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Abstract (from ESA Journals): Climate change is a well-documented driver and threat multiplier of infectious disease in wildlife populations. However, wildlife disease management and climate-change adaptation have largely operated in isolation. To improve conservation outcomes, we consider the role of climate adaptation in initiating or exacerbating the transmission and spread of wildlife disease and the deleterious effects thereof, as illustrated through several case studies. We offer insights into best practices for disease-smart adaptation, including a checklist of key factors for assessing disease risks early in the climate adaptation process. By assessing risk, incorporating uncertainty, planning for change,...
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Cold-water adapted Brook Trout were historically widely distributed – ranging from northern Quebec to Georgia, and from the Atlantic Ocean to Manitoba in the north, and along the Appalachian ridge in the south. However, studies show that due to factors associated with climate change, such as increased stream temperature and changing water flow, the number of streams containing Brook Trout is declining. Although efforts have been made to protect and restore this cold-water fish at local levels, the extent that temperature increases will vary within and across different streams and the ability of Brook Trout to seek cold-water refugia or adapt to these increasing stream temperatures currently remains unclear. The...
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Salt marshes of the Northeastern United States (Maine to Virginia) are vulnerable to loss given their history of intensive human alteration. One direct human modification – ditching – was common across the Northeast for salt hay farming since European Colonization and for mosquito control in the first half of the 20th century. We hand-digitized linear ditches across Northeastern intertidal emergent wetlands from contemporary aerial imagery within the bounds of the National Wetland Inventory's Estuarine Intertidal Emergent Wetland areas.


    map background search result map search result map Understanding Brook Trout Persistence in Warming Streams Linear Ditches of Northeastern U.S. Coastal Marshes from Maine to Virginia Derived from 2023 2D Aerial Imagery Basemap Understanding Brook Trout Persistence in Warming Streams Linear Ditches of Northeastern U.S. Coastal Marshes from Maine to Virginia Derived from 2023 2D Aerial Imagery Basemap