Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Contacts: {oldPartyId:3467} (X)

78 results (88ms)   

Filters
Date Range
Extensions
Types
Contacts
Categories
Tag Types
Tag Schemes
View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
thumbnail
This dataset provides supporting information for the species distribution data used in the associated manuscript. Collections of five non-native fish species were made by a number of institutions, and several capture techniques were used. This dataset also includes number of individuals of each species captured at each locality.
thumbnail
The Crystal Darter (Crystallaria asprella) requires large, clear-water streams with clean sand and gravel bottoms and moderate to swift currents. It is intolerant of siltation and other forms of pollution from various land use practices. Direct habitat degradation from damming, channelization, and dredging has also reduced habitat for this species. Remaining populations have become isolated from one another by dams and impoundments. The Mississippi River most likely no longer serves as a usable corridor for the Crystal Darter because of the silt load. The isolated local populations are then vulnerable to single destructive events such as toxic chemical spills.
The Bering Cisco (Coregonus laurettae) is endemic to Alaska and is present primarily along the State’s west and north coasts. It is known to spawn in only three river systems – the Yukon, Kuskokwim, and Susitna Rivers. Genetic research indicates that each of these populations is distinct. The Bering Cisco has been observed to migrate more than 1,200 miles into freshwater streams to spawn. Unlike salmon, some of these fish survive spawning runs. Since this species is slow-growing but short-lived, it is highly vulnerable to alterations in stream flow or water quality and large-scale environmental disasters.
thumbnail
Available data for the American Eel (Anguilla rostrata) indicate that, overall, there have been declines in recruitment, population, and escapement during three generations (36 years). A recent report indicated that barriers to migration (dams and weirs), passage through turbines at hydropower dams, habitat degradation or loss, and overharvest were likely the greatest threats by humans across the species’ range. Although eels are able to ascend many smaller barriers, recent studies have documented a tenfold reduction in eel density above each potentially passable barrier. For example, the number of juvenile eels migrating to Lake Ontario passing over hydropower dams fell from 935,000 in 1985 to approximately 8,000...
thumbnail
The Waccamaw Silverside (Menidia extensa) has a very limited distribution confined to Lake Waccamaw in North Carolina, a lake with neutral pH levels from underlying limestone formations in an area of acidic natural waters. This species is found in large schools and often over dark-colored substrates. Its limited habitat is threatened by nutrient loading caused by the runoff of organic matter and agricultural chemicals.
thumbnail
The Ironcolor Shiner (Notropis chalybaeus) is found in deep pool areas of creeks and small rivers and is often associated with aquatic vegetation. This species needs clear sandy areas for spawning. Populations of Ironcolor Shiner are in decline due to increased turbidity, siltation, and pollution.
thumbnail
This map was created to help assess impacts on nonindigenous aquatic species distributions due to flooding associated with Hurricane Maria. Storm surge and flood events can assist expansion and distribution of nonindigenous aquatic species through the connection of adjacent watersheds, backflow of water upstream of impoundments, increased downstream flow, and creation of freshwater bridges along coastal regions. This map will help natural resource managers determine potential new locations for individual species, or to develop a watch list of potential new species within a watershed. These data include a subset of data from the Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database, that fall within the general area of the 2017...
This presentation is a product of the 2014 CDI Project: NASWeb API Web Services Access to the Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database. It was presented on Mar. 11, 2015 as part of the CDI Monthly Forum.
thumbnail
The Westslope Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii lewisi) is a subspecies of Cutthroat Trout that requires high quality coldwater fish habitat along with connected river segments. It has been in decline because of habitat degradation from logging, road building, overgrazing, mining, urban development, agriculture and dams, and competition and hybridization from introduced non-native trout species. Intensive habitat restoration efforts are underway to improve populations of this important species. In addition, restrictive harvest regulation strategies have been passed as this species is very vulnerable to angling.
thumbnail
The Checkered Madtom (Noturus flavater) is found in moderate to high gradient, clear, small to medium rivers with strong flow and uses deeper, quiet pools or backwaters of these streams. This type of habitat has been eliminated from part of its former range in the White River, Arkansas, due to dam construction.
thumbnail
This map was created to help assess impacts on nonindigenous aquatic species distributions due to flooding associated with Hurricane Irma. Storm surge and flood events can assist expansion and distribution of nonindigenous aquatic species through the connection of adjacent watersheds, backflow of water upstream of impoundments, increased downstream flow, and creation of freshwater bridges along coastal regions. This map will help natural resource managers determine potential new locations for individual species, or to develop a watch list of potential new species within a watershed. These data include a subset of data from the Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database, that fall within the general area of the 2017...
thumbnail
The Sicklefin Chub (Macrhybopsis meeki) requires main channel gravel and sand runs in turbid flowing waters; however, decreased and controlled flows from dam operations have resulted in excessive siltation of these key gravel beds. Dams also reduce turbidity and alter water temperatures, making the habitat unsuitable for this species.
thumbnail
The Lahontan Cutthroat Trout (Oncorhynchus clarki henshawi) is native to the Lahontan basin of northern Nevada, northeastern California, and southeastern Oregon. Like other native trout species, the Lahontan Cutthroat Trout is found in a wide variety of cold-water habitats including large terminal alkaline lakes, alpine lakes, slow meandering rivers, montane rivers, and small headwater tributary streams. They currently occupy only about 10 percent of their historic range primarily due to habitat fragmentation from dams and water diversions, changes in water flow patterns, loss of riparian and aquatic habitat quality, severe drought conditions, and the introduction of non-native trout species. One population in Walker...
thumbnail
The Sonoran Desert is the only place in the world where Saguaro cacti grow. It can take up to 100 years for a Saguaro cactus to grow an arm in areas of low precipitation. The Sonoran Desert receives more rainfall than any other desert, which is approximately 10 inches (25 centimeters) a year on average. In the 1800s, many people used the Gila River as a trail across Arizona. This trail became known as the Gila Trail. Arizona is large enough to fit all of New England plus the State of Pennsylvania inside of it. Arizona is the only State besides Hawai'i that does not observe Daylight Savings time. Santa Fe, New Mexico, is the highest capital city in the United States at almost 7,200 feet (2,286 meters) above sea level....
The Columbia River historically supported one of the greatest salmon and steelhead runs on Earth. Prior to the 1840s, up to 16 million salmon and steelhead returned to the Columbia River to spawn each year. Unfortunately, by the end of the 20th century that number declined to less than 1 million fish annually. In response to the severe population declines of Columbia River salmon by the 1990s, as the result of habitat degradation in the basin, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) designated 13 stocks of anadromous salmonids as Federally threatened or endangered with extinction under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). There are currently 28 listed stocks of salmon and steelhead, plus an additional three more...
Thank you to all of the agencies, organizations and individuals that helped make this report happen. We would like to give a special thank you to the following groups and individuals. Web Report Development and Design Jacob Juszak and Don Brown – U.S. Geological Survey Fort Collins Science Center Steven Aulenbach and Sky Bristol - U.S. Geological Survey Core Science Analytics, Synthesis, and Libraries Assessment Contributors Alison Collins - Ocean Associates, Inc. in support of NOAA Fisheries (currently with the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California) Arthur Cooper – Michigan State University Correigh Greene - NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center Daniel R. Obenour – North Carolina State...
Tags: 2015, Overview
The Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database (NAS) information resource is an established central repository for spatially referenced biogeographic accounts of introduced aquatic species. The NAS website provides scientific reports, online/real-time queries, spatial data sets, distribution maps, fact sheets, and general information.
thumbnail
The dataset catalogs and describes existing online, federally supported databases and tools dealing with various aspects of a potential national early detection and rapid response invasive species framework. Version 1.0 of this dataset (accessible as a download below, called "deprecated_EDDR databases and tools-20190325.zip") is supplementary material 2 and 3 to the manuscript, "Envisioning a national invasive species information framework" published as part of a special open source issue dealing with invasive species early detection and rapid response by the journal Biological Invasions, Volume 22, Issue 1, January 2020. Version 2.0 (accessible as a download below, called "EDDR databases and tools_V2-0_20200429.xlsx")...
thumbnail
A greater percentage of Alaskan residents fish (53 percent in 2011) than residents of any other State. Alaska’s largest private sector employer is commercial fishing with total annual landings of fish products of 79 billion pounds (36 million metric tons). Nearly all of these fish are from self-sustaining populations. In 1867, the United States Secretary of State William H. Seward offered Russia $7,200,000, or two cents per acre, for Alaska. The State of Rhode Island could fit into Alaska 425 times. Most of America's salmon, crab, halibut, and herring come from Alaska. The State's coastline extends more than 6,600 miles. Alaska is the largest State in the United States and is more than twice the size of Texas.
Agouridis, C. T., S. R. Workman, R. C. Warner, and G. D. Jennings. 2005. Livestock grazing management impacts on stream water quality: a review. Journal of the American Water Resources Association 41(3):591-606. Ali, Muna, and T. R. Sreekrishnan. 2001. Aquatic toxicity from pulp and paper mill effluents: a review. Advances in Environmental Research 5(2): 175-196. Allan, J. D. (2004). Landscapes and riverscapes: the influence of land use on stream ecosystems. Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics 35:257-284. Barbier, E.B., S.D. Hacker, C. Kennedy, E.W. Koch, A.C. Stier, and B.R. Silliman. 2011. The value of estuarine and coastal ecosystem services. Ecological Monographs 81:169-193. Beaulieu, J....


