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A Vision for the Chihuahuan Desert The Chihuahuan Desert, shared by two nations, is one of the most biologically rich desert ecoregions in the world, alive with large mammals, birds, reptiles and an unmatched diversity of cactus species. The desert’s rivers, streams and springs are considered to be of global significance, home to fish species found nowhere else on earth. Our vision is a Chihuahuan Desert where governments, local communities, non-governmental organizations, academic institutions, landowners, and other stakeholders are working together to ensure that the richness and diversity of wildlife, habitats, natural communities, and ecological processes of the Chihuahuan Desert are conserved and, where necessary,...
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The National Forest Management Act (NFMA) of 1976 requires every national forest or grassland managed by the U.S. Forest Service to develop and maintain a Land and Resource Management Plan (often referred to as a forest plan). The forest plan is the principle long-range guidance document for each forest or grassland, providing direction for project and activity decision making. Forest plans articulate goals and objectives, the kinds of uses that are suitable for areas of a national forest, management standards and guidelines that apply to different kinds of activities, and the designation of special areas like Research Natural Areas. Forest plans are strategic in nature and do not compel any action or authorize...
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A battery of questions was developed and applied to different stakeholders immersed in knowledge of the condition and the use of grazing of grasslands. One hundred people were surveyed amongst livestock producers (both from private ranches and from communal ejidos), and students and researchers at regional institutions involved in agricultural sciences in different states of Mexico: Coahuila, Durango, San Luis Potosí, and Jalisco. The objective of the survey was to determine aspects of stakeholders’ interpretation of the condition of grasslands in their region under conditions of extensive grazing, such as soil condition, harvest efficiency, vegetation condition, openness to community organizing of grazing, capacity...
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The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of the north-central U.S. and south-central Canada contains millions of small prairie wetlands that provide critical habitat to many migrating and breeding waterbirds. Due to their small size and the relatively dry climate of the region, these wetlands are considered at high risk for negative climate change effects as temperatures increase. To estimate the potential impacts of climate change on breeding waterbirds, we predicted current and future distributions of species common in the PPR using species distribution models (SDMs). We created regional-scale SDMs for the U.S. PPR using Breeding Bird Survey occurrence records for 1971–2011 and wetland, upland, and climate variables....
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Full life-cycle vulnerability assessments are identifying the effects of climate change on nongame migratory birds that are of conservation concern and breed in the upper Midwest and Great Lakes region. Full life-cycle analyses are critical, as current efforts likely underestimate the vulnerability of migratory land birds due to a focus on assessing only one component of the annual cycle. The approach provides a framework for integrating exposure to climate changes, sensitivity to these changes, and the potential for adaptation in both winter and summer seasons, and accounts for carry-over effects from one season to another. The results of this work will inform regional management by highlighting both local and...
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Within the time frame of the longevity of tree species, climate change will change faster than the ability of natural tree migration. Migration lags may result in reduced productivity and reduced diversity in forests under current management and climate change. We evaluated the efficacy of planting climate-suitable tree species (CSP), those tree species with current or historic distributions immediately south of a focal landscape, to maintain or increase aboveground biomass, productivity, and species and functional diversity. We modeled forest change with the LANDIS-II forest simulation model for 100 years (2000–2100) at a 2-ha cell resolution and five-year time steps within two landscapes in the Great Lakes region...
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Phase 1 & 2 (2010, 2012): This project developed a sampling design and monitoring protocol for wintering shorebirds in the Central Valley and in the San Francisco Bay Estuary and develop an LCC-specific online shorebird monitoring portal publicly available at the California Avian Data Center. The three objectives in Phase II of this project are: 1) Complete the shorebird monitoring plan for the CA LCC by developing a sampling design and monitoring protocol for wintering shorebirds in coastal southern California and northern Mexico. 2) Develop models to evaluate the influence of habitat factors from multiple spatial scales on shorebird use of San Francisco Bay and managed wetlands in the Sacramento Valley, as a model...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2010, 2011, 2013, Academics & scientific researchers, Academics & scientific researchers, All tags...
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This project used species distribution modeling to assess the risk to habitat change under various climate change scenarios for rare plants. To predict the response of rare plant species to climate change, the project modeled the current distribution of the species using climate and environmental data (e.g., soils, disturbance, land-use), use these models to predict the species distribution given climate change, calculate current and future range size, calculate the amount of overlap of predicted future distribution with current distribution, and assess where barriers and protected areas are located with reference to the change in species distribution. Given the results of the distribution modeling, each species...
