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This data set represents the results of calculations of hazard curves for a grid of points with a spacing of 0.05 degrees in latitude and longitude. It represents the chance of experiencing damaging earthquakes for fixed ground shaking levels that corresponds with MMI = VI. The values are obtained by averaging the probability of experiencing MMI = VI based on a peak ground acceleration value of 0.1155 g for site class D, and the probability of experiencing MMI = VI based on 1.0-second spectral acceleration value of 0.102 g for site class D. The data are for the Central and Eastern United States and are based on the one-year model.
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A seismic hazard model for South America, based on a smoothed (gridded) seismicity model, a subduction model, a crustal fault model, and a ground motion model, has been produced by the U.S. Geological Survey. These models are combined to account for ground shaking from earthquakes on known faults as well as earthquakes on un-modeled faults. This data set represents the results of calculations of hazard curves for a grid of points with a spacing of 0.1 degrees in latitude and longitude. This particular data set is for horizontal spectral response acceleration for 1.0-second period with a 10 percent probability of exceedance in 50 years.
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A seismic hazard model for South America, based on a smoothed (gridded) seismicity model, a subduction model, a crustal fault model, and a ground motion model, has been produced by the U.S. Geological Survey. These models are combined to account for ground shaking from earthquakes on known faults as well as earthquakes on un-modeled faults. This data set represents the results of calculations of hazard curves for a grid of points with a spacing of 0.1 degrees in latitude and longitude. This particular data set is for peak ground acceleration with a 10 percent probability of exceedance in 50 years.
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A seismic hazard model for South America, based on a smoothed (gridded) seismicity model, a subduction model, a crustal fault model, and a ground motion model, has been produced by the U.S. Geological Survey. These models are combined to account for ground shaking from earthquakes on known faults as well as earthquakes on un-modeled faults. This data set represents the results of calculations of hazard curves for a grid of points with a spacing of 0.1 degrees in latitude and longitude. This particular data set is for horizontal spectral response acceleration for 0.2-second period with a 50 percent probability of exceedance in 50 years.
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This data set represents the results of calculations of hazard curves for a grid of points with a spacing of 0.05 degrees in latitude and longitude. This particular data set is for horizontal spectral response acceleration for 1.0-second period with a 1 percent probability of exceedance in 1 year. The data are for the Central and Eastern United States and are based on the one-year model.
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A comparison of the 2017 USGS South America seismic hazard model and the Global Seismic Hazard Assessment Program (GSHAP) model was made to see how the models differ. The comparison was made as the ratio of PGA at 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years. The ratio map is included here as a geo-referenced tiff (GeoTIFF). The gridded data for the 2017 PGA at 10% probability can be found here, while the GSHAP data can be found here. Shedlock, K.M., Giardini, Domenico, Grünthal, Gottfried, and Zhang, Peizhan, 2000, The GSHAP Global Seismic Hazar Map, Sesimological Research Letters, 71, 679-686. https://doi.org/10.1785/gssrl.71.6.679
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A comparison of the 2017 USGS South America seismic hazard model and the 2010 USGS preliminary model was made to see how the models differ. The comparison was made as the ratio of PGA at 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years. The ratio map is included here as a geo-referenced tiff (GeoTIFF). The gridded data for the 2017 PGA at 10% probability can be found here, while the gridded data for the 2010 PGA at 10% probability can be found in the zip archive that can be downloaded using a link on this page.
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Maximum considered earthquake geometric mean peak ground acceleration maps (MCEG) are for assessment of the potential for liquefaction and soil strength loss, as well as for determination of lateral earth pressures in the design of basement and retaining walls. The maps are derived from the USGS seismic hazard maps in accordance with the site-specific ground-motion procedures of the NEHRP Recommended Seismic Provisions for New Building and Other Structures and the ASCE Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (also known as the ASCE 7 Standard; ASCE, 2016). The MCEG ground motions are taken as the lesser of probabilistic and deterministic values, as explained in the Provisions. The gridded probabilistic...
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A one-year seismic hazard forecast for the Central and Eastern United States, based on induced and natural earthquakes, has been produced by the U.S. Geological Survey. The model assumes that earthquake rates calculated from several different time windows will remain relatively stationary and can be used to forecast earthquake hazard and damage intensity for the year 2016. This assessment is the first step in developing an operational earthquake forecast for the CEUS, and the analysis could be revised with updated seismicity and model parameters. Consensus input models consider alternative earthquake catalog durations, smoothing parameters, maximum magnitudes, and ground motion estimates, and represent uncertainties...
