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This is a collaborative project to support enhanced camas prairie monitoring and synthesis of existing camas lily monitoring data in the Weippe Prairie Unit of Nez Perce National Historical Park (NEPE) and in Big Hole National Battlefield (BIHO), within the Upper Columbia Basin Network (UCBN). The NPS will work with Oregon State University (OSU) to: (1) Synthesize camas monitoring data from NEPE and BIHO dating back to 2005 with weather and soil moisture and water table data to describe how variation in climate and weather influences soil moisture and camas density and flowering rates; (2) augment the existing camas monitoring protocol with new standard operating procedures for establishing and surveying permanent...
The objective of this project is to integrate observations from multiple image acquisition platforms into a coherent time series of glacier volume changes for a variety of sites in the Pacific Northwest, including South Cascade Glacier and the others in Washington State (e.g., Mt. Olympus, Mt. Rainier, Mt. Baker). Specific objectives include: Enhancing glacier mass balance methodology by incorporating newly derived and reanalyzed geodetic records in the form of Digital Elevation Models and associated Area Altitude Distributions. Estimating regional patterns of glacier mass balance by expanding the spatial density of mass balance measurements and the geographic diversity of monitored glaciers. Understanding hydrologic...
Climate change is expected to result in changes in plant-pollinator interactions, but the severity of these changes is not yet clearly understood. This project will address both spatial and temporal effects of climate change on plant-pollinator interactions by studying butterfly and plant phenology in alpine and subalpine environments of Mount Rainier National Park (MORA). Western Washington University and the National Park Service will collaborate on several project objectives, including conducting field work at multiple meadows at MORA to collect plant and butterfly data, constructing plant phenophase profiles for common forbs, constructing butterfly emergence curves for commonly detected species, developing a...
Elevated anthropogenic nitrogen (N) emissions are causing higher rates of atmospheric N deposition (Ndep) that may saturate Cascade ecosystems with reactive N. Simultaneously, increasing global temperatures and altered circulation patterns generated by climate change are expected to strongly impact snow regimes in the Cascade Range, causing reduced snowpack, earlier snowmelt dates, and higher proportions of rain precipitation. Concern over the impacts of Ndep to sensitive, high-elevation ecosystems has prompted calls for research into its interaction with climate change and the effects of Ndep on ecosystem services. This is a collaborative project between the National Park Service and Washington State University...
The Coastal Engineering Inventory project aims to inventory, catalog and map coastal engineering projects in and adjacent to coastal units of the National Park Service (NPS). The goal is to develop a greater understanding of the extent of coastal engineering modification along our coast and provide information to allow resource managers to make better decisions about how to preserve NPS resources and allow for visitor use and recreation. This project will build upon an existing pilot study and GIS database that was completed for ten coastal parks. This collaborative project will expand the coastal engineering inventory to include an evaluation of coastal engineering impacts on NPS resources by developing a prioritized...
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The threat of droughts and their associated impacts on the landscape and human communities has long been recognized in the United States, especially in high risk areas such as the South Central region. There is ample literature on the effects of long-term climate change and short-term climate variability on the occurrence of droughts. However, it is unclear whether this information meets the needs of relevant stakeholders and actually contributes to reducing the vulnerability or increasing the resilience of communities to droughts. For example, are the methods used to characterize the severity of drought – known as drought indices – effective tools for predicting the actual damage felt by communities? As droughts...
Abstract (from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00028487.2016.1150879): Long-term sampling of fisheries data is an important source of information for making inferences about the temporal dynamics of populations that support ecologically and economically important fisheries. For example, time series of catch-per-effort data are often examined for the presence of long-term trends. However, it is also of interest to know whether certain sampled locations are exhibiting temporal patterns that deviate from the overall pattern exhibited across all sampled locations. Patterns at these “unusual” sites may be the result of site-specific abiotic (e.g., habitat) or biotic (e.g., the presence of an invasive species)...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Fish, Fish, Northeast CASC
Abstract (from http://www.esajournals.org/doi/abs/10.1890/11-2296.1): Physiological tolerance of environmental conditions can influence species-level responses to climate change. Here, we used species-specific thermal tolerances to predict the community responses of ant species to experimental forest-floor warming at the northern and southern boundaries of temperate hardwood forests in eastern North America. We then compared the predictive ability of thermal tolerance vs. correlative species distribution models (SDMs) which are popular forecasting tools for modeling the effects of climate change. Thermal tolerances predicted the responses of 19 ant species to experimental climate warming at the southern site,...
A new method for automatic detection of atmospheric rivers (ARs) is developed and applied to an atmospheric reanalysis, yielding an extensive catalog of ARs land-falling along the west coast of North America during 1948–2017. This catalog provides a large array of variables that can be used to examine AR cases and their climate-scale variability in exceptional detail. The new record of AR activity, as presented, validated and examined here, provides a perspective on the seasonal cycle and the interannual-interdecadal variability of AR activity affecting the hydroclimate of western North America. Importantly, AR intensity does not exactly follow the climatological pattern of AR frequency. Strong links to hydroclimate...
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This data set contains links that are important to each species' habitat network. Those important links are scored based on the percent currently under protection status, projected change in climate suitability by the middle of the 21st century, and projected change in percent urbanized by the middle of the 21st century. Important links were identified from all links in the networks of each species based on their Integral Index of Connectivity (dIIC). Any links with dIIC scores > 0.9 or which connected to nodes with dIIC > 0.9 were retained here as "important" links.
Abstract (from http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0173844): Urban habitats are characterized by impervious surfaces, which increase temperatures and reduce water availability to plants. The effects of these conditions on herbivorous insects are not well understood, but may provide insight into future conditions. Three primary hypotheses have been proposed to explain why multiple herbivorous arthropods are more abundant and damaging in cities, and support has been found for each. First, less complex vegetation may reduce biological control of pests. Second, plant stress can increase plant quality for pests. And third, urban warming can directly increase pest fitness and abundance. These...
Abstract (from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/gdj3.47/abstract): Two datasets of soil temperature observations collected at Norman, Oklahoma, USA, were analysed to study horizontal and vertical variability in their observations. The first dataset comprised 15-min resolution soil temperature observations from 20 September 2011 to 18 November 2013 in seven plots across a 10-m transect. In each plot, sensors were located at depths of 5, 10, and 30 cm. All seven plots observed fairly consistent maximum soil temperature observations during the spring, fall, and winter months. Starting in late May, the observed spread in soil temperatures across the 10-m transect increased significantly until August when the...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: South Central CASC


map background search result map search result map Community Resilience to Drought Hazard: An Analysis of Drought Exposure, Impacts, and Adaptation in the South Central U.S. Important links for Black bear, Rafinesque's big-eared bat, and timber rattlesnake Community Resilience to Drought Hazard: An Analysis of Drought Exposure, Impacts, and Adaptation in the South Central U.S. Important links for Black bear, Rafinesque's big-eared bat, and timber rattlesnake