map background search result map search result map Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database Habitat Trouble for Ironcolor Shiner in Upper Midwest States Habitat Trouble for Lahontan Cutthroat Trout in Southwestern States Habitat Trouble for Westslope Cutthroat Trout in Mountain States Habitat Trouble for Crystal Darters in Central Midwest States Habitat Trouble for Sicklefin Chub in Northern Plains States Habitat Trouble for American Eel in Northeastern States Facts About Alaska Habitat Trouble for Waccamaw Silverside in Southeast Atlantic States Facts About Southwestern States Habitat Trouble for Checkered Madtom in Central Mississippi River States Distribution and status of five non-native fish species in the Tampa Bay drainage (USA), a hot spot for fish introductions-Data Nonindigenous aquatic species and potential spread after Hurricane Maria Nonindigenous aquatic species and potential spread after Hurricane Irma Catalog of U.S. Federal Early Detection/Rapid Response Invasive Species Databases and Tools: Version 2.0 Distribution and status of five non-native fish species in the Tampa Bay drainage (USA), a hot spot for fish introductions-Data Nonindigenous aquatic species and potential spread after Hurricane Maria Nonindigenous aquatic species and potential spread after Hurricane Irma Habitat Trouble for Waccamaw Silverside in Southeast Atlantic States Habitat Trouble for Sicklefin Chub in Northern Plains States Habitat Trouble for American Eel in Northeastern States Habitat Trouble for Crystal Darters in Central Midwest States Habitat Trouble for Checkered Madtom in Central Mississippi River States Habitat Trouble for Ironcolor Shiner in Upper Midwest States Habitat Trouble for Lahontan Cutthroat Trout in Southwestern States Facts About Southwestern States Habitat Trouble for Westslope Cutthroat Trout in Mountain States Facts About Alaska Catalog of U.S. Federal Early Detection/Rapid Response Invasive Species Databases and Tools: Version 2.0 Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database