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A seismic hazard model for South America, based on a smoothed (gridded) seismicity model, a subduction model, a crustal fault model, and a ground motion model, has been produced by the U.S. Geological Survey. These models are combined to account for ground shaking from earthquakes on known faults as well as earthquakes on un-modeled faults. This data set represents the results of calculations of hazard curves for a grid of points with a spacing of 0.1 degrees in latitude and longitude. This particular data set is for peak ground acceleration with a 2 percent probability of exceedance in 50 years.
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A seismic hazard model for South America, based on a smoothed (gridded) seismicity model, a subduction model, a crustal fault model, and a ground motion model, has been produced by the U.S. Geological Survey. These models are combined to account for ground shaking from earthquakes on known faults as well as earthquakes on un-modeled faults. This data set represents the results of calculations of hazard curves for a grid of points with a spacing of 0.1 degrees in latitude and longitude. This particular data set is for Modified Mercalli Intensity with a 50 percent probability of exceedance in 50 years. The maps and data were derived from PGA ground-motion conversions of Worden et al. (2012), and include soil amplification...
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A seismic hazard model for South America, based on a smoothed (gridded) seismicity model, a subduction model, a crustal fault model, and a ground motion model, has been produced by the U.S. Geological Survey. These models are combined to account for ground shaking from earthquakes on known faults as well as earthquakes on un-modeled faults. This data set represents the results of calculations of hazard curves for a grid of points with a spacing of 0.1 degrees in latitude and longitude. This particular data set is for horizontal spectral response acceleration for 0.2-second period with a 2 percent probability of exceedance in 50 years.
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A one-year seismic hazard forecast for the Central and Eastern United States, based on induced and natural earthquakes, has been produced by the U.S. Geological Survey. The model assumes that earthquake rates calculated from several different time windows will remain relatively stationary and can be used to forecast earthquake hazard and damage intensity for the year 2016. This assessment is the first step in developing an operational earthquake forecast for the CEUS, and the analysis could be revised with updated seismicity and model parameters. Consensus input models consider alternative earthquake catalog durations, smoothing parameters, maximum magnitudes, and ground motion estimates, and represent uncertainties...
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This data set represents the results of calculations of hazard curves for a grid of points with a spacing of 0.05 degrees in latitude and longitude. This particular data set is for horizontal spectral response acceleration for 0.2-second period with a 1 percent probability of exceedance in 1 year. The data are for the Central and Eastern United States and are based on the one-year model.
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These data sets are the results of calculations of hazard curves for a grid of points with a spacing of 0.05 degrees in latitude and longitude. They represent the chance of experiencing potentially damaging ground shaking for fixed ground shaking levels that corresponds with MMI = VI. The values are obtained by averaging the probability of experiencing MMI = VI based on a peak ground acceleration value of 0.1155 g for site class D, and the probability of experiencing MMI = VI based on 1.0-second spectral acceleration value of 0.102 g for site class D. The data are for the Western United States.
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Risk-targeted maximum considered earthquake ground acceleration maps (MCER) are for the design of buildings and other structures. The maps are derived from the USGS seismic hazard maps in accordance with the site-specific ground-motion procedures of the NEHRP Recommended Seismic Provisions for New Building and Other Structures and the ASCE Minimum Design Loads for Buildings and Other Structures (also known as the ASCE 7 Standard; ASCE, 2016). The MCER ground motions are taken as the lesser of probabilistic and deterministic values, as explained in the Provisions. The gridded probabilistic and deterministic values for 0.2-second spectral response acceleration are available here.
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A seismic hazard model for South America, based on a smoothed (gridded) seismicity model, a subduction model, a crustal fault model, and a ground motion model, has been produced by the U.S. Geological Survey. These models are combined to account for ground shaking from earthquakes on known faults as well as earthquakes on un-modeled faults. This data set represents the results of calculations of hazard curves for a grid of points with a spacing of 0.1 degrees in latitude and longitude. This particular data set is for horizontal spectral response acceleration for 1.0-second period with a 50 percent probability of exceedance in 50 years.
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This data set represents the results of calculations of hazard curves for a grid of points with a spacing of 0.05 degrees in latitude and longitude. This particular data set is for horizontal spectral response acceleration for 1.0-second period with a 1 percent probability of exceedance in 1 year. The data are for the Western United States and are based on the long-term 2014 National Seismic Hazard Model.
