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The Mokelumne River basin of central California comprises portions of the California Trough and the Sierra Nevada section of the Pacific Mountain system. The California Trough is divisible into four subsections-the Delta tidal plain, the Victor alluvial plain, tlie river flood plains and channels, and the Arroyo Seco dissected pediment. These four subsections comprise the land forms produced by the Mokelumne River and other streams since the Sierra Nevada attained its present height in the Pleistocene epoch. The Victor alluvial plain rises eastward from the Delta plain and abuts on the dissected Arroyo Seco pediment; in the Mokelumne area it is 12 to 16 miles wide and slopes between 5 and 8 feet in a mile. It includes...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Water Supply Paper
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The prolonged drought of 1942-56 affected chiefly the lower part of the Colorado River basin and did not extend into the upper basin (the chief water-producing area) until 1953. Areas served by the Colorado River had adequate water supplies in spite of the local deficiency of precipitation. In the Gila River basin, there was a deficiency of streamflow during the drought years, and the water requirements of the present population exceed the yield of the basin even during years of average precipitation; the deficiency is overcome by mining of ground water.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Professional Paper
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Most people in the California Region live in a semiarid or arid climate, with precipitation less than the potential evapotranspiration- environments of perennial water deficiency. The deficiency becomes most onerous during the characteristically rainless summers and during recurrent droughts that may continue for 10--20 years. However, water from winter rain and snow can be stored for use during the dry summer months, and water stored during a wet climatic period can be used in a succeeding dry period; moreover, perennial deficiency can be overcome by bringing water from areas of perennial surplus. Ground-water reservoirs have especial significance in arid and semiarid regions as repositories where water is stored...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Professional Paper
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Cedar City Valley and Parowan Valley are situated in the eastern part of Iron County, in southwestern Utah. Both valleys are traversed by United States Highway 91, which skirts the west base of the High Plateaus of Utah. The sparse population of the valleys is chiefly dependent upon agricultural products for its livelihood. The climate of the region ranges from arid to semiarid, and the agricultural products are dependent upon irrigation by surface streams and, to an increasing extent during recent years, by water pumped from wells.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Water Supply Paper
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During the past few years of drouth the importance of ground-water supplies has become more fully appreciated. During this time, because of subnormal replenishment of the ground-water reservoirs and the increased withdrawals from wells, the ground-water levels have declined in most developed areas in the State, a condition which has made the well owners acutely aware that ground water is not inexhaustible. Numerous cases of contention between well owners resulted in increased demands for adequate regulation of the appropriation and use of ground water. Realizing that more information concerning the ground water of the State was imperative, not only to administer the ground-water regulations but to prepare for the...
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The effects of drought are most pronounced on soil moisture, because soil is the prime recipient of the water from precipitation, and upon streamflow, because it is the residual water that is not accepted by or that flows out from the soil and groundwater reservoirs. Studies by statistical correlation of records of natural streamflow and of dendrochronology indicate patterns of regional runoff that reflect precipitation trends in the principal meteorologic regions in the Southwest. By contrast, the effects of drought upon ground water vary with the natural characteristics and degree of utilization of individual aquifers.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Professional Paper
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This technical publication consists essentially of abstracts of more detailed reports which have been published. Reference to existing reports are given in the text and in the bibliography, page 114.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Technical Publication
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Generally, when people speak of water as a resource, they are considering its good aspects and recognizing that it is essential for life and living. Sometimes or at some places or to some people, the same water may be annoying or unpleasant and thus a nuisance-for example, rain at a picnic, snow at any time except Christmas Eve, ground water in a basement, floodwater inundating personal property, and any water after it has been polluted by somebody else. For purposes of this circular, water as a resource will be defined more broadly and as a nuisance more narrowly. Water is part of the natural resource base including all aspects of the land, the air, and the water that must be considered in planning if an environment...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Circular