The National and Regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers (CASCs) work with natural and cultural resource managers to gather the scientific information and build the tools needed to help fish, wildlife and ecosystems adapt to the impacts of climate change. The Northwest Climate Adaptation Science Center (NW CASC) is one of eight regional CASCs, managed by the National CASC. The NW CASC is hosted by the University of Washington with Boise State University, University of Montana, Washington State University, and Western Washington University as consortium members. To learn more about the NW CASC, please visit: https://casc.usgs.gov/centers/northwest
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Project Synopsis: the Ferris Mountain project area consists of mainly timbered slopes, interspersed with upland areas dominated by sagebrush, grass, and mountain shrub communities. Timber stands within the project unit consist of Douglas fir, subalpine fir, spruce, lodgepole pine, limber pine, and aspen, in addition to scattered locations of Rocky Mountain juniper. Long-term suppression of wildfires has promoted the encroachment of conifers into shrublands, aspen stands, and drainages supporting aspen, waterbirch and willows, to the point where many of these communities are non-functional. Decadence and disease is commonly observed in terms of mistletoe, blister rust, and bleeding rust, and pine beetles have...
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One of the greatest challenges facing the Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD) in the 21st century will be our ability to maintain sustainable fish and wildlife populations and meet the expectations and desire of our citizens. We approach habitat conservation and management on a landscape/watershed scale based on the needs of all fish and wildlife and citizens who either enjoy and/or depend on wildlife, and the land and water resources of the State. This requires a great deal of teamwork and a broader view of our responsibilities. Addressing habitat needs and issues that seek to maintain open spaces, non-fragmented, quality habitats and the ability of fish and wildlife to utilize these areas provides an opportunity...
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This ecoregion is composed of a core area of high, precipitous mountains with narrow crests and valleys flanked in some areas by dissected plateaus and open high mountains. The elevational banding pattern of vegetation is similar to that of the Southern Rockies (21) except that areas of aspen, interior chaparral, and juniper-pinyon and scrub oak are more common at middle elevations. This characteristic, along with a far lesser extent of lodgepole pine and greater use of the region for grazing livestock in the summer months, distinguish the Wasatch and Uinta Mountains ecoregion from the more northerly Middle Rockies (17).
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This desert ecoregion extends from the Madrean Archipelago (79) in southeast Arizona to the Edwards Plateau (30) in south-central Texas. It is the northern portion of the southernmost desert in North America that extends more than 500 miles south into Mexico. It is generally a continuation of basin and range terrain that is typical of the Mojave Basin and Range (14) and Sonoran Basin and Range (81) ecoregions to the west, although the pattern of alternating mountains and valleys is not as pronounced. The mountain ranges are a geologic mix of Tertiary volcanic and intrusive granitic rocks, Paleozoic sedimentary layers, and some Precambrian granitic plutonic rocks. Outside the major river drainages, such as the Rio...
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Similar to the Northeastern Highlands (58), the Northeastern Coastal Zone contains relatively nutrient poor soils and concentrations of continental glacial lakes, some of which are sensitive to acidification; however, this ecoregion contains considerably less surface irregularity and much greater concentrations of human population. Landforms in the region include irregular plains, and plains with high hills. Appalachian oak forests and northeastern oak-pine forests are the natural vegetation types. Although attempts were made to farm much of the Northeastern Coastal Zone after the region was settled by Europeans, land use now mainly consists of forests, woodlands, and urban and suburban development, with only some...
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Stretching from Kentucky to Alabama, these open low mountains contain a mosaic of forest and woodland with some cropland and pasture. The eastern boundary of the ecoregion, along the more abrupt escarpment where it meets the Ridge and Valley (67), is relatively smooth and only slightly notched by small, eastward flowing streams. Much of the western boundary, next to the Interior Plateau (71), is more crenulated, with a rougher escarpment that is more deeply incised. The mixed mesophytic forest is restricted mostly to the deeper ravines and escarpment slopes, and the upland forests are dominated by mixed oaks with shortleaf pine. Ecoregion 68 has less agriculture than the adjacent Ecoregion 71. Coal mining occurs...
