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Wildfire and fuel treatment locations for the USFWS Pacific Southwest Region (California, Nevada, Klamath Basin OR) extracted from the Fire Management Information System (FMIS) on October 23, 2015, for fiscal years 1980-2015.
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The purpose of this dataset is to display the physical boundaries of Fire Management Zones within the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Pacific Southwest Region.
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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/shoreline-change/), documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal...
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This portion of the USGS data release presents bathymetry data collected during surveys performed in northern Monterey Bay, California in March 2016 (USGS Field Activity Number 2016-627-FA). Bathymetry data were collected using two personal watercraft (PWCs) equipped with single-beam sonar systems and global navigation satellite system (GNSS) receivers. The sonar systems consisted of an Odom Echotrac CV-100 single-beam echosounder and 200 kHz transducer with a 9° beam angle. Raw acoustic backscatter returns were digitized by the echosounder with a vertical resolution of 1.25 cm. Depths from the echosounders were computed using sound velocity profiles measured using a YSI CastAway CTD during the survey. Positioning...
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The central Platte River Valley represents a key mid-latitude stopover This dataset supports a contemporary analysis of nocturnal roost selection for sandhill cranes staging along the Platte River during 2003-2007. We explored variation in selection for previously established characteristics of roost sites, including river channel width, vegetation height along the river bank, and distance to nearest disturbance feature. This analysis also included novel environmental factors (yearly estimates of corn near roost sites, nightly temperature, wind speed, and river discharge) and how they may interact with the more established characteristics.
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This data collection consists of a synthetic stream network and associated catchments developed as the foundation for a Spatially Referenced Regressions on Watershed Attributes (SPARROW) dissolved-solids source and transport model for the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB). The SPARROW model requires a hydrologically connected representation of a stream network through which loads are transported from an upstream reach to the next reach downstream (Schwarz and others, 2006; Moore and others, 2004). Each stream reach or segment within this synthetic stream network has an associated local drainage area or catchment used to calculate catchment characteristics that may have an effect on loads being modeled. The synthetic...
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Forest- Data collected once using GIS prior to fish sampling. Our approach was to focus the study on smaller, headwater catchments because larger streams drained areas containing both hemlock and mixed hardwood forest, making forest-specific comparison intractable. In addition, most of these larger watersheds were impacted by humans (e.g., impoundments, agriculture, quarries) that could confound our assessment of the influence of hemlock. Even after limiting the study to headwater catchments, other possible confounding factors remained; we controlled for landscape variability (i.e., terrain and stream size) through the sampling design and we excluded others (i.e., minimum catchment area,beaver activity) through...
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‚ÄčThe basis for these features is U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2017-5024 Flood Inundation Mapping Data for Johnson Creek near Sycamore, Oregon. The domain of the HEC-RAS hydraulic model is a 12.9-mile reach of Johnson Creek from just upstream of SE 174th Avenue in Portland, Oregon, to its confluence with the Willamette River. Some of the hydraulics used in the model were taken from Federal Emergency Management Agency, 2010, Flood Insurance Study, City of Portland, Oregon, Multnomah, Clackamas, and Washington Counties, Volume 1 of 3, November 26, 2010. The Digital Elevation Model (DEM) utilized for the project was developed from lidar data flown in 2015 and provided by the Oregon Department...
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Future climates are simulated by general circulation models (GCM) using climate change scenarios (IPCC 2014). To project climate change for the sagebrush biome, we used 11 GCMs and two climate change scenarios from the IPCC Fifth Assessment, representative concentration pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5 (Moss et al. 2010, Van Vuuren et al. 2011). RCP4.5 scenario represents a future where climate policies limit and achieve stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations to 4.5 W m-2 by 2100. RCP8.5 scenario might be called a business-as-usual scenario, where high emissions of greenhouse gases continue in the absence of climate change policies. The two selected time frames allow comparison of near-term (2020-2050) and longer-term...
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Future climates are simulated by general circulation models (GCM) using climate change scenarios (IPCC 2014). To project climate change for the sagebrush biome, we used 11 GCMs and two climate change scenarios from the IPCC Fifth Assessment, representative concentration pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5 (Moss et al. 2010, Van Vuuren et al. 2011). RCP4.5 scenario represents a future where climate policies limit and achieve stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations to 4.5 W m-2 by 2100. RCP8.5 scenario might be called a business-as-usual scenario, where high emissions of greenhouse gases continue in the absence of climate change policies. The two selected time frames allow comparison of near-term (2020-2050) and longer-term...