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The effects of the recent drought 1942-56 have varied widely in the Southwestern basins of interior drainage which include, in addition to the Great Basin of Nevada, Utah, and California many smaller basins in Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. These closed basins are characteristically separate hydrologic units, and their water resources may logically be developed and regulated independently, which is not true of the subdivisions of the Rio Grande and Colorado River basin. Several topographically closed basins are independent hydrologic units with respect to surface water but are interconnected by ground-water circulation.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Professional Paper
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I feel that there is not a large gap between what we have and what we need for "management" of the people who must give their assent to any program for management of water resources. We need a "generalist" approach in addition to our specialist approach, to achieve a synthesis of the results of the specialist's analysis of specific problems. And as a means of developing these generalists, closer coordination or perhaps "combined operations" of groups of specialists in diverse fields might provide the comprehensive and overall understanding which we need, and which is needed by the general public.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Open-File Report
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The Bountiful district in Davis County, Utah, less than 10 miles from the heart of Salt Lake City, is rapidly becoming an integral part of the metropolitan area of Salt Lake City. It cannot achieve the development that its location merits unless the present water supplies are increased. The district is a fertile agricultural area favorably situated between the largest cities in the intermountain area and athwart the major routes of transportation and communication, but development of its residential, industrial, and agricultural potentialities will be restricted until existing water resources are supplemented by importation from other drainage basins that now have surplus water supplies. This conclusion is reached...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Technical Publication
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The effects of drought upon ground-water storage and discharge, and upon streamflow, vary tremendously in the central third of Texas (the area from the Panhandle to the Gulf of Mexico). Extremes are represented by (a) the Llano Estacado, where the drought had negligible effect upon ground-water resources, which are being progressively depleted by pumping for irrigation; and (b) the Balcones fault-zone aquifer west of San Antonio, whose storage and natural discharge declined substantially during the drought, but increased even more rapidly during succeeding years of more abundant precipitation.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Professional Paper
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The users of wells for irrigation in Pavant Valley, particularly in the Flowell district, have long been cognizant of their utter dependency upon ground water for livelihood, and were among the first in the State to make an organized effort to conserve supplies by prevention of waste. Since passage of the State ground-water law in 1935, the State Engineer has not approved applications for new wells in the areas of most concentrated development, and has deferred adjudication of existing water rights until adequate data concerning the ground-water resources become available. The investigation of ground-water resources in Pavant Valley was suggested by the State Engineer and constitutes one of a series that are being...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Technical Publication
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Throughout human history various laws and customs have developed concerning the individual rights and rights in common to the waters of the earth. Many existing laws and concepts are clearly influenced by the environment in which they originated and reflect the relative abundance or scarcity of water. Many concepts reflect the people's original interests in the water and once established have been passed from generation to generation with little modification. Some laws and concepts have been carried by people in their migrations and colonial expansions to vastly different environments, with rather curious consequences. In many places water laws that had been well adapted to the natural environment have become less...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Circular
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Lake Bonneville was a vast Pleistocene lake that covered 20,000 square miles in northwestern Utah and had a maximum depth of about 1,000 feet. It was a body of water comparable in size to modern Lake Michigan.Surveys of the unconsolidated deposits in the Lake Bonneville basin utilize the same methods used in studies of hard rocks, namely: separation of the deposits into mappable units and contacts between formations; observations of lateral and vertical changes in lithology; and plotting of these data on the map.
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Professional Paper
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The drought 1945-56 in California affected principally the southern part of the State, and was one of a series that has been recorded in the past century. Although the precipitation in any individual year is not predictable, the pattern of alternating wetter and drier periods is consistent enough that there is clearly a- need for storing the surpluses of wetter periods to provide adequate water supplies in dry years. This cyclic storage is a basic element in the California water plan. Wherever the storage increments in wet years provide adequate supplies throughout the periods of precipitation deficiency, the effect of drought upon mankind has been overcome, or at least minimized. However, whenever the deficiency...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Professional Paper


map background search result map search result map Geology and ground-water hydrology of the Mokelumne area, California Geology and ground-water hydrology of the Mokelumne area, California