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Science Applications employs mdEditor for metadata creation and editing. Metadata for contacts of other DOI agencies and centers are used frequently across the USFWS regions. In an effort to reduce redundancy and increase efficiency, SA headquarters maintains a master mdJSON metadata file aka seed file. for use across SA regions and the Service.If you would like to add commonly used contacts to this list, please contact the SA HQ data manager at sadatamanager@fws.gov
As part of the March 29, 2018 appropriations bills, Congress directed the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) to obtain an independent assessment on the taxonomic status of the red wolf, Canis rufus, and the Mexican gray wolf, Canis lupus baileyi. Currently, the FWS considers the red wolf a valid taxonomic species and the Mexican gray wolf a valid taxonomic subspecies. Both the red wolf and the Mexican gray wolf are listed as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA; United States Public Law No. 93-205; United States Code Title 16 Section 1531 et seq.). However, there is ongoing debate about their taxonomic status.Major barriers to the capability of FWS to re-establish healthy populations of wild wolves...
Collaborative approach to the evaluation of empirical evidence from private land forestry landscapes on the value of sustainable forestry management for sustaining species at risk, specifically through demonstration projects in six DOI Unified Regions. Projects are evaluating the role of sustainable forest management practices on key species occurring in landscapes dominated by lands owned by NAFO members.Six projects are evaluating the role of sustainable forest management practices on key species.
The Qawalangin Tribe of Unalaska (QTU), a federally recognized sovereign nation located in the Aleutian Chain, Alaska,relies on a subsistence lifestyle for food security, traditional and cultural values, and economic benefits. However,subsistence foods and public health is currently at risk due to the confirmed detection of the Avian Influenza (HPAI) in redfox and eagles from Unalaska. Given that Alaska has been identified as a point of entry for Asian-origin influenza virusesinto North America, which has resulted in at least one fatality, zoonotic exposure to avian-origin influenza viruses is animportant human health concern. QTU plans to develop a team with tribal, city, Ounalashka Corporation, and state andfederal...
The people of the Lummi Nation are strongly connected to their cultural and traditional foods, including animals, berries, birds, fish, plants, and shellfish that physically and spiritually sustain them as people. Disease spread amongst these important wildlife species is a direct threat to the Lummi Community, their way of life, and their goal to maintain and defend treaty rights, including hunting and fishing within traditional hunting and gathering areas. The Wildlife Division was recently added to the Lummi Natural Resources (LNR) Department with the goal of further defending and protecting treaty rights related to wildlife, hunting, and gathering. In order to properly manage wildlife amongst current and future...
The Karuk Tribe’s Ithivthaneenyav, One Good Earth, Indigenous Wildlife Health Infrastructure Project will create a landscape level Indigenous-led Wildlife Health Plan across 1.049 million acres of Karuk Aboriginal Lands. The plan development will entail research and monitoring, sample gathering and data analysis, and capacity and infrastructure building of the Karuk Tribe Department of Natural Resources Wildlife Division to better understand the ecology of disease transmission along the human-wildlife interface pertaining to ticks, deer, and elk. It will be modeled from the University of California, Davis One Health Institute approach which is directly aligned with the Karuk stewardship ethic of sustainably using...
Capture mule deer, elk, and pronghorn in priority herds to attach GPS radio collars, and analyze those data to understand migration patterns, stopover areas, and seasonal habitats, 2) deploy trail cameras on existing herds to quantify use of wildlife crossing structures, 3) purchase remote sensing imagery and analysis of mule deer and pronghorn GPS collars to identify conflict areas with feral equids, and 4) conduct habitat evaluation of stopover sites where prior habitat improvement treatments have been conducted.
Globally, the health of our marine ecosystems is at risk. Through anthropogenic activities, our society has created a perfect storm of conditions that facilitate the emergence of zoonotic diseases (diseases shared by animals and humans) and other health threats. For instance, warming oceans are causing the collapse of marine food webs necessary to sustain healthy wildlife populations and the economies and livelihoods of humans residing in coastal communities. In addition, runoff and sewage introduce contaminants and novel diseases, and contribute to the frequency and severity of algal blooms harmful to the health of people and animals. Promoting healthy oceans has been a major focus of several recent initiatives,...