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Future climates are simulated by general circulation models (GCM) using climate change scenarios (IPCC 2014). To project climate change for the sagebrush biome, we used 11 GCMs and two climate change scenarios from the IPCC Fifth Assessment, representative concentration pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5 (Moss et al. 2010, Van Vuuren et al. 2011). RCP4.5 scenario represents a future where climate policies limit and achieve stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations to 4.5 W m-2 by 2100. RCP8.5 scenario might be called a business-as-usual scenario, where high emissions of greenhouse gases continue in the absence of climate change policies. The two selected time frames allow comparison of near-term (2020-2050) and longer-term...
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Future climates are simulated by general circulation models (GCM) using climate change scenarios (IPCC 2014). To project climate change for the sagebrush biome, we used 11 GCMs and two climate change scenarios from the IPCC Fifth Assessment, representative concentration pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5 (Moss et al. 2010, Van Vuuren et al. 2011). RCP4.5 scenario represents a future where climate policies limit and achieve stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations to 4.5 W m-2 by 2100. RCP8.5 scenario might be called a business-as-usual scenario, where high emissions of greenhouse gases continue in the absence of climate change policies. The two selected time frames allow comparison of near-term (2020-2050) and longer-term...
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Future climates are simulated by general circulation models (GCM) using climate change scenarios (IPCC 2014). To project climate change for the sagebrush biome, we used 11 GCMs and two climate change scenarios from the IPCC Fifth Assessment, representative concentration pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5 (Moss et al. 2010, Van Vuuren et al. 2011). RCP4.5 scenario represents a future where climate policies limit and achieve stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations to 4.5 W m-2 by 2100. RCP8.5 scenario might be called a business-as-usual scenario, where high emissions of greenhouse gases continue in the absence of climate change policies. The two selected time frames allow comparison of near-term (2020-2050) and longer-term...
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Future climates are simulated by general circulation models (GCM) using climate change scenarios (IPCC 2014). To project climate change for the sagebrush biome, we used 11 GCMs and two climate change scenarios from the IPCC Fifth Assessment, representative concentration pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5 (Moss et al. 2010, Van Vuuren et al. 2011). RCP4.5 scenario represents a future where climate policies limit and achieve stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations to 4.5 W m-2 by 2100. RCP8.5 scenario might be called a business-as-usual scenario, where high emissions of greenhouse gases continue in the absence of climate change policies. The two selected time frames allow comparison of near-term (2020-2050) and longer-term...
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Future climates are simulated by general circulation models (GCM) using climate change scenarios (IPCC 2014). To project climate change for the sagebrush biome, we used 11 GCMs and two climate change scenarios from the IPCC Fifth Assessment, representative concentration pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5 (Moss et al. 2010, Van Vuuren et al. 2011). RCP4.5 scenario represents a future where climate policies limit and achieve stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations to 4.5 W m-2 by 2100. RCP8.5 scenario might be called a business-as-usual scenario, where high emissions of greenhouse gases continue in the absence of climate change policies. The two selected time frames allow comparison of near-term (2020-2050) and longer-term...
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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project, documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal change. Shoreline position is an easily understood...
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The Sandy Hook artificial reef, located on the sea floor offshore of Sandy Hook, New Jersey was built to create habitat for marine life. The reef was created by the placement of heavy materials on the sea floor; ninety-five percent of the material in the Sandy Hook reef is rock. In 2000, the U.S. Geological Survey surveyed the area using a Simrad EM1000 multibeam echosounder mounted on the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) ship Frederick G. Creed. The purpose of this multibeam survey, done in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers when the Creed was in the New York region in April 2000, was to map the bathymetry and backscatter intensity of the sea floor in the area of the Sandy Hook artificial reef. The collected...
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The Sandy Hook artificial reef, located on the sea floor offshore of Sandy Hook, New Jersey was built to create habitat for marine life. The reef was created by the placement of heavy materials on the sea floor; ninety-five percent of the material in the Sandy Hook reef is rock. In 2000, the U.S. Geological Survey surveyed the area using a Simrad EM1000 multibeam echosounder mounted on the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) ship Frederick G. Creed. The purpose of this multibeam survey, done in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers when the Creed was in the New York region in April 2000, was to map the bathymetry and backscatter intensity of the sea floor in the area of the Sandy Hook artificial reef. The collected...
