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This dataset represents ease of access to bottomland areas for vegetation treatments. Access may be by road, 4x4 near road, hike in by field crews or requiring overnight camping or raft access. Access is considered for each side of the river separately.
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This data set shows the extent of the Colorado River Conservation Planning project bottomland area as delineated by topography and vegetation, The bottomland area is subdivided into 1 km polygons measured from the upstream project boundary. Reach breaks were determined by large topographic shifts and/or tributary junctions by John Dohrenwend. Please see the project report for more details.
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This is a model showing general habitat diversity, including both the structural and cover type diversity. See Open File Report, Rasmussen and Shafroth, Colorado River Conservation Planning for geoprocessing details.
Environmental flows have become important restoration tools on regulated rivers. However, environmental flows are often constrained by other demands within the river system and thus typically are comprised of smaller water volumes than the natural flows they are meant to replace, which can limit their functional efficacy. We review environmental flow programs aimed at restoring riparian vegetation on four arid zone rivers: the Tarim River in China; the Bill Williams River in Arizona, U.S.; the delta of the Colorado River in Mexico; and the Murrumbidgee River in southern Australia. Our goal is to determine what worked and what did not work to accomplish restoration goals. The lower Tarim River in China formerly formed...
Final model for bat feeding plus all model component layers. For more detailed information, please visit this project's ScienceBase landing page at https://doi.org/10.5066/P927I36K, or the final report for this project at https://www.coloradomesa.edu/water-center/documents/rasmussen_shaftroth_2016_watercenter_cmu.pdf.
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This dataset represents the relative average amount of non-woody cover within 2 ha) of bottomland along the Colorado River from the Colorado state line (San Juan and Grand Counties, Utah) to the southern Canyonlands NP boundary, as of September 2010. Traditional image interpretation cues were used to develop the polygons, such as shape, size, pattern, tone, texture, color, and shadow, from high resolution, true color, aerial imagery (0.3m resolution), acquired for the project. Additional, public available aerial photos (NAIP, 2011) were used to cross-reference cover classes. As with any digital layer, this layer is a representation of what is actually occurring on the ground. Errors are inherent in any interpretation...
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This dataset represents the variety (unique structural classes: water, bare, herbaceous, short shrubs, medium shrubs, short trees, tall trees) within 1 ha of bottomland areas. Traditional image interpretation cues were used to develop the polygons, such as shape, size, pattern, tone, texture, color, and shadow, from high resolution, true color, aerial imagery (0.3m resolution), acquired for the project. Additional, public available aerial photos (NAIP, 2011) were used to cross-reference cover classes. As with any digital layer, this layer is a representation of what is actually occurring on the ground. Errors are inherent in any interpretation of ground qualities. Due to the "snapshot" nature of the aerial photos,...
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This map shows the channel boundary (2011) of the Colorado River mainstem between the Utah Colorado border and the upper pool of Lake Powell, Utah (146 miles). The channel boundary was mapped from public available NAIP imagery flown on June 28, 2011, when the river flow was 886 m3/s at the Cisco gage. The channel is subdivided into channel types: fast water (main channel, secondary channel), and still water types (backwater, isolated pool and tributary channel).
Tamarisk spatial data containing 9 rasters. Each of the rasters represent the following: 1) X1st_random - ensemble of 5 models with random background data and 1st percentile threshold 2) X10th_random - ensemble of 5 models with random background data and 10th percentile threshold 3) MaxSS_random - ensemble of 5 models with random background data and MaxSS threshold 4) X1st_Salix_1st - ensemble of 5 models with random background data and 1st percentile threshold 5) X10th_Salix - ensemble of 5 models with random background data and 10th percentile threshold 6) MaxSS_Salix - ensemble of 5 models with random background data and MaxSS threshold 7) X1st_combined - ensemble of 10 models with random and Salix background...
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Active channel as defined by remote sensing before (2010 and after (2011) a 40 year return period flood (December 2010) within the lower Virgin River, Nevada.
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This data release presents observations of riparian vegetation, topography, sediment quality, and river corridor geomorphology in four river reaches of the Lower Virgin River extending downstream 62 river kilometers (rkm) from near the town of Littlefield (AZ) and the Arizona-Nevada border at rkm 119. Methods included field observations and analysis of remotely-sensed data before (2010) and after (2011-2012) a 40-year return period flood (December 2010, at the gaging station “Virgin River near Littlefield” (USGS gage #09415000)). The data release includes four .csv files related to field observations: UTM coordinates of field transect locations; vegetation and geomorphology; species codes; and sediment quality....
