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Lethality of bloom forming cyanobacteria on zebra and quagga mussel veligers collected from the Detroit River

Dates

Publication Date
Start Date
2016-01-01
End Date
2017-01-01

Citation

Boegehold, A.G., Johnson, N.S., and Kashian, D.R., 2019, Lethality of bloom forming cyanobacteria on zebra and quagga mussel veligers collected from the Detroit River: U.S. Geological Survey data release, https://doi.org/10.5066/P9WQ5VF8.

Summary

Zebra and quagga mussel veligers were exposed to eleven distinct cultures (isolates) of cyanobacteria representing Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, Dolichospermum, Microcystis, and Planktothrix species and the cyanotoxin microcystin to determine the lethality of cyanobacteria on dreissenid veligers. Six-day laboratory bioassays were performed in microplates using dreissenid veligers collected from the Detroit River, Michigan, USA. Veligers were exposed to increasing concentrations of cyanobacteria and microcystin using the green algae Chlorella minutissima as a control. Raw data were fit to dose response curves formulated from a Probit model to calculate LC50 values. This data release presents the raw data summarized and discussed in the manuscript [...]

Contacts

Point of Contact :
Nicholas S Johnson
Originator :
Anna G. Boegehold, Nicholas S Johnson, Donna R. Kashian
Metadata Contact :
Nicholas S Johnson
Publisher :
U.S. Geological Survey
Distributor :
U.S. Geological Survey - ScienceBase
SDC Data Owner :
Great Lakes Science Center
USGS Mission Area :
Ecosystems

Attached Files

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Toxicity_of_cyanobacteria_to_veligers.csv
“Data”
2.95 KB
Veliger and cyanobacteria toxicity_Final revised-v2.xml
“Metadata”
Original FGDC Metadata

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28.03 KB

Purpose

Quagga (Dreissena rostriformis bugensis) and zebra (D. polymorpha) mussels are broadcast spawners that produce planktonic, free swimming veligers, a life history strategy dissimilar to native North American freshwater bivalves. Dreissenid veligers require highly nutritious food to grow and survive, and thus may be susceptible to increased mortality rates during harsh environmental conditions like cyanobacteria blooms. However, the impact of cyanobacteria and one of the toxins they can produce (microcystin) has not been evaluated in dreissenid veligers. Therefore, we exposed dreissenid veligers to eleven distinct cultures (isolates) of cyanobacteria representing Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, Dolichospermum, Microcystis, and Planktothrix species and the cyanotoxin microcystin to determine the lethality of cyanobacteria on dreissenid veligers.

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Communities

  • Great Lakes Science Center (GLSC)
  • USGS Data Release Products

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Additional Information

Identifiers

Type Scheme Key
DOI https://www.sciencebase.gov/vocab/category/item/identifier doi:10.5066/P9WQ5VF8

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