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Remote camera data on snow presence, snow depth, and wildlife detections on Moscow Mountain in Latah County, ID, USA. Reconyx Hyperfire I and Hyperfire II cameras were used and set to take hourly timelapse images and motion-triggered images. The cameras were deployed from October 2020 - May 2021. Snow presence was assessed up to 15 m from the camera. Snow depth was measured using virtual snow stakes created with the edger R package created by the author. Wildlife were marked as present in all photos in which they appear, and new individuals were counted. Snow density was collected using a federal or prairie snow sampler. Snow hardness was collected using a ram penetrometer. Solar radiation was calculated using hemispherical...
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We collected snow density measurements at camera sites from December 2020 - April 2021, at the same time as snow hardness measurements. We took measurements every few weeks as logistics allowed. We took samples near the camera site in snow visually similar to the snow in the camera viewshed (the geographical area that is visible from a location) to prevent snow conditions from being disturbed beyond normal camera deployment. We took snow density samples using a homemade prairie sampler in snow depths < 100 cm and using a federal snow sampler in snow depths > 100 cm. The sampler was inserted into the snow to remove a snow core. We retained the core if the depth of snow in the sampler was at least 90% of the actual...
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UW_Olallie_photo_metadata & image files: These are the raw timelapse photographs. The date/time stamp is inaccurate for the camera deployed in the open (at the SNOTEL) due to a programming error. This timestamp is one day early (i.e., subtract 1 day from the timestamp when using these data). Also available is metadata for two timelapse cameras and their associated snow depth poles (two visible in each camera's field of view) deployed at Olallie Meadows SNOTEL during water year 2015. One camera was deployed in the open area that is the Olallie Meadows SNOTEL station (the snow pillow is in the field of view). The other camera was deployed in the adjacent forest, approximately 60 m to the southeast of the SNOTEL....
Abstract (from http://www.nature.com/articles/srep24441): The 170 National Forests and Grasslands (NFs) in the conterminous United States are public lands that provide important ecosystem services such as clean water and timber supply to the American people. This study investigates the potential impacts of climate change on two key ecosystem functions (i.e., water yield and ecosystem productivity) using the most recent climate projections derived from 20 Global Climate Models (GCMs) of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 (CMIP5). We find that future climate change may result in a significant reduction in water yield but an increase in ecosystem productivity in NFs. On average, gross ecosystem productivity...
This recorded presentation is from the April 17, 2014 workshop for the "Integrated Scenarios of the Future Northwest Environment" project. The recording is available on YouTube. The Integrated Scenarios project is an effort to understand and predict the effects of climate change on the Northwest's climate, hydrology, and vegetation. The project was funded by the Northwest Climate Science Center and the Climate Impacts Research Consortium.
This management brief summarizes the results of a project evaluating the scientific body of research on climate adaptation actions relevant to ecological drought. This adaptation science assessment evaluated strategies developed and prioritized by participants at regional adaptation workshops by synthesizing supporting evidence from the literature. The brief presents findings on the benefits and limitations of these climate adaptation options from the accompanying report, Extremes to Ex-Streams: Ecological Drought Adaptation in a Changing Climate.
Abstract (from ScienceDirect): The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed the PRObability of Streamflow PERmanence (PROSPER) model, a GIS raster-based empirical model that provides streamflow permanence probabilities (probabilistic predictions) of a stream channel having year-round flow for any unregulated and minimally-impaired stream channel in the Pacific Northwest region, U.S. The model provides annual predictions for 2004–2016 at a 30-m spatial resolution based on monthly or annually updated values of climatic conditions and static physiographic variables associated with the upstream basin. Predictions correspond to any pixel on the channel network consistent with the medium resolution National Hydrography...
Monthly temperature and precipitation data from 41 global climate models (GCMs) of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) were compared to observations for the 20th century, with a focus on the U.S. Pacific Northwest (PNW) and surrounding region. A suite of statistics, or metrics, was calculated, including correlation and variance of mean seasonal spatial patterns, amplitude of seasonal cycle, diurnal temperature range, annual- to decadal-scale variance, long-term persistence, and regional teleconnections to El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Performance, or credibility, was assessed based on the GCMs' abilities to reproduce the observed metrics. GCMs were ranked in their credibility using two...
Abstract (from SpringerOpen): Wildfires in the Pacific Northwest (Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and western Montana, USA) have been immense in recent years, capturing the attention of resource managers, fire scientists, and the general public. This paper synthesizes understanding of the potential effects of changing climate and fire regimes on Pacific Northwest forests, including effects on disturbance and stress interactions, forest structure and composition, and post-fire ecological processes. We frame this information in a risk assessment context, and conclude with management implications and future research needs. Large and severe fires in the Pacific Northwest are associated with warm and dry conditions, and such...
Abstract (from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/hyp.10964/abstract): While the effects of land use change in urban areas have been widely examined, the combined effects of climate and land use change on the quality of urban and urbanizing streams have received much less attention. We describe a modelling framework that is applicable to the evaluation of potential changes in urban water quality and associated hydrologic changes in response to ongoing climate and landscape alteration. The grid-based spatially distributed model, Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model-Water Quality (DHSVM-WQ), is an outgrowth of DHSVM that incorporates modules for assessing hydrology and water quality in urbanized watersheds...
Climate change is already affecting species in many ways. Because individual species respond to climate change differently, some will be adversely affected by climate change whereas others may benefit. Successfully managing species in a changing climate will require an understanding of which species will be most and least impacted by climate change. Although several approaches have been proposed for assessing the vulnerability of species to climate change, it is unclear whether these approaches are likely to produce similar results. In this study, we compared the relative vulnerabilities to climate change of 76 species of birds, mammals, amphibians, and trees based on three different approaches to assessing vulnerability....