Models showing estimated quality of habitat for rocky fringe snakes. For more detailed information, please visit this project's ScienceBase landing page at https://doi.org/10.5066/P927I36K, or the final report for this project at https://www.coloradomesa.edu/water-center/documents/rasmussen_shaftroth_2016_watercenter_cmu.pdf.
Final model for Cost of Restoration. For more detailed information, please visit this project's ScienceBase landing page at https://doi.org/10.5066/P927I36K, or the final report for this project at https://www.coloradomesa.edu/water-center/documents/rasmussen_shaftroth_2016_watercenter_cmu.pdf.
All layers used in construction of the Riparian Understory Models. For more detailed information, please visit this project's ScienceBase landing page at https://doi.org/10.5066/P927I36K, or the final report for this project at https://www.coloradomesa.edu/water-center/documents/rasmussen_shaftroth_2016_watercenter_cmu.pdf.
Habitat suitability model for species that prefer open land. For more detailed information, please visit this project's ScienceBase landing page at https://doi.org/10.5066/P927I36K, or the final report for this project at https://www.coloradomesa.edu/water-center/documents/rasmussen_shaftroth_2016_watercenter_cmu.pdf.
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These layers show the relative abundance of native, non-native and tree cover types as mapped for the Colorado River Conservation Planning Project. Relative abundance (Dominant, Common, Mapped by Sparse and Not Mapped) is determined by the listing of cover types per patch.
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Two models of fire risk are presented here. One shows risk of natural fire based on abundance of tamarisk and native trees only. The other shows risk of all fire, which includes abundance of tamarisk and native trees, but also proximity of human ignition sources (roads and campgrounds). Associated layers of the river channel at low flow and bottomland boundaries are included for reference.
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This dataset represents the prevalence of trees as mapped along the Colorado River bottomland from the Colorado state line (San Juan and Grand Counties, Utah) to the southern Canyonlands NP boundary, as of September 2010. This mapping was conducted as part of the Colorado River Conservation Planning Project, a joint effort between the National Park Service, The Nature Conservancy, US Geological Survey, Bureau of Land Management, and Utah Forestry Fire and State Lands.
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This map shows stillness of water near bank vegetation within 15 m of the channel boundary (2011) of the Colorado River mainstem between the Utah Colorado border and the upper pool of Lake Powell, Utah (146 miles). The channel boundary was mapped from public available NAIP imagery flown on June 28, 2011, when the river flow was 886 m3/s at the Cisco gage. The channel is subdivided into channel types: main channel, secondary channel, backwater, isolated pool and tributary channel.


map background search result map search result map Estimated Risk of Fire on the Colorado River Bottomland in Utah Native, Non-native and Tree Abundance Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Stillness of water for Bat Watering Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - General Diversity Model Output Data for Colorado River in Utah Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Diversity of All Structural Types for General Diversity Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Open Areas for Open Land Species Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Prevalence of Trees for Riparian Overstory Layer Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Presence of Still Water Plus 20 m for Riparian Understory Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Access to the Site for Relative Cost of Restoration Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Bottomland Boundary of the Colorado River Divided at Homogeneous River Reaches Riparian vegetation, topography, sediment quality, and river corridor geomorphology in the Lower Virgin River, Nevada and Arizona, before (2010) and after (2011-2012) a 40-year return period flood Active channel in the Lower Virgin River before and after a 40 yr flood (December 2010) Riparian vegetation, topography, sediment quality, and river corridor geomorphology in the Lower Virgin River, Nevada and Arizona, before (2010) and after (2011-2012) a 40-year return period flood Active channel in the Lower Virgin River before and after a 40 yr flood (December 2010) Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Stillness of water for Bat Watering Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Open Areas for Open Land Species Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - General Diversity Model Output Data for Colorado River in Utah Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Diversity of All Structural Types for General Diversity Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Prevalence of Trees for Riparian Overstory Layer Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Access to the Site for Relative Cost of Restoration Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Presence of Still Water Plus 20 m for Riparian Understory Model Conservation Planning for the Colorado River in Utah - Bottomland Boundary of the Colorado River Divided at Homogeneous River Reaches Estimated Risk of Fire on the Colorado River Bottomland in Utah Native, Non-native and Tree Abundance