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Physics-based numerical model simulations of wave propagation over and around theoretical atoll and island morphologies for sea-level rise scenarios

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Publication Date

Citation

Shope, J.B., and Storlazzi, C.D., 2019, Physics-based numerical model simulations of wave propagation over and around theoretical atoll and island morphologies for sea-level rise scenarios: U.S. Geological Survey data release, https://doi.org/10.5066/P9U28JFO.

Summary

Schematic atoll models with varying theoretical morphologies were used to evaluate the relative control of individual morphological parameters on alongshore transport gradients. Here we present physics-based numerical SWAN model results of incident wave transformations for a range of atoll and island morphologies and sea-level rise scenarios. Model results are presented in NetCDF format, accompanied by a README text file that lists the parameters used in each model run. These data accompany the following publication: Shope, J.B., and Storlazzi, C.D., 2019, Assessing morphologic controls on atoll island alongshore sediment transport gradients due to future sea-level rise: Frontiers in Marine Science, doi:10.3389/fmars.2019.00245.

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“Output of model simulations”
1.07 GB
Atoll_Schematic_NetCDFs_README.txt
“Model run parameters”
89.31 KB
Atoll_Schematic_NetCDFs_metadata.xml
Original FGDC Metadata

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13.49 KB

Purpose

Low-lying atoll islands are threatened by the effects of climate change, sea-level rise, and wave-driven flooding. Atolls differ widely in their morphologies and other physical characteristics; the wave and water level conditions along these coastlines vary in space and time. These factors make it difficult to project wave-driven alongshore sediment transport changes in accretion and/or deposition along atoll island shorelines under different forcing conditions, especially for future sea-level rise. We generated a number of ideal schematic atoll and atoll island topographies/bathymetries, then used a physics-based numerical wave model and empirical formulations of alongshore sediment transport to project how sea-level rise may alter alongshore sediment transport gradients along atoll island shorelines. The transport gradients were used to evaluate the relative risk of coastal change on atoll islands of differing morphologies due to sea-level rise.

Additional Information

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DOI https://www.sciencebase.gov/vocab/category/item/identifier doi:10.5066/P9U28JFO

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