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The Paunsaugunt Plateau in southern Utah is home to a prolific mule deer herd numbering around 5,200 individuals in 2019. In early October, these mule deer begin their migration from the Plateau traveling south distances up to 78 miles to winter range in the Buckskin Mountains near the Utah-Arizona border. Approximately 20-30% of the Paunsaugunt Plateau herd reside in northern Arizona during the winter, sharing winter range also used by deer from the Kaibab Plateau herd. Beginning in late April, deer reverse their migration to summer range on the Plateau. The most significant challenge for these deer is US Highway 89 which bisects this migration corridor and winter range, where deer-vehicle collisions have historically...
Mule deer of the Kaibab North herd on the Kaibab Plateau are treasured for their historic and contemporary significance in North America. They are the densest population of mule deer in Arizona, with an estimate of 10,200 individuals in 2019. This report compiles two research efforts, the first completed by Arizona Game and Fish Department in 2014, and the second from Utah Division of Wildlife’s ongoing research started in 2017. The Kaibab Plateau is bound on the east, south, and west by vertical canyon walls which run along the Colorado River and Kanab Creek. The Kaibab North Deer herd winters among pinyon-juniper, sagebrush, and cliffrose landscapes along the west, east, and northern extents of the plateau. Portions...
In 2008, 13 mule deer were GPS collared near the South Rim of the Grand Canyon to understand the impact of Arizona’s State Route 64 on mule deer movement. Unexpectedly, 4 individuals migrated over 50 miles to summer range near the San Francisco Peaks, north of Flagstaff, containing alpine, subalpine, and ponderosa pine habitats. The GPS collars dropped in 2009, but questions surrounding this long-distance migration remained. In June of 2019, the Arizona Game and Fish Department GPS collared 20 mule deer from the San Francisco Peaks herd on their summer range in Game Management Unit 7E/7W, where an estimated 5,300 mule deer reside. The primary challenges to mule deer in this migration corridor are related to navigating...
In 2008, 13 mule deer were GPS collared near the South Rim of the Grand Canyon to understand the impact of Arizona’s State Route 64 on mule deer movement. Unexpectedly, 4 individuals migrated over 50 miles to summer range near the San Francisco Peaks, north of Flagstaff, containing alpine, subalpine, and ponderosa pine habitats. The GPS collars dropped in 2009, but questions surrounding this long-distance migration remained. In June of 2019, the Arizona Game and Fish Department GPS collared 20 mule deer from the San Francisco Peaks herd on their summer range in Game Management Unit 7E/7W, where an estimated 5,300 mule deer reside. The primary challenges to mule deer in this migration corridor are related to navigating...
The Paunsaugunt Plateau in southern Utah is home to a prolific mule deer herd numbering around 5,200 individuals in 2019. In early October, these mule deer begin their migration from the Plateau traveling south distances up to 78 miles to winter range in the Buckskin Mountains near the Utah-Arizona border. Approximately 20-30% of the Paunsaugunt Plateau herd reside in northern Arizona during the winter, sharing winter range also used by deer from the Kaibab Plateau herd. Beginning in late April, deer reverse their migration to summer range on the Plateau. The most significant challenge for these deer is US Highway 89 which bisects this migration corridor and winter range, where deer-vehicle collisions have historically...
Mule deer of the Kaibab North herd on the Kaibab Plateau are treasured for their historic and contemporary significance in North America. They are the densest population of mule deer in Arizona, with an estimate of 10,200 individuals in 2019. This report compiles two research efforts, the first completed by Arizona Game and Fish Department in 2014, and the second from Utah Division of Wildlife’s ongoing research started in 2017. The Kaibab Plateau is bound on the east, south, and west by vertical canyon walls which run along the Colorado River and Kanab Creek. The Kaibab North Deer herd winters among pinyon-juniper, sagebrush, and cliffrose landscapes along the west, east, and northern extents of the plateau. Portions...