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The data set consists of time, depth, reflection coefficient synthetic, sonic velocity, density, and amplitude used to create synthetic seismogram - City of Hollywood Utility, G-2961, (HOL-IW1), Broward County, Florida.
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Future climates are simulated by general circulation models (GCM) using climate change scenarios (IPCC 2014). To project climate change for the sagebrush biome, we used 11 GCMs and two climate change scenarios from the IPCC Fifth Assessment, representative concentration pathways (RCPs) 4.5 and 8.5 (Moss et al. 2010, Van Vuuren et al. 2011). RCP4.5 scenario represents a future where climate policies limit and achieve stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations to 4.5 W m-2 by 2100. RCP8.5 scenario might be called a business-as-usual scenario, where high emissions of greenhouse gases continue in the absence of climate change policies. The two selected time frames allow comparison of near-term (2020-2050) and longer-term...


map background search result map search result map Region 8 FMIS Wildfire and Fuel Treatment Locations 1980-2015 Fish Population and Hemlock data in Delware Water Gap Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for Louisiana Sandhill crane roosts use, channel characteristics, and environmental variables along the Platte River, Nebraska, 2003-2007 G-2961 (HOL-IW1) : Synthetic Seismogram Data for Correlation Between Seismic-Reflection Profiles and Well Data, Broward County, Florida Upper Colorado River Basin SPARROW model catchments and synthetic stream network - 2017 Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term End Point Rate Calculations for central North Carolina (NCcentral) Areas of uncertainty for flood inundation extents at gage 14211500, Johnson Creek near Sycamore, Oregon (sycor_breach.shp) GeoTIFF image of the backscatter intensity of the sea floor of the Sandy Hook artificial reef (2-m resolution, Mercator, WGS 84) Tracklines of a multibeam survey of the sea floor of the Sandy Hook artificial reef (polyline shapefile, geographic, WGS 84) Precipitation (Proportion July - Sep) - 2070-2100 - RCP8.5 - Mean Precipitation (Proportion July - Sep) - 2020-2050 - RCP8.5 - Min Temperature (Mean: Annual) - 2020-2050 - RCP8.5 - Min Precipitation (Proportion May - Oct) - 1980-2010 Precipitation (Proportion May - Oct) - 2070-2100 - RCP4.5 - Min Precipitation (Proportion May - Oct) - 2020-2050 - RCP4.5 - Min Precipitation (Mean: Apr - June) - 2070-2100 - RCP4.5 - Max Precipitation (Mean: Dec - Mar) - 2020-2050 - RCP4.5 - Min Nearshore bathymetry data from northern Monterey Bay, California, March 2016 Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term End Point Rate Calculations for central North Carolina (NCcentral) Tracklines of a multibeam survey of the sea floor of the Sandy Hook artificial reef (polyline shapefile, geographic, WGS 84) GeoTIFF image of the backscatter intensity of the sea floor of the Sandy Hook artificial reef (2-m resolution, Mercator, WGS 84) Areas of uncertainty for flood inundation extents at gage 14211500, Johnson Creek near Sycamore, Oregon (sycor_breach.shp) Nearshore bathymetry data from northern Monterey Bay, California, March 2016 Fish Population and Hemlock data in Delware Water Gap G-2961 (HOL-IW1) : Synthetic Seismogram Data for Correlation Between Seismic-Reflection Profiles and Well Data, Broward County, Florida Sandhill crane roosts use, channel characteristics, and environmental variables along the Platte River, Nebraska, 2003-2007 Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for Louisiana Upper Colorado River Basin SPARROW model catchments and synthetic stream network - 2017 Region 8 FMIS Wildfire and Fuel Treatment Locations 1980-2015 Precipitation (Proportion July - Sep) - 2070-2100 - RCP8.5 - Mean Precipitation (Proportion July - Sep) - 2020-2050 - RCP8.5 - Min Temperature (Mean: Annual) - 2020-2050 - RCP8.5 - Min Precipitation (Proportion May - Oct) - 1980-2010 Precipitation (Proportion May - Oct) - 2070-2100 - RCP4.5 - Min Precipitation (Proportion May - Oct) - 2020-2050 - RCP4.5 - Min Precipitation (Mean: Apr - June) - 2070-2100 - RCP4.5 - Max Precipitation (Mean: Dec - Mar) - 2020-2050 - RCP4.5 - Min