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Detections and concentrations of compounds of emerging concern at water treatment plants and in the Trinity River in or near Dallas, Texas, 2009-13

Dates

Publication Date
Start Date
2009-08-12
End Date
2013-08-28

Citation

Null, M.L., Trevino, J.M., and Churchill, C.J., 2019, Detections and concentrations of compounds of emerging concern at water treatment plants and in the Trinity River in or near Dallas, Texas, 2009-13: U.S. Geological Survey data release, https://doi.org/10.5066/P9QUPBZK.

Summary

This data release documents water-quality data obtained as part of an assessment of compounds of emerging concern (CECs) measured in samples collected at potable water and wastewater treatment plants in Dallas and downstream from Dallas in the Trinity River from August 2009 to December 2013 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the City of Dallas, Dallas Water Utilities. Targeted CECs (120 total) included human-health pharmaceuticals (prescription and non-prescription), antibiotics, steroidal hormones, stanols, sterols, detergents, personal-use products (flavors and fragrances), pesticides and repellents, industrial wastewater compounds, disinfection compounds, PAHs, flame retardants, and plasticizers. Water samples were [...]

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Attached Files

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PWTP.txt 508.05 KB
WWTP.txt 365.03 KB
TR.txt 976.67 KB
Percent_Recoveries.txt 455 Bytes
CECs_Trinity River.xml
Original FGDC Metadata

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29.7 KB

Purpose

Some CECs are known to resist degradation during water treatment processes at potable and wastewater treatment plants (PWTPs and WWTPs). If treated-effluent discharged from WWTPs to the Trinity River contains CECs that were not degraded during treatment, these compounds could negatively affect the receiving waters of the Trinity River by causing adverse ecological or human health effects. Stream-water and bed-sediment data obtained from samples collected from the Trinity River could yield information regarding the transport, attenuation, and fate of CECs in this effluent-dominated river. To date, the occurrence, concentrations, and distributions of CECs in waters of the Trinity River Basin have not been studied. Therefore, the USGS, in cooperation with the City of Dallas, Dallas Water Utilities, assessed the occurrence, concentrations, and distributions of CECs in raw water and finished water at the City’s potable treatment plants, in untreated-influent- and treated-effluent water at the City’s wastewater treatment plants, and at five sites in the receiving waters of the Trinity River between Dallas and Trinidad.

Additional Information

Identifiers

Type Scheme Key
DOI https://www.sciencebase.gov/vocab/category/item/identifier doi:10.5066/P9QUPBZK

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