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With extraordinary resolution and accuracy, Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR)-derived digital elevation models (DEMs) have been increasingly used for watershed analyses and modeling by hydrologists, planners and engineers. Such high-accuracy DEMs have demonstrated their effectiveness in delineating watershed and drainage patterns at fine scales in low-relief terrains. However, these high-resolution datasets are usually only available as topographic DEMs rather than hydrologic DEMs, presenting greater land roughness that can affect natural flow accumulation. Specifically, locations of drainage structures such as road culverts and bridges were simulated as barriers to the passage of drainage. This paper proposed...
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Separate data for floodplain elevation and bathymetry were collected on the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Upper Mississippi River Restoration (UMRR) program. While many information needs can be met by using these data separately, in many cases seamless elevation data across the river and its floodplain are needed. This seamless elevation surface was generated by merging lidar (i.e., floodplain elevation) and bathymetry data. Merging the data required special processing in the areas of transition between the two sources of data.
Removal of nonnative riparian trees is accelerating to conserve water and improve habitat for native species. Widespread control of dominant species, however, can lead to unintended erosion. Helicopter herbicide application in 2003 along a 12-km reach of the Rio Puerco, New Mexico, eliminated the target invasive species saltcedar (Tamarix spp.), which dominated the floodplain, as well as the native species sandbar willow (Salix exigua Nuttall), which occurred as a fringe along the channel. Herbicide application initiated a natural experiment testing the importance of riparian vegetation for bank stability along this data-rich river. A flood three years later eroded about 680,000 m(3) of sediment, increasing mean...
Removal of nonnative riparian trees is accelerating to conserve water and improve habitat for native species. Widespread control of dominant species, however, can lead to unintended erosion. Helicopter herbicide application in 2003 along a 12-km reach of the Rio Puerco, New Mexico, eliminated the target invasive species saltcedar (Tamarix spp.), which dominated the floodplain, as well as the native species sandbar willow (Salix exigua Nuttall), which occurred as a fringe along the channel. Herbicide application initiated a natural experiment testing the importance of riparian vegetation for bank stability along this data-rich river. A flood three years later eroded about 680,000 m(3) of sediment, increasing mean...
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Separate data for floodplain elevation and bathymetry were collected on the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Upper Mississippi River Restoration (UMRR) program. While many information needs can be met by using these data separately, in many cases seamless elevation data across the river and its floodplain are needed. This seamless elevation surface was generated by merging lidar (i.e., floodplain elevation) and bathymetry data. Merging the data required special processing in the areas of transition between the two sources of data.
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Separate data for floodplain elevation and bathymetry were collected on the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Upper Mississippi River Restoration (UMRR) program. While many information needs can be met by using these data separately, in many cases seamless elevation data across the river and its floodplain are needed. This seamless elevation surface was generated by merging lidar (i.e., floodplain elevation) and bathymetry data. Merging the data required special processing in the areas of transition between the two sources of data.
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Separate data for floodplain elevation and bathymetry were collected on the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Upper Mississippi River Restoration (UMRR) program. While many information needs can be met by using these data separately, in many cases seamless elevation data across the river and its floodplain are needed. This seamless elevation surface was generated by merging lidar (i.e., floodplain elevation) and bathymetry data. Merging the data required special processing in the areas of transition between the two sources of data.
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Separate data for floodplain elevation and bathymetry were collected on the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Upper Mississippi River Restoration (UMRR) program. While many information needs can be met by using these data separately, in many cases seamless elevation data across the river and its floodplain are needed. This seamless elevation surface was generated by merging lidar (i.e., floodplain elevation) and bathymetry data. Merging the data required special processing in the areas of transition between the two sources of data.
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Separate data for floodplain elevation and bathymetry were collected on the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Upper Mississippi River Restoration (UMRR) program. While many information needs can be met by using these data separately, in many cases seamless elevation data across the river and its floodplain are needed. This seamless elevation surface was generated by merging lidar (i.e., floodplain elevation) and bathymetry data. Merging the data required special processing in the areas of transition between the two sources of data.
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Separate data for floodplain elevation and bathymetry were collected on the Upper Mississippi River System (UMRS) by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Upper Mississippi River Restoration (UMRR) program. While many information needs can be met by using these data separately, in many cases seamless elevation data across the river and its floodplain are needed. This seamless elevation surface was generated by merging lidar (i.e., floodplain elevation) and bathymetry data. Merging the data required special processing in the areas of transition between the two sources of data.


map background search result map search result map UMRR Pool 04 Topobathy UMRR Pool 05 Topobathy UMRR Pool 07 Topobathy UMRR Pool 08 Topobathy UMRR Pool 09 Topobathy UMRR Pool 21 Topobathy UMRR Pool 05a Topobathy Drainage Structure Datasets and Effects on LiDAR-Derived Surface Flow Modeling UMRR Pool 05a Topobathy UMRR Pool 05 Topobathy UMRR Pool 21 Topobathy UMRR Pool 07 Topobathy UMRR Pool 08 Topobathy UMRR Pool 09 Topobathy UMRR Pool 04 Topobathy Drainage Structure Datasets and Effects on LiDAR-Derived Surface Flow Modeling