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We studied the distribution and winter survival of the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, in the St. Clair River from the fall of 1988 to the spring of 1990. Between fall of 1988 and spring of 1989, distribution of Corbicula was extended from 5.5 to 11.5 km downstream from an electric power plant. However, total abundance of clams decreased during the winter. By fall of 1989, Corbicula was found 14.5 km from the power plant, and the mean density of clams was 27 individuals/m2. Between fall of 1989 and spring of 1990, distribution was reduced to 7.5 km from the power plant and abundance decreased 97%. During the winter of 1988-1989, we collected clams monthly from one station 2.2 km from the power plant, and we observed...
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SYNOPSIS. Since the discovery of the zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, in the Great Lakes in 1988 comparisons have been made with mussel populations in Europe and the former Soviet Union. These comparisons include: Population dynamics, growth and mortality rates, ecological tolerances and requirements, dispersal rates and patterns, and ecological impacts. North American studies, mostly on the zebra mussel and a few on a second introduced species, the quagga mussel, Dreissena bugensis, have revealed some similarities and some differences. To date it appears that North American populations of zebra mussels are similar to European populations in their basic biological characteristics, population growth and mortality...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: American Zoologist
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A bibliography of over 1000 papers on the biology, impacts, and control of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) in European and Russian waters is compiled to aid scientists and managers in addressing this species of economic and ecological importance. The bibliography primarily includes publications between the early 1960s and early 1990s but does contain some earlier references not found in another extensive bibliography published in 1964. This bibliography will be a valuable tool, especially to water users and environmental scientists in North America where zebra mussels have recently invaded and become established.
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The recent return of burrowing mayfly nymphs (Hexagenia spp.) to western Lake Erie of the Laurentian Great Lakes has prompted a need to find a sampler to obtain the most accurate (i.e., highest mean density) and precise (i.e., lowest mean variance) abundance estimates of nymphs. The abundance of burrowing nymphs is important because it is being used as a measure of ecosystem health to determine management goals for fisheries and pollution abatement programs for waters in both North America and Europe. We compared efficiencies of 5 benthic grab samplers (Ponar, Ekman, petite Ponar, Petersen, and orange-peel) to collect nymphs from sediments of western Lake Erie and Lake St. Clair. Samplers were used at one site with...
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Burrowing mayflies (Hexagenia spp.) are native to western Lake Erie and were abundant until the 1950s, when they disappeared due to degraded water and sediment quality. Nymphs were absent from the sediments of most of western Lake Erie after the 1950s, although small, widely disjunct populations apparently persisted near shore. Sediment samples collected in 1993 revealed several small populations near the western and southern shores and beyond the mouths of the Detroit and Maumee rivers. A larger population was found in the southern island area, but nymphs were absent in the middle of the basin. By 1995, nymphs had spread throughout the western half and eastern end of the basin but remained absent from the middle...
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After a 40-year absence caused by pollution and eutrophication, burrowing mayflies (Hexagenia spp.) recolonized western Lake Erie in the mid 1990s as water quality improved. Mayflies are an important food resource for the economically valuable yellow perch fishery and are considered to be major indicator species of the ecological condition of the lake. Since their reappearance, however, mayfly populations have suffered occasional unexplained recruitment failures. In 2002, a failure of fall recruitment followed an unusually warm summer in which western Lake Erie became temporarily stratified, resulting in low dissolved oxygen levels near the lake floor. In the present study, we examined a possible link between Hexagenia...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Ecological Applications
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The discovery of zebra mussels in North America in 1988 raised concern for water users because the species became abundant enough to obstruct the flow of water in human-made structures such as pipes and screens. This work reviews the biology, distribution, and impacts of zebra mussels in the context of its discovery in the Laurentian Great Lakes and its impending spread to most surface waters of North America.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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Unionid bivalves and attached epizoic zebra mussels (Dreissena polymorpha) were collected at one index station in 1989, 1990, and 1991 and at 17 stations in 1991 in offshore waters of western Lake Erie of the Laurentian Great Lakes. Sampling at the index station revealed that the proportion of live unionids declined from 53% in September 1989 to 17% in May–June 1990 and to 0% in September 1990: this 100% mortality coincided with heavy infestation by zebra mussels. Quantitative sampling with a Ponar grab at the 17 stations in 1991 revealed a widespread and dramatic reduction in unionid populations. In 1982, five unionid species occurred at 35% of the stations at a density of 4/m2, whereas in 1991, no live unionid...
