Skip to main content
USGS - science for a changing world
Advanced Search

Filters: Tags: Arctic (X) > Categories: Publication (X)

360 results (85ms)   

View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
thumbnail
Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) of the southern Beaufort Sea population, distributed from approximately Icy Cape, west of Point Barrow, to Pearce Point, east of Paulatuk in Canada, are harvested by hunters from both countries. In Canada, quotas to control polar bear hunting have been in place, with periodic modifications, since 1968. In Alaska, passage of the United State Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA) of 1972 banned polar bear hunting unless done by Alaska Natives for subsistence. However, the MMPA placed no restrictions on numbers or composition of the subsistence hunt, leaving open the potential for an overharvest with no possible legal management response until the population was declared depleted. Recognizing...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Arctic
thumbnail
Using satellite telemetry, we monitored the movements of an adult female polar bear (Ursus maritimus) as she traveled from the Alaskan Beaufort Sea coast to northern Greenland. She is the first polar bear known to depart the Beaufort Sea region for an extended period, and the first polar bear known to move between Alaska and Greenland. This bear traveled for four months across the polar basin and came within 2 degrees of the North Pole. During the first year following her capture, she traveled 5256 km. Evidence to suggest her use of maternity dens in northern Alaska and in northern Greenland demonstrates the potential for genetic exchange between two widely separate populations of polar bears. The long life spans...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Arctic
thumbnail
Tundra vegetation in the Teshekpuk Lake area of the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain was mapped to assess distribution and abundance of waterfowl habitats. Three SPOT satellite scenes were acquired and registered to a 20 m Universal Transverse Mercator grid. Two clustering techniques were used to develop statistical parameters by which the SPOT data were spectrally classified. A maximum likelihood algorithm that correlated spectral classes with land cover types was applied to the SPOT data. Field data were used to assist in spectral class labeling and vegetation descriptions. Twelve cover classes were mapped. The most common type was moist sedge meadow tundra (13.5%); the least common was moss/peat shoreline (0.2%)....
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: Arctic


map background search result map search result map The polar bear management agreement for the southern Beaufort Sea: an evaluation of the first ten years of a unique conservation agreement The polar bear management agreement for the southern Beaufort Sea: an evaluation of the first ten years of a unique conservation agreement