A warming climate, fire exclusion, and land cover changes are altering the conditions that produced historical fire regimes and facilitating increased recent wildfire activity in the northwestern United States. Understanding the impacts of changing fire regimes on forest recruitment and succession, species distributions, carbon cycling, and ecosystem services is critical, but challenging across broad spatial scales. One important and understudied aspect of fire regimes is the unburned area within fire perimeters; these areas can function as fire refugia across the landscape during and after wildfire by providing habitat and seed sources. With increasing fire activity, there is speculation that fire intensity and...
Wildfire refugia are forest patches that are minimally-impacted by fire and provide critical habitats for fire-sensitive species and seed sources for post-fire forest regeneration. Wildfire refugia are relatively understudied, particularly concerning the impacts of subsequent fires on existing refugia. We opportunistically re-visited 122 sites classified in 1994 for a prior fire refugia study, which were burned by two wildfires in 2012 in the Cascade mountains of central Washington, USA. We evaluated the fire effects for historically persistent fire refugia and compared them to the surrounding non-refugial forest matrix. Of 122 total refugial (43 plots) and non-refugial (79 plots) sites sampled following the 2012...
Knowledge of snow cover distribution and disappearance dates over a wide range of scales is imperative for understanding hydrological dynamics and for habitat management of wildlife species that rely on snow cover. Identification of snow refugia, or places with relatively late snow disappearance dates (SDDs) compared to surrounding areas, is especially important as climate change alters snow cover timing and duration. The purpose of this study was to increase understanding of snow refugia in complex terrain spanning the rain-snow transition zone at fine spatial and temporal scales. To accomplish this objective, we used remote cameras to provide relatively high temporal and spatial resolution measurements on snowpack...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
Climate change is altering fire regimes and post-fire conditions, contributing to relatively rapid transformation of landscapes across the western US. Studies are increasingly documenting post-fire vegetation transitions, particularly from forest to non-forest conditions or from sagebrush to invasive annual grasses. The prevalence of climate-driven, post-fire vegetation transitions is likely to increase in the future with major impacts on social–ecological systems. However, research and management communities have only recently focused attention on this emerging climate risk, and many knowledge gaps remain. We identify three key needs for advancing the management of post-fire vegetation transitions, including centering...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
Anthropogenic impacts have altered and degraded global ecosystems. Integrated resource management offers an important solution to enhance collaboration, holistic thinking, and equity by considering diverse perspectives in decision making. In Washington State, Floodplains by Design (FbD) is a floodplain management and habitat restoration program that emphasizes bringing together diverse stakeholders and supporting conversations between local, state, and Tribal governments while enhancing environmental justice in the region. Marginalized communities continue to be disproportionately impacted by environmental disturbances. Our project interviewed Tribal natural resource managers to assess the degree to which they felt...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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These data were used to examine how post-fire sedimentation might change in western USA watersheds with future fire from the decade of 2001-10 through 2041-50. The data include previously published projections (Hawbaker and Zhu, 2012a, b) of areas burned by future wildfires for several climate change scenarios and general circulation models (GCMs) that we summarized for 471 watersheds of the western USA. The data also include previously published predictions (Miller et al., 2011) of first year post-fire hillslope soil erosion from GeoWEPP that we summarized for 471 watersheds of the western USA. We synthesized these summarized data in order to project sediment yield from future fires for 471 watersheds through the...
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Hourly hydrometeorological data was collected over the 30-year period from 1984-2014 in Upper Sheep Creek, within the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed, Idaho, USA. These data were used to calibrate the one-dimensional Simultaneous Heat and Water (SHAW) model. These data and the SHAW calibration have previously been described in multiple publications, particularly Chauvin et al 2011 and Flerchinger et al 2016. In the dataset presented here, climate scenarios have been constructed, applied to the historic record, simulated in the SHAW model, and hydrologic results have been analyzed. These data include the following: (1) uscData. These are the historical data described above, prepared for input into the SHAW...
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UI_Mica_Location: Location metadata and meteorological and snow depth observations from met towers in the Mica Creek Experimental Forest. Data were collected at 7 different station sites at approximately half-hour intervals for water years 2003-2006, with discontinuous records due to equipment malfunction or damage. Stations were located within different forest harvest treatment sections, applied to the watershed in approximately 2001, including clear-cut harvest, partial harvest, and control sections (both second growth and old growth control forests). Site Data Citation for full description of the field campaign and sites. UI_Mica_met: Metadata and associated snow depth and SWE observations from 14 manual...


map background search result map search result map Long format snow course observations, meteorological sensor observations,locations, and associated metadata for Mica Creek, Idaho Timelapse photos at SNOTEL station, locations, and associated metadata, Ollalie Meadows, Wash., 2015 Hydrologic sensitivity to climate change and aspen mortality in Upper Sheep Creek, Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (21st century scenarios) Climate, Wildfire, and Erosion Data, Western US Snow Density Measurements at Remote Camera Stations on Moscow Mountain in Latah County, ID (12/1/20-4/30/21) Environmental Data at Remote Camera Stations on Moscow Mountain in Latah County, ID, USA (10/20/20-5/30/21) Timelapse photos at SNOTEL station, locations, and associated metadata, Ollalie Meadows, Wash., 2015 Snow Density Measurements at Remote Camera Stations on Moscow Mountain in Latah County, ID (12/1/20-4/30/21) Environmental Data at Remote Camera Stations on Moscow Mountain in Latah County, ID, USA (10/20/20-5/30/21) Long format snow course observations, meteorological sensor observations,locations, and associated metadata for Mica Creek, Idaho Hydrologic sensitivity to climate change and aspen mortality in Upper Sheep Creek, Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed (21st century scenarios) Climate, Wildfire, and Erosion Data, Western US