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Molokai (Kawela) USGS ridge-to-reef vegetation monitoring study 2009-2014

Dates

Publication Date
Start Date
2009
End Date
2014

Citation

Jacobi, J.D., 2018, Molokai (Kawela) USGS ridge-to-reef vegetation monitoring study 2009-2014: U.S. Geological Survey data release, https://doi.org/10.5066/P9RXS3HU.

Summary

This data release contains two files: 1) the raw data collected as part of a vegetation monitoring study that was conducted to assess the changes in plant species frequency inside and outside a fenced exclosure, constructed to eliminate browsing and grazing by feral goats, from 2009-2014 in the US Geological Survey's Kawela research site on the island of Molokai, Hawaii. 2) A list of species that were recorded during the vegetation monitoring or species that were found in the general area but not recorded during monitoring.

Child Items (2)

Contacts

Point of Contact :
James D Jacobi
Originator :
James D Jacobi
Metadata Contact :
James D Jacobi
Publisher :
U.S. Geological Survey
Distributor :
U.S. Geological Survey - ScienceBase
SDC Data Owner :
Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center
USGS Mission Area :
Ecosystems

Attached Files

Click on title to download individual files attached to this item.

Molokai_R2R_Vegetation_Monitoring_Project_Description.xml
Original FGDC Metadata

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16.94 KB
Panorama April 2010.jpg
“Photo source: J. Jacobi, USGS.”
thumbnail 7.28 MB

Purpose

This project was conducted to asses the response of a highly degraded lowland dry habitat plant community located on the south slope of east Moloka‘i, Hawai‘i, to reduction of browsing and grazing impacts caused by feral goats. For this study, vegetation response inside a fenced exclosure was compared to vegetation change in the area outside of the fence that was still accessible to goats. This study is part of the larger U.S. Geological Survey Ridge-to-Reef (USGS-R2R) research project conducted between 2008 and 2014 to better understand the magnitude of, and factors responsible for, increased erosion on Moloka‘i. The upslope erosion has resulted in heavy sedimentation of the near-shore coral reef ecosystem on the leeward side of the island.
Photo source: J. Jacobi, USGS.
Photo source: J. Jacobi, USGS.

Map

Spatial Services

ScienceBase WMS

Communities

  • Pacific Island Ecosystems Research Center
  • USGS Data Release Products

Tags

Provenance

Additional Information

Identifiers

Type Scheme Key
DOI https://www.sciencebase.gov/vocab/category/item/identifier doi:10.5066/P9RXS3HU

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