The Interstate 17 (I-17) elk herd primarily resides in Arizona’s GMU 6A and 11M south of Flagstaff. The population estimate for elk in GMU 6A was 6,500 in 2019. Their summer range consists of gentle topography with ponderosa pine forest and interspersed riparian-meadow habitat. Annually, the I-17 elk herd migrates an average of 24 miles to lower-elevation winter range dominated by pinyon-juniper habitat. This winter habitat is located along Oak Creek Canyon to the west and Wet Beaver Creek to the south. The I-17 elk herd faces high road mortality, averaging around 80 mortalities from vehicles per year (Gagnon et al 2013). Despite the high incidence of elk-vehicle collisions along I-17, road crossings are generally...
In 2008, 13 mule deer were GPS collared near the South Rim of the Grand Canyon to understand the impact of Arizona’s State Route 64 on mule deer movement. Unexpectedly, 4 individuals migrated over 50 miles to summer range near the San Francisco Peaks, north of Flagstaff, containing alpine, subalpine, and ponderosa pine habitats. The GPS collars dropped in 2009, but questions surrounding this long-distance migration remained. In June of 2019, the Arizona Game and Fish Department GPS collared 20 mule deer from the San Francisco Peaks herd on their summer range in Game Management Unit 7E/7W, where an estimated 5,300 mule deer reside. The primary challenges to mule deer in this migration corridor are related to navigating...
Interest in the movement of pronghorn south of Arizona’s Interstate 40 (I-40) began when telemetry data from 1999 – 2004 showed seasonal round-trip movements upwards of 100 miles. In 2018, high-resolution GPS location data confirmed persistence of this remarkable pronghorn migration. This herd resides primarily in Game Management Unit 8, which had a population estimate of 400 individuals in 2019. Unlike traditional summer-winter range dynamics, this pronghorn population uses a complex of several important seasonal ranges during their annual movements, which are connected by narrow corridors. The herd has high fidelity to these corridors, which elevates the importance of research and management efforts to conserve...
This is the data archive for the publication Ungulate Migrations of the Western United States, Volume 1 (Kauffman et al. 2020) and includes the collection of GIS map files that are mapped and described in the report. These map files are meant to provide a common spatial representation of the mapped migrations. This data release provides the means for ungulate migrations to be mapped and planned for across a wide variety of landscapes where they occur. Due to data sharing constraints of participating agencies, not all the files that underlie the mapped migrations included in the report have been released. Data can be viewed at: https://westernmigrations.net. Data in this archive can be downloaded two ways. To download...
Mule deer of the Kaibab North herd on the Kaibab Plateau are treasured for their historic and contemporary significance in North America. They are the densest population of mule deer in Arizona, with an estimate of 10,200 individuals in 2019. This report compiles two research efforts, the first completed by Arizona Game and Fish Department in 2014, and the second from Utah Division of Wildlife’s ongoing research started in 2017. The Kaibab Plateau is bound on the east, south, and west by vertical canyon walls which run along the Colorado River and Kanab Creek. The Kaibab North Deer herd winters among pinyon-juniper, sagebrush, and cliffrose landscapes along the west, east, and northern extents of the plateau. Portions...
In 2008, 13 mule deer were GPS collared near the South Rim of the Grand Canyon to understand the impact of Arizona’s State Route 64 on mule deer movement. Unexpectedly, 4 individuals migrated over 50 miles to summer range near the San Francisco Peaks, north of Flagstaff, containing alpine, subalpine, and ponderosa pine habitats. The GPS collars dropped in 2009, but questions surrounding this long-distance migration remained. In June of 2019, the Arizona Game and Fish Department GPS collared 20 mule deer from the San Francisco Peaks herd on their summer range in Game Management Unit 7E/7W, where an estimated 5,300 mule deer reside. The primary challenges to mule deer in this migration corridor are related to navigating...