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Burrowing mayflies of the genus Hexagenia spp. were widely distributed (ca. 80% of sites) and abundant (ca. 160 nymphs/m2) in the western basin of Lake Erie of the Laurentian Great Lakes in 1929–1930, prior to a period of anoxia in the mid 1950s. Nymphs were absent or rare in the basin between 1961 and 1973–1975. In 1979–1991, nymphs were infrequently found (13–46% of sites) in low abundance (3–40 nymphs/m2) near shore (<7.5 km from shore), but were absent or rare offshore (0–7% of sites at 0–1 nymphs/m2). Increased abundance occurred offshore between 1991 (0% of sites) and 1993 (52% of sites at 7/m2). Annual sampling, beginning in 1995, indicates that nymphs increased in both nearshore and offshore waters. By 1997,...
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In soft sediments, Dreissena spp. create firm substrate in the form of aggregates of living mussels (druses) that roll free on the sediments. Druses provide physical structure which increases habitat heterogeneity, and the mussels increase benthic organic matter through the production of pseudofeces and feces. Descriptive and experimental studies were used to determine: 1) whether the density of benthic invertebrates in soft sediments increased in the presence of druses, and 2) whether the invertebrate assemblage responded to the physical structure provided by a druse or to some biotic effect associated with the presence of living mussels. In core samples collected biweekly during summer in Presque Isle Bay, Erie,...
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The first finding of the amphipod Echinogammarus ischnus and the mussel Dreissena bugensis in Lake Michigan is documented. These two species are widespread and abundant in the lower lakes, but had not yet been reported from Lake Michigan. E. ischnus is generally considered a warm-water form that is typically associated wtih hard substrates and Dreissena clusters in the nearshore zone. Along the eastern shoreline of Lake Michigan, this species was present at rocky, breakwall habitats, along the entire north-south axis of the lake. Although not abundant, this species was also found at soft-bottom sites as deep as 94 m in the southern basin. The finding of this species in deep offshore waters apparently extends the...
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Invasive species such as zebra mussels pose a threat to the economies and environments of coastal and fresh-water habitats around the world. Consequently, it is important that government policies and programs be adequate to protect these waters from invaders. This chapter documents key events that took place in the early years (1988-1991) of zebra mussel colonization of the Laurentian Great Lakes and evaluates government responses (policies and programs) to this disruptive, invasive, freshwater species.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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Manayunkia speciosa has been a taxonomic curiosity for 150 years with little interest until 1977 when it was identified as an intermediate host of a fish parasite (Ceratomyxa shasta) responsible for fish mortalities (e.g., chinook salmon). Manayunkia was first reported in the Great Lakes in 1929. Since its discovery, the taxon has been reported in 50% (20 of 40 studies) of benthos studies published between 1960 and 2007. When found, Manayunkia comprised < 1% of benthos in 70% of examined studies. In one extensive study, Manayunkia occurred in only 26% of 378 sampled events (1991–2009). The taxon was found at higher densities in one area of Lake Erie (mean = 3658/m2) and Georgian Bay (1790/m2) than in five other...
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Dreissenid mussels invaded and colonized waters of the Laurentian Great Lakes during the late 1980s. Their colonization and resulting impact have been characterized as one of the most important ecological changes in freshwater systems in North America. The need for information on dreissenid mussels has grown during the past 2 decades, which has prompted the compilation of this bibliography. Two previous bibliographies of dreissenid mussels indicate average publication rates were 6 publications/year between 1771 and 1964 (1,180 in 194 y) and 30 publications/year between 1964 and 1993 (885 in 30 y). In the current bibliography, the average rate of publication doubled during the past 23 y (1989 to 2011) to 66 publications/year...