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This maps portrays the spatial potential for damaging earthquake ground shaking quantified as moderate (MMI ≥ VII) in 100 years. The maps and data are based on the average of the results obtained from peak ground acceleration and 1.0-second horizontal spectral acceleration. Site specific soil factors based on Vs30 shear wave velocities were implemented using a simple topographic proxy technique (Allen and Wald, 2009) and site amplification based on the relationships of Seyhan and Stewart (2014). MMI ≥ VII is equivalent to peak ground acceleration of 0.22g and 1.0-second horizontal spectral acceleration of 0.23g (Worden et al., 2012). Allen, T.A. and Wald, D.J. 2009,. On the use of high-resolution topographic...
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A one-year seismic hazard forecast for the Central and Eastern United States, based on induced and natural earthquakes, has been produced by the U.S. Geological Survey. The model assumes that earthquake rates calculated from several different time windows will remain relatively stationary and can be used to forecast earthquake hazard and damage intensity for the year 2016. This assessment is the first step in developing an operational earthquake forecast for the CEUS, and the analysis could be revised with updated seismicity and model parameters. Consensus input models consider alternative earthquake catalog durations, smoothing parameters, maximum magnitudes, and ground motion estimates, and represent uncertainties...


map background search result map search result map Chance of damage from an earthquake in 2016 based on peak ground acceleration for the Western United States Chance of damage from an earthquake in 2016 based on horizontal spectral response acceleration for 1.0-second period for the Western United States Chance of damage from an earthquake in 2016 based on the average of horizontal spectral response acceleration for 1.0-second period and peak ground acceleration for the Western United States Chance of damage from an earthquake in 2017 based on the average of horizontal spectral response acceleration for 1.0-second period and peak ground acceleration for the Central and Eastern United States 1.0-second spectral response acceleration (5% of critical damping) with a 1% probability of exceedance in 1 year for the Central and Eastern United States 1.0-second spectral response acceleration (5% of critical damping) with a 1% probability of exceedance in 1 year for the Western United States 0.2-second spectral response acceleration (5% of critical damping) with a 1% probability of exceedance in 1 year for the Central and Eastern United States Peak ground acceleration with a 2% probability of exceedance in 50 years Peak ground acceleration with a 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years 0.2-second spectral response acceleration (5% of critical damping) with a 2% probability of exceedance in 50 years 1.0-second spectral response acceleration (5% of critical damping) with a 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years Comparison with the 2010 USGS preliminary model Comparison with the 1999 Global Seismic Hazard Assessment (GSHAP) model 1.0-second spectral response acceleration (5% of critical damping) with a 50% probability of exceedance in 50 years 0.2-second spectral response acceleration (5% of critical damping) with a 50% probability of exceedance in 50 years Modified Mercalli Intensity, based on peak ground acceleration, with a 50% probability of exceedance in 50 years Chance of potentially minor-damage ground shaking in 2018 based on the average of horizontal spectral response acceleration for 1.0-second period and peak ground acceleration for the Western United States Chance of potentially minor-damage ground shaking in 2018 based on the average of horizontal spectral response acceleration for 1.0-second period and peak ground acceleration for the Western United States Chance of damage from an earthquake in 2016 based on peak ground acceleration for the Western United States Chance of damage from an earthquake in 2016 based on horizontal spectral response acceleration for 1.0-second period for the Western United States Chance of damage from an earthquake in 2016 based on the average of horizontal spectral response acceleration for 1.0-second period and peak ground acceleration for the Western United States 1.0-second spectral response acceleration (5% of critical damping) with a 1% probability of exceedance in 1 year for the Western United States 1.0-second spectral response acceleration (5% of critical damping) with a 1% probability of exceedance in 1 year for the Central and Eastern United States 0.2-second spectral response acceleration (5% of critical damping) with a 1% probability of exceedance in 1 year for the Central and Eastern United States Chance of damage from an earthquake in 2017 based on the average of horizontal spectral response acceleration for 1.0-second period and peak ground acceleration for the Central and Eastern United States Comparison with the 2010 USGS preliminary model Comparison with the 1999 Global Seismic Hazard Assessment (GSHAP) model 1.0-second spectral response acceleration (5% of critical damping) with a 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years 0.2-second spectral response acceleration (5% of critical damping) with a 2% probability of exceedance in 50 years 0.2-second spectral response acceleration (5% of critical damping) with a 50% probability of exceedance in 50 years 1.0-second spectral response acceleration (5% of critical damping) with a 50% probability of exceedance in 50 years Peak ground acceleration with a 2% probability of exceedance in 50 years Peak ground acceleration with a 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years Modified Mercalli Intensity, based on peak ground acceleration, with a 50% probability of exceedance in 50 years