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Lignin phenol data for solid phase peat cores collected from the Alligator River and Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuges

Dates

Publication Date
Start Date
2015-03
End Date
2015-03

Citation

Stricker, C.A., 2019, Lignin phenol data for solid phase peat cores collected from the Alligator River and Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuges: U.S. Geological Survey data release, https://doi.org/10.5066/P9EFGR4F.

Summary

This dataset includes lignin phenol monomer concentrations normalized to 100 mg of organic carbon. These analyses were conducted on select intervals from peat cores collected at the Alligator River (AR) and Great Dismal Swamp (GDS) National Wildlife Refuges in North Carolina and Virginia/North Carolina, USA, respectively. The eight lignin phenol monomers provide unique proxy information on the source, character, and state of decomposition of soil organic matter. Peat cores from the GDS were collected from three main forest communities; pocosin (POC; dominated by pond pine in the canopy and shrubs), Atlantic white cedar (AWC: called CDR to differentiate from the AR cores), and red maple-black gum (MPL). The GDS has been subject to intensive [...]

Contacts

Process Contact :
Craig A Stricker, Southwest Region
Originator :
Craig A Stricker
Metadata Contact :
Craig A Stricker
Publisher :
U.S. Geological Survey
Distributor :
U.S. Geological Survey - ScienceBase
SDC Data Owner :
Fort Collins Science Center
USGS Mission Area :
Ecosystems

Attached Files

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SE Peatlands_Lignin Monomers_data.csv 11.62 KB
SE Peatlands_Lignin Phenols.xml
Original FGDC Metadata

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22.17 KB

Purpose

The GDS is a large, shrub- and tree-dominated peatland in the southeastern U.S., where lowering of the water table seasonally or during a moderate drought does not typically result in increased decomposition of the carbon sink. Such resistance of the peat to decay has been attributed to the unusually high polyphenol content of the forest cover. However, since colonial times the GDS has been subject to logging and drainage via an extensive ditch network. Drainage over a period of ~200 years has resulted in conditions which are highly comparable to that of a chronic, severe drought. Further, selective logging of AWC had led to major changes in plant community composition whereby formerly gymnosperm (AWC) dominated areas are now dominated by angiosperms (red maple-black gum). The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of long-term drainage and AWC loss on the carbon chemistry of GDS peats. Results indicate that GDS peats had lower lignin contents, particularly at depth, higher syringyl group phenols in the surface layers, consistent with a transition to angiosperms, and were more decomposed, particularly at depth, and that this occurred under aerobic conditions. These data indicate that long-term drainage has accelerated the decomposition of peat at the GDS, reducing the capacity and stability of the carbon sink.

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Communities

  • Fort Collins Science Center (FORT)
  • USGS Data Release Products

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Additional Information

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Type Scheme Key
DOI https://www.sciencebase.gov/vocab/category/item/identifier doi:10.5066/P9EFGR4F

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