L., Kremen C., Lindsey E.L., Looy C., Marshall C.R., Mendenhall C., Mulch A., Mychajliw A.M., Nowak C., Ramakrishnan U., Schnitzler J., Das Shrestha K., Solari K., Stegner L., Stegner M.A., Stenseth N.Chr., Wake M.H., Zhang Z. Conserving Terrestrial Ecosystems On A Rapidly Changing Planet Science 10 Feb 2017: Vol. 355, Issue 6325, eaah4787

Summary

The current impacts of humanity on nature are rapid and destructive, but species turnover and change have occurred throughout the history of life. Although there is much debate about the best approaches to take in conservation, ultimately, we need to permit or enhance the resilience of natural systems so that they can continue to adapt and function into the future. In a Review, Barnosky et al. argue that the best way to do this is to look back at paleontological history as a way to understand how ecological resilience is maintained, even in the face of change.

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Type Scheme Key
local-index unknown 70191924
local-pk unknown 70191924
doi http://www.loc.gov/standards/mods/mods-outline-3-5.html#identifier doi:10.1126/science.aah4787
series unknown Science

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citationTypeArticle
journalScience
languageEnglish
parts
typevolume
value355
typeissue
value6325

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