Interest in the movement of pronghorn south of Arizona’s Interstate 40 (I-40) began when telemetry data from 1999 – 2004 showed seasonal round-trip movements upwards of 100 miles. In 2018, high-resolution GPS location data confirmed persistence of this remarkable pronghorn migration. This herd resides primarily in Game Management Unit 8, which had a population estimate of 400 individuals in 2019. Unlike traditional summer-winter range dynamics, this pronghorn population uses a complex of several important seasonal ranges during their annual movements, which are connected by narrow corridors. The herd has high fidelity to these corridors, which elevates the importance of research and management efforts to conserve...
The Paunsaugunt Plateau in southern Utah is home to a prolific mule deer herd numbering around 5,200 individuals in 2019. In early October, these mule deer begin their migration from the Plateau traveling south distances up to 78 miles to winter range in the Buckskin Mountains near the Utah-Arizona border. Approximately 20-30% of the Paunsaugunt Plateau herd reside in northern Arizona during the winter, sharing winter range also used by deer from the Kaibab Plateau herd. Beginning in late April, deer reverse their migration to summer range on the Plateau. The most significant challenge for these deer is US Highway 89 which bisects this migration corridor and winter range, where deer-vehicle collisions have historically...
Interest in the movement of pronghorn south of Arizona’s Interstate 40 (I-40) began when telemetry data from 1999 – 2004 showed seasonal round-trip movements upwards of 100 miles. In 2018, high-resolution GPS location data confirmed persistence of this remarkable pronghorn migration. This herd resides primarily in Game Management Unit 8, which had a population estimate of 400 individuals in 2019. Unlike traditional summer-winter range dynamics, this pronghorn population uses a complex of several important seasonal ranges during their annual movements, which are connected by narrow corridors. The herd has high fidelity to these corridors, which elevates the importance of research and management efforts to conserve...
The Paunsaugunt Plateau in southern Utah is home to a prolific mule deer herd numbering around 5,200 individuals in 2019. In early October, these mule deer begin their migration from the Plateau traveling south distances up to 78 miles to winter range in the Buckskin Mountains near the Utah-Arizona border. Approximately 20-30% of the Paunsaugunt Plateau herd reside in northern Arizona during the winter, sharing winter range also used by deer from the Kaibab Plateau herd. Beginning in late April, deer reverse their migration to summer range on the Plateau. The most significant challenge for these deer is US Highway 89 which bisects this migration corridor and winter range, where deer-vehicle collisions have historically...
Mule deer of the Kaibab North herd on the Kaibab Plateau are treasured for their historic and contemporary significance in North America. They are the densest population of mule deer in Arizona, with an estimate of 10,200 individuals in 2019. This report compiles two research efforts, the first completed by Arizona Game and Fish Department in 2014, and the second from Utah Division of Wildlife’s ongoing research started in 2017. The Kaibab Plateau is bound on the east, south, and west by vertical canyon walls which run along the Colorado River and Kanab Creek. The Kaibab North Deer herd winters among pinyon-juniper, sagebrush, and cliffrose landscapes along the west, east, and northern extents of the plateau. Portions...
The Interstate 17 (I-17) elk herd primarily resides in Arizona’s GMU 6A and 11M south of Flagstaff. The population estimate for elk in GMU 6A was 6,500 in 2019. Their summer range consists of gentle topography with ponderosa pine forest and interspersed riparian-meadow habitat. Annually, the I-17 elk herd migrates an average of 24 miles to lower-elevation winter range dominated by pinyon-juniper habitat. This winter habitat is located along Oak Creek Canyon to the west and Wet Beaver Creek to the south. The I-17 elk herd faces high road mortality, averaging around 80 mortalities from vehicles per year (Gagnon et al 2013). Despite the high incidence of elk-vehicle collisions along I-17, road crossings are generally...
