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Filters: Contacts: R.A. Bailey (X)

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On May 25, 1980, the resort town of Mammoth Lakes, California, was shaken by a remarkable 48-hour-long earthquake sequence that included four M=6, two M=5 and 300 M=3 quakes. The nature of the precursory seismicity plus the unusual character of the May 25-27 sequence itself suggested that it was not typical of tectonic earthquakes in the region. Discovery of 25 cm of domical uplift centred on the resurgent dome within Long Valley caldera strongly implied that this activity was accompanied, if not caused, by influex of magma into the Long Valley magma chamber. -Authors
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Geoscience Canada
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Evidence that the diamicton at Deadman Pass is not till includes the following: (1) distribution of the diamicton is limited to areas underlain by the distinctive clast-rich lower pyroclastic member of the quartz latite of San Joaquin Ridge, (2) clasts in the diamicton and in the lower pyroclastic member are identical, (3) clast lithologies in the diamicton reflect nearby sources, (4) glacial deposits are absent in well-exposed sections of the lower pyroclastic member, and (5) formation of diamicton from present-day weathering and mass wasting of outcrops of the lower pyroclastic member can be observed locally. -from Authors
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Previous models of degassing, cooling and compaction of rhyolitic ash flow deposits are combined in a single computational model that runs on a personal computer. The model applies to a broader range of initial and boundary conditions than Riehle's earlier model, which did not integrate heat and mass flux with compaction and which for compound units was limited to two deposits. Model temperatures and gas pressures compare well with simple measured examples. The results indicate that degassing of volatiles present at deposition occurs within days to a few weeks. Compaction occurs for weeks to two to three years unless halted by devitrification; near-emplacement temperatures can persist for tens of years in the interiors...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Bulletin of Volcanology
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The Reporoa Caldera occupies the northern end of the Reporoa Depression, previously described as a tectonic fault-angle depression. Earlier confirmation of the topographic basin as a caldera had been hindered by the lack of an associated young pyroclastic flow deposit of large enough volume to have caused caldera collapse. New exposures on the eastern margin of the Reporoa basin reveal thick lithic lag breccias (>30 m) interbedded within the 0.24 Ma Kaingaroa Ignimbrites. These ignimbrites were previously attributed to the adjacent Okataina Volcanic Centre. Lag breccia thicknesses and maximum clast sizes decrease rapidly outward from the caldera rim, and discrete breccias are absent from ignimbrite sections more...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Bulletin of Volcanology
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Recent seismicity and ground uplift in the area are described. A comparison with other areas in the Cascades is made and the possibility of the Long Valley Magma Chamber as a source for eruptions is discussed. -P.N.Chroston
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Volcano monitoring and volcanic-hazards studies have received greatly increased attention in the United States in the past few years. Before 1980, the Volcanic Hazards Program was primarily focused on the active volcanoes of Kilauea and Mauna Loa, Hawaii, which have been monitored continuously since 1912 by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. After the reawakening and catastrophic eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980, the program was substantially expanded as the government and general public became aware of the potential for eruptions and associated hazards within the conterminous United States. Integrated components of the expanded program include: volcanic-hazards assessment; volcano monitoring; fundamental research;...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Journal of Geodynamics
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Geological, chronological, and structural studies of the Long Valley-Mono/Inyo Craters area document a long history of related volcanic eruptions and earthquakes controlled by regional extensional tectonics of the Basin and Range province. This activity has persisted for hundreds of thousands of years and is likely to continue. The Long Valley magma chamber had a volume approaching 3000 km3 prior to its climatic caldera-forming eruption 0.7 ma but has been reduced to less than a third of this volume by cooling, eruption, and crystallization. Although current unrest is concentrated in the S moat of Long Valley caldera, the Inyo/Mono Craters probably hold a greater potential for producing an eruption in the foreseeable...


    map background search result map search result map Preliminary geologic map and cross-sections of Casa Diablo geothermal area, Long Valley Caldera, Mono County, California Preliminary geologic map and cross-sections of Casa Diablo geothermal area, Long Valley Caldera, Mono County, California