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Wetland ecosystems are vital for maintaining global biodiversity, as they provide important stopover sites for many species of migrating wetland-associated birds. However, because weather determines their hydrologic cycles, wetlands are highly vulnerable to effects of climate change. Although changes in temperature and precipitation resulting from climate change are expected to reduce inundation of wetlands, few efforts have been made to quantify how these changes will influence the availability of stopover sites for migratory wetland birds. Additionally, few studies have evaluated how climate change will influence interannual variability or the frequency of extremes in wetland availability. For spring and fall...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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The South Central Climate Adaptation Science Center (CASC) has several Communities of Practice (CoPs) focused on resource manager needs across the region (e.g. understanding at-risk species and ecosystems, building resilient coastal ecosystems, extreme weather and climate change, etc.). Each CoP has expertise in the subject matter and has been working on projects that are relevant to the resource community, including conducting literature reviews and small-scale pilot projects. The current research project will leverage the expertise of the existing CoPs to enhance the content available through the Conservation and Adaptation Resources Toolbox (CART) as identified through the partnership between the South Central...
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This dataset contains the input files, script, and output files regarding 110 years of daily regulated (observed) and naturalized streamflow (million cubic meters/day) for ten gauge stations in the Rio Grande/Bravo basin. The gauge stations included are at Amistad, Anzalduas, Artesia, Below Presidio, Laredo, Conchos Outlet, Foster Ranch, Laredo, Pecos Outlet, Salado River, and San Juan River.
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Data were used for a total of 97 climate projection scenarios in this study. These scenarios show monthly and annual streamflow in the Rio Grande main channel at the pair of USGS gauges at San Marcial, representing the inflows to Elephant Butte reservoir from 2022 to 2099. Townsend and Gutzler (2020) developed an adjustment procedure to convert natural flows projected by the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation at the Elephant Butte dam to realistic flow values at San Marcial (at the upstream end of Elephant Butte Reservoir) to account for upstream water management. The scenarios cover a range of dry (average annual projected flow less than the historical value) to wet (average annual projected flow higher than the historical...
Pollinator restoration presents many challenges, from selecting which species to plant to provide nectar during critical periods, to anticipating how these plant species will respond to changes in climate. A better understanding of flowering and seed timing for critical nectar plants, and the links between this activity and climate, can inform more resilient restoration plantings. We are a team of collaborators from the Bosque Ecosystem Monitoring Program, the Tribal Alliance for Pollinators, the Gulf Coast Phenology Trail, and the USA National Phenology Network, supported by a grant from the South Central Climate Adaptation Science Center. Our project, Time to Restore: Connecting People, Plants, and...
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Water management in the middle portion of the Rio Grande Basin (between Elephant Butte Reservoir in New Mexico and Presidio, Texas) is challenging because water demand has continued to increase over time despite limited river water and dropping groundwater levels. While urban and agricultural users can cope with frequent droughts by using a combination of river water and pumping groundwater, little to no water reaches living river ecosystems in this region. Improving this situation requires a good understanding of river water and groundwater availability, now and in the future, as well as advantages and disadvantages of water management options to sustain these ecosystems. In particular, there is a need to determine...
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USFWS Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) throughout the Mississippi River Basin (MRB) have identified high nutrient runoff, a major contributor to Gulf hypoxia, and declines in wildlife populations (especially grassland and riparian birds), as conservation challenges requiring collaborative action. This project aimed to develop a spatial decision support system (DSS) to address these issues. The DSS was designed to identify MRB watersheds where application of conservation practices can (1) reduce nutrient export to the Gulf hypoxia zone and (2) enhance conservation for grassland and riparian birds, based on (3) identifying landowners willing and capable of implementing these practices. The DSS is expected...
Categories: Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2014, Bird Conservation, Birds, Birds, Birds, All tags...
Abstract (from Wiley): Wetlands provide many ecosystem services and functions, including critical stopover habitat for numerous migratory bird species. Yet, loss and degradation of wetlands due to land use and land cover changes have greatly reduced wetland extent worldwide, leading to declines of many migratory shorebirds globally. In the Western Hemisphere, wetlands of the North American Great Plains provide important stopover habitat for shorebirds; however, much remains to be learned about shorebird habitat use during stopovers in this region, including species-specific associations with landscape-scale wetland availability and characteristics of individual wetlands. To improve understanding of shorebird habitat...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
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The main source of surface water for irrigation in the study area is the Rio Grande River. The upstream reservoirs, Elephant Butte and Caballo, are used to regulate river flow into the study area. In order to estimate the future surface water availability, we developed a model and routed the reservoir inflow projections at the USGS San Marcial through the reservoir system. The data are available in csv worksheet as open source for free public use.