Many Native Nations are restoring buffalo to Tribal lands for a wide variety of purposes, including as atraditional, cultural, and nutritious food source. Many conduct field buffalo harvests, where meat is harvestedoutside of the processing plant setting, often by buffalo program staff and sometimes community members directly.At the same time, buffalos’ increasing population means that growing numbers of communicable diseases have beenimpacting herds. Many of these diseases are zoonotic, having the potential to cross species and impact humans aswell as buffalo. This increasing instance of human/wildlife interface – at the cultural buffalo harvest – createsa growing opportunity for emerging zoonotic diseases to impact...
Healthy ecosystems benefit people, plants, domestic animals, and wildlife in Alabama. Diseases impact agriculture, public health and wildlife conservation. Focusing upon this subject, the Alabama Departments of Agriculture and Industries, Conservation and Natural Resources, and Public Health, together with Auburn University, will form a new coalition to develop a One Health framework to prepare and safeguard against current and emerging infectious disease threats. Our objectives center around enhanced surveillance, prevention, control, applied research, and training on wildlife health issues throughout the state.
This project aims to increase our agency’s ability to detect and respond to wildlife diseases by increasing ourresponse capability, improving our capacity for surveillance and diagnostics, and adding dedicated resourcesdedicated to managing our data and communications needs. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission’s(FWC) Fish and Wildlife Health (FWH) team is tasked with preventing, detecting, and managing diseases ofwildlife, responding to stakeholder needs, and determining the extent of disease impacts and the risk posed toother species including domestic animals and people. With a small but dedicated staff, we respond to wildlifehealth need in a heavily populated yet ecosystem rich state that strectches...
The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) is the lead applicant agency and will work through the Centerfor Climate and Health (an ANTHC / Alaska Pacific University (APU) partnership), to implement the “DevelopingTribal Capacity for Zoonotic Disease Preparedness and Response - A One Health Initiative” project with a goal ofincreasing interagency collaboration, surveillance, and tribal engagement in the preparation for and response tozoonotic diseases in Alaska. Alaska Native (AN) people face unique and significant challenges from zoonoticdiseases due to subsistence harvesting practices that rely on the collection and consumption of traditionalfoods, limited health service access, social determinants of health,...
Zoonotic diseases account for more than 70% of infectious diseases worldwide. In the United States, avian influenza viruses such as H5N1 and H1N1 hold the greatest pandemic potential of known virus groups; therefore, bolstering the ability to monitor and predict potential spillover events from wildlife will be integral for taking steps to prevent human and domestic infection. This will require strong communication among stakeholders, the capacity to conduct active surveillance research, and having adequate supplies and equipment for quickly responding to disease events. As such, this multi-agency project aims to 1) build a communication network among stakeholders for rapid dissemination of wildlife disease events,...
Zoonotic Initiative Grants 2022
Scientists strive to develop clear rules for naming and grouping living organisms. But taxonomy, the scientific study of biological classification and evolution, is often highly debated. Members of a species, the fundamental unit of taxonomy and evolution, share a common evolutionary history and a common evolutionary path to the future. Yet, it can be difficult to determine whether the evolutionary history or future of a population is sufficiently distinct to designate it as a unique species.A species is not a fixed entity – the relationship among the members of the same species is only a snapshot of a moment in time. Different populations of the same species can be in different stages in the process of species...


    map background search result map search result map Projects Assessing the taxonomic status of the red wolf and the Mexican Gray wolf Western States Large Herbivore Migratory Corridor study (SO3362) Working Forests, Forest Sustainability, and At-risk Species through Collaborative Conservation Projects Working Forests, Forest Sustainability, and At-risk Species through Collaborative Conservation Western States Large Herbivore Migratory Corridor study (SO3362) Assessing the taxonomic status of the red wolf and the Mexican Gray wolf