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This physically and biologically diverse ecoregion covers the highly dissected ridges, foothills, and valleys of the Klamath and Siskiyou mountains. It also extends south in California to include the mixed conifer and montane hardwood forests that occur
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The Northern Basin and Range consists of dissected lava plains, rocky uplands, valleys, alluvial fans, and scattered mountain ranges. Overall, it is cooler and has more available moisture than the Central Basin and Range (13) to the south. Ecoregion 80 is higher and cooler than the Snake River Plain (12) to the northeast in Idaho. Valleys support sagebrush steppe or saltbush vegetation. Cool season grasses, such as Idaho fescue and bluebunch wheatgrass are more common than in Ecoregion 13 to the south. Mollisols are also more common than in the hotter and drier basins of the Central Basin and Range (13) where Aridisols support sagebrush, shadscale, and greasewood. Juniper woodlands occur on rugged, stony uplands....
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This mostly forested region, with dense concentrations of continental glacial lakes, is less rugged than the Northeastern Highlands (58) to the west and considerably less populated than Ecoregion 59 to the south. Vegetation here is mostly spruce-fir on the lowlands with some patches of maple, beech, and birch on the hills. Soils are predominantly frigid Spodosols. By contrast, the forests in the Northeastern Coastal Zone (59) to the south are mostly Appalacian oak or northeastern oak-pine and the soils are generally mesic Inceptisols and Entisols.
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A GAP Analysis uses GIS layers provided by the GAP Analysis Program (species distribution models, stewardship data) to determine which areas within a species distribution have protected status and to identify possible conservation gaps. This GAP Analysis was conducted for Greater Sage-grouse within the boundary of the Southern Rockies LCC. About 7.6% of the Sage-grouse's total predicted distribution is within the SRLCC (based on GAP distribution models). There are four products in this ScienceBase item: an Excel spreadsheet with analysis data (see list below), a GIF image map of the SRLCC (displaying predicted sage-grouse distribution and areas with protected status), a map package containing the GIS layers used...


map background search result map search result map Northwest CASC GAP Analysis for the SRLCC: Greater Sage-grouse BLM Ferris Mountain Prescribed Burn Phase 1 Creating a detailed vegetation classification and digital vegetation map for Squaw Creek NWR Assessing and Mapping Rare Plant Species Vulnerability to Climate Change A Monitoring Protocol to Assess Wintering Shorebird Population Trends Strategic Habitat Plan Annual Report - 2007 Wasatch and Uinta Mountains Chihuahuan Deserts Northeastern Coastal Zone Southwestern Appalachians Klamath Mountains/California High North Coast Range Northern Basin and Range Acadian Plains and Hills Ecoregion-Based Conservation in the Chihuahuan Desert United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Southwestern Region Plan Revision Perceptions of the condition of semiarid grasslands under grazing regimes in Mexico/ Percepción de la condición del pastizal  bajo pastoreo, en México semiárido Publication: A blind spot in climate change Publication: Measuring and managing resistance and resilience under climate change in northern Great Lake forests Vulnerability of Breeding Waterbirds to Climate Change in the Prairie Pothole Region Creating a detailed vegetation classification and digital vegetation map for Squaw Creek NWR BLM Ferris Mountain Prescribed Burn Phase 1 Klamath Mountains/California High North Coast Range Acadian Plains and Hills Northeastern Coastal Zone Southwestern Appalachians Wasatch and Uinta Mountains A Monitoring Protocol to Assess Wintering Shorebird Population Trends Strategic Habitat Plan Annual Report - 2007 Northern Basin and Range Chihuahuan Deserts United States Department of Agriculture Forest Service Southwestern Region Plan Revision Assessing and Mapping Rare Plant Species Vulnerability to Climate Change Northwest CASC GAP Analysis for the SRLCC: Greater Sage-grouse Publication: Measuring and managing resistance and resilience under climate change in northern Great Lake forests Ecoregion-Based Conservation in the Chihuahuan Desert Perceptions of the condition of semiarid grasslands under grazing regimes in Mexico/ Percepción de la condición del pastizal  bajo pastoreo, en México semiárido Vulnerability of Breeding Waterbirds to Climate Change in the Prairie Pothole Region Publication: A blind spot in climate change