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Groundwater resources are important for irrigated agricultural activities in the region. Farmers use groundwater to compensate for insufficient surface water availability. The data are stored in a csv file titled 'Monthly Groundwater Projections' (groundwater_availability_projections.csv). The columns represent monthly groundwater pumping rates (m3/day) while the rows represent months and dates. The data are open source and available for free public use.
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To support cultural resources and better understand the regional implications of climate change, the South Central Climate Adaptation Science Center (CASC) has found it critical to be directly engaged in research activities with the Federally recognized Tribes across the South Central United States. The South Central CASC Tribal Sustainability Science Manager will engage in scientific research that addresses Tribal needs for adaptive management and sustainability in the South-Central U.S. through an a extended network of connections to Tribal governments. This work is key to enhancing the Trust relationship of the Tribes with the Department of the Interior. This project will provide supplemental support for the...
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The Middle Rio Grande Hydroeconomic Optimization Model, also referenced as "The Bucket Model”, is a simple coarse-scale basin model that simulates all major water sources, sinks, uses, and losses. It also includes economic values of water, as well as institutional constraints governing water supply and use for the Middle Rio Grande between the inflow to Elephant Butte Reservoir and Fort Quitman on the Rio Grande. This model is designed to be a useful tool for improving our understanding of the hydrology, agronomy, institutions, and economics to guide analysis of policy and management questions that are important to stakeholders. The current version of the model is an aggregate “three bucket” model that reflects...
People who work on pollinator restoration need to make sure nectar is available to pollinators when they need it. They also must plan for shifts in the timing of flowering due to climate change. Time to Restore: Connecting People, Plants, and Pollinators aims to fill these needs. We seek to provide information about when plants will bloom and when seeds will be ready for harvest under future climate conditions. Over the past two years, we worked with representatives in the South Central region from federal agencies, tribes and Pueblos, conservation organizations, universities, native plant groups, and more. We asked them which nectar species are most important, what kind of information they need about flowering...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
Time to Restore is a SC Climate Adaptation Science Center-funded project aimed at better understanding how the plants that pollinators depend on are responding to climate change. Project results will ultimately help shape species selection for restoration. For more information see www.usanpn.org/TimetoRestore. The phenology calendars depict annual patterns of phenological activity, including intensity peak curves, displayed in a chart at the site or regional level.
Categories: Publication, Software; Types: Citation
Supporting Pollinator Restoration When restoring land to support pollinators, managers aim to select a mix of species that support pollinators throughout their periods of activity. This guide provides information on the timing of flowering and fruiting of nectar plants in Oklahoma and information on which species are most suitable for future climate conditions.
Eastern redcedar (Juniperus virginiana, redcedar) is a major woody species encroaching upon the native grasslands and forests of the southern Great Plains (SGP), representing a significant threat to regional ecosystem services. Future climate change is anticipated to influence redcedar habitat suitability, changing the probability of further encroachment and reshaping its spatial distribution. In this study, we trained seven Species Distribution Models (SDMs) with redcedar records from the USDA Forest Inventory Analysis database and used the ensemble of these SDMs to simulate redcedar distribution probability under current and future climate conditions in Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas. Results reveal a distinct east-to-west...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation


map background search result map search result map Science to Assess Future Conservation Practices for the Mississippi River Basin Understanding New Paradigms for “Environmental Flows” and Water Allocation in the Middle Rio Grande River Basin in a Changing Climate Natural and Observed flow at gauging stations from Presidio, Texas, to the outlet of the Rio Grande/Bravo from 1900 to 2011 Expanding the Conservation and Adaptation Resources Toolbox (CART) to the South Central United States Supporting Cultural Resources Affected by Climate Change in the South-Central United States Middle Rio Grande Hydroeconomic Optimization Model Monthly Groundwater Availability Projections for Middle Rio Grande River Basin for 2022-2099 Projected Reservoir Releases for the Middle Rio Grande for 2022 - 2099 Streamflow Projections in Rio Grande at San Marcial Gauges Derived from CMIP5 Global Climate Models Coupled to VIC Surface Hydrology Model from 1950 - 2099 Streamflow Projections in Rio Grande at San Marcial Gauges Derived from CMIP5 Global Climate Models Coupled to VIC Surface Hydrology Model from 1950 - 2099 Projected Reservoir Releases for the Middle Rio Grande for 2022 - 2099 Middle Rio Grande Hydroeconomic Optimization Model Understanding New Paradigms for “Environmental Flows” and Water Allocation in the Middle Rio Grande River Basin in a Changing Climate Monthly Groundwater Availability Projections for Middle Rio Grande River Basin for 2022-2099 Natural and Observed flow at gauging stations from Presidio, Texas, to the outlet of the Rio Grande/Bravo from 1900 to 2011 Expanding the Conservation and Adaptation Resources Toolbox (CART) to the South Central United States Supporting Cultural Resources Affected by Climate Change in the South-Central United States Science to Assess Future Conservation Practices for the Mississippi River Basin