Skip to main content

Hydrogeochemical data for the characterization of stream, groundwater, and beaver-induced floodplain exchange in the East River Science Focus Area, Crested Butte, CO

Dates

Publication Date
Start Date
2016-08-10
End Date
2018-10-01

Citation

Briggs, M.A., Wang, C., Slater, L., Fosberg, D., and Day-Lewis, F.D., 2019, Hydrogeochemical data for the characterization of stream, groundwater, and beaver-induced floodplain exchange in the East River Science Focus Area, Crested Butte, CO: U.S. Geological Survey data release, https://doi.org/10.5066/P9Q1Z1TK.

Summary

The U.S. Geological Survey, along with scientists from Rutgers University, collected water chemistry, electromagnetic, redox-potential, dissolved oxygen, water flow rate, and water temperature data along stream and river corridors in multiple sub-watersheds of the East River Science Focus Area (SFA) near Crested Butte, CO. The concept of ‘river corridor’ science recognizes that the quality of flowing surface waters is intrinsically linked to their contributing catchments through hydrologic connectivity, including lower terrestrial hillslopes, floodplains, and riparian zones. Bidirectional river-floodplain exchange in particular can be critical to basin water storage and nutrient transformation dynamics, yet floodplain hydrologic exchange [...]

Contacts

Attached Files

Click on title to download individual files attached to this item.

IMG_20180731_130250.jpg thumbnail 7.14 MB
Electromagnetic_imaging.zip 18.33 MB
DO.zip 208.46 KB
FO_DTS.zip 44.4 MB
Infrared.zip 113.57 MB
Redox.zip 31.71 KB
Vertical_temp.zip 55.27 KB
Water_chemistry.zip 8.99 KB

Purpose

There were multiple purposes for this ground-based data collection. At a high level, these data are primarily used to characterize lateral exchanges of groundwater and surface water, and associated mass-flux of dissolved constituents, along beaver-impacted river corridors of the SFA. More specifically, the infrared and fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FODTS) data are used to geolocate deeper groundwater discharge and distinguish from more shallow, lateral hydrologic exchanges between the main channel and adjacent floodplain. Water chemistry and dissolved oxygen data indicate the reactivity and redox state of flowpaths, and mass-transfer of various dissolved metals and nutrients. Electromagnetic data are used to identify shallow electrically-conductive flowpaths. Vertical bed temperature data are used to assess upward or downward vertical fluid flux using analytical models.

Additional Information

Identifiers

Type Scheme Key
DOI https://www.sciencebase.gov/vocab/category/item/identifier doi:10.5066/P9Q1Z1TK

Item Actions

View Item as ...

Save Item as ...

View Item...