The Interstate 17 (I-17) elk herd primarily resides in Arizona’s GMU 6A and 11M south of Flagstaff. The population estimate for elk in GMU 6A was 6,500 in 2019. Their summer range consists of gentle topography with ponderosa pine forest and interspersed riparian-meadow habitat. Annually, the I-17 elk herd migrates an average of 24 miles to lower-elevation winter range dominated by pinyon-juniper habitat. This winter habitat is located along Oak Creek Canyon to the west and Wet Beaver Creek to the south. The I-17 elk herd faces high road mortality, averaging around 80 mortalities from vehicles per year (Gagnon et al 2013). Despite the high incidence of elk-vehicle collisions along I-17, road crossings are generally...
The Interstate 17 (I-17) elk herd primarily resides in Arizona’s GMU 6A and 11M south of Flagstaff. The population estimate for elk in GMU 6A was 6,500 in 2019. Their summer range consists of gentle topography with ponderosa pine forest and interspersed riparian-meadow habitat. Annually, the I-17 elk herd migrates an average of 24 miles to lower-elevation winter range dominated by pinyon-juniper habitat. This winter habitat is located along Oak Creek Canyon to the west and Wet Beaver Creek to the south. The I-17 elk herd faces high road mortality, averaging around 80 mortalities from vehicles per year (Gagnon et al 2013). Despite the high incidence of elk-vehicle collisions along I-17, road crossings are generally...


    map background search result map search result map Ungulate Migrations of the Western United States, Volume 1 Migration Stopovers of Elk in the Interstate 17 Herd in Arizona Migration Corridors of Elk in the Interstate 17 Herd in Arizona Winter Ranges of Elk in the Interstate 17 Herd in Arizona Migration Routes of Elk in the Interstate 17 Herd in Arizona Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the Kaibab North Herd in Arizona Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Kaibab North Herd in Arizona Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the Kaibab North Herd in Arizona Migration Corridors of Mule Deer in the San Francisco Peaks Herd in Arizona Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the San Francisco Peaks Herd in Arizona Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the San Francisco Peaks Herd in Arizona Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the San Francisco Peaks Herd in Arizona Migration Routes of Pronghorn in the South of Interstate 40 Herd in Arizona Annual Ranges of Pronghorn in the South of Interstate 40 Herd in Arizona Migration Corridors of Pronghorn in the South of Interstate 40 Herd in Arizona Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the Paunsaugunt Plateau Herd in Utah Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Paunsaugunt Plateau Herd in Utah Migration Corridors of Mule Deer in the Paunsaugunt Plateau Herd in Utah Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the Paunsaugunt Plateau Herd in Utah Migration Corridors of Mule Deer in the Kaibab North Herd in Arizona Migration Stopovers of Elk in the Interstate 17 Herd in Arizona Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the San Francisco Peaks Herd in Arizona Migration Corridors of Pronghorn in the South of Interstate 40 Herd in Arizona Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the Kaibab North Herd in Arizona Migration Routes of Pronghorn in the South of Interstate 40 Herd in Arizona Migration Routes of Elk in the Interstate 17 Herd in Arizona Migration Corridors of Elk in the Interstate 17 Herd in Arizona Winter Ranges of Elk in the Interstate 17 Herd in Arizona Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the San Francisco Peaks Herd in Arizona Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the San Francisco Peaks Herd in Arizona Annual Ranges of Pronghorn in the South of Interstate 40 Herd in Arizona Migration Corridors of Mule Deer in the San Francisco Peaks Herd in Arizona Winter Ranges of Mule Deer in the Paunsaugunt Plateau Herd in Utah Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the Kaibab North Herd in Arizona Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Kaibab North Herd in Arizona Migration Corridors of Mule Deer in the Kaibab North Herd in Arizona Migration Stopovers of Mule Deer in the Paunsaugunt Plateau Herd in Utah Migration Routes of Mule Deer in the Paunsaugunt Plateau Herd in Utah Migration Corridors of Mule Deer in the Paunsaugunt Plateau Herd in Utah Ungulate Migrations of the Western United States, Volume 1