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Host feeding ecology and trophic position significantly influence isotopic discrimination between a generalist ectoparasite and its hosts: implications for parasite-host trophic studies

Dates

Publication Date
Start Date
2010-05-01
End Date
2013-08-01

Citation

Jenkins, W.G., Demopoulos, A.W.J., and Sikkel, P.C., 2018, Host feeding ecology and trophic position significantly influence isotopic discrimination between a generalist ectoparasite and its hosts: implications for parasite-host trophic studies: U.S. Geological Survey data release, https://doi.org/10.5066/F7416WBQ.

Summary

Despite being one of the most prevalent forms of consumerism in ecological communities, parasitism has largely been excluded from food-web models. Stable isotope analysis of consumers and their diets has been widely used in the study of food-webs for decades. However, the amount of information regarding parasite stable isotope ecology is limited, restricting the ability of ecologists to use stable isotope analysis to study parasites in food-webs. This study took advantage of distinct differences in the feeding ecology and trophic position of different species of fish known to host the same common micropredatory gnathiid isopod, to study the effects of host stable isotope ecology on that of the associated micropredator. Blood engorged [...]

Contacts

Point of Contact :
Amanda W Demopoulos
Originator :
William G Jenkins, Amanda W Demopoulos, Paul C. Sikkel
Metadata Contact :
Amanda W Demopoulos
SDC Data Owner :
Wetland and Aquatic Research Center
USGS Mission Area :
Ecosystems
Distributor :
U.S. Geological Survey - ScienceBase

Attached Files

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Jenkins_etal_Spreadsheet_20180629.xlsx 46.36 KB
Jenkins_etal_Metadata_20180629.xml
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Purpose

Data were obtained in order to assess stable isotope discrimination patterns between a parasitic gnathiid isopod and its hosts in order to improve the utility of stable isotope analysis when studying the role of this ecologically significant micropredator in food webs

Additional Information

Identifiers

Type Scheme Key
DOI https://www.sciencebase.gov/vocab/category/item/identifier doi:10.5066/F7416WBQ

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