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Previous (1992-1994) surveys for native freshwater mussels (Unionidae) along main channels of the Detroit River showed that unionids had been extirpated from all but four sites in the upper reaches of the river due to impacts of dreissenid mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis). These four sites were surveyed again in 1998 using the same sampling method (timed-random searches) to determine if they may serve as ''refugia'' where unionids and dreissenids co-exist. Two additional sites were sampled using additional methods (excavated-quadrat and line-transect searches) for comparison with unpublished data collected in 1987 and 1990. A total of four individuals of four species (Actinonaias ligamentina, Cyclonaias...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: American Midland Naturalist
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The oligochaete fauna at 40 stations in western Lake Erie were collected in 1982 and compared to oligochaete fauna collected similarly in 1961. A total of 34 taxa, representing 18 Tubificidae and 16 Naididae, were identified. Changes in the proportions of low, moderate, and heavy polluted sediments, as determined by ranges of total numbers of oligochaetes, indicate that, in general, heavy pollution substantially decreased near shore and moderate pollution increased and low pollution decreased in open waters over the 21-year comparison. The most common taxon, the eutrophic species, Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri, decreased in abundance in open water, indicating decreased eutrophication, whereas the distribution and abundance...
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The tubificid genus Teneridrilus Holmquist, 1985 (subfamily Tubificinae) is redefined. The genus was originally monotypic for the type species, formerly classified as Ilyodrilus mastix Brinkhurst, 1978. The genus now includes Teneridrilus columbiensis, a new combination for Isochaetides columbiensis, and two new species. The first of these, Teneridrilus calvus, is described by Erseus and Brinkhurst, and the second, Teneridrilus flexus, by Erseus and Hiltunen. Synapomorphies for the genus are strongly modified chaetae in II and an enlarged eversible pharnyx. The genus is distributed from China to British Columbia, Washington and California in freshwater near the mouths of large rivers, and in the St. Marys River,...
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Two exotic species of dreissenid mussels (Dreissena polymorpha and D. bugensis) began to colonize bottom substrates in Presque Isle Bay, Lake Erie in 1990. By 1991, all native unionid (Unionidae) shells were infested by dreissenids. In 1990 and 1991, about 500 individual unionids of 15 species were collected: in 1992, 246 individuals of 12 species were collected; in 1993, 64 individuals of 6 species; in 1994, three individuals of three species; and in 1995, no unionids were found. In general, infestation indices of unionids were relatively low in 1990 and 1991, increased in 1992, and decreased in 1993. Mortality of unionids associated with infestation in the bay occurred in a shorter period of time (ca. two to three...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Northeastern Naturalist
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In 1989, zebra mussels received national attention in North America when they reached densities exceeding 750,000/m2 in a water withdrawal facility along the shore of western Lake Erie of the Laurentian Great Lakes. Although water withdrawal problems caused by zebra mussels have been of immediate concern, ecological impacts attributed to mussels are likely to be the more important long-term issue for surface waters in North America. To date, the epizoic colonization (i.e., infestation) of unionid bivalve mollusks by zebra mussels has caused the most direct and severe ecological impact. Infestation of and resulting impacts caused by zebra mussels on unionids in the Great Lakes began in 1988. By 1990, mortality of...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: American Zoologist


map background search result map search result map Distribution and abundance of freshwater polychaetes, Manayunkia speciosa (Polychaeta), in the Great Lakes with a 70-year case history for western Lake Erie Interactions between an exotic ecosystem engineer (<i>Dreissena</i> spp.) and native burrowing mayflies (<i>Hexagenia</i> spp.) in soft sediments of western Lake Erie Interactions between an exotic ecosystem engineer (<i>Dreissena</i> spp.) and native burrowing mayflies (<i>Hexagenia</i> spp.) in soft sediments of western Lake Erie Distribution and abundance of freshwater polychaetes, Manayunkia speciosa (Polychaeta), in the Great Lakes with a 70-year case history for western Lake Erie