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On August 25, 2015 speaker Matt Germino presented on his work restoring sagebrush in the Great Basin. Shrubs are ecosystem foundation species in most of the Great Basin’s landscapes. Most of the species, including sagebrush, are poorly adapted to the changes in fire and invasive pressures that are compounded by climate change. This presentation gives an overview of challenges and opportunities regarding restoration of sagebrush and blackbrush, focusing on climate adaptation, selection of seeds and achieving seeding and planting success. Results from Great Basin LCC supported research on seed selection and planting techniques are presented.
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FY2013The increase in large wildfires at a time when habitat for Greater Sage Grouse and other species dependent on big sagebrush has also increased has led to substantial needs for big sagebrush seeds. Significant decisions on which sagebrush seed to use and on management treatments that affect competing herb layers on the same restoration sites affect the trajectory of habitat.This project will evaluate how seed source, specifically genotype and climate-of-origin, interact with landscape-scale and replicated treatments (fencing, herbicide application, mowing, and seeding).
In 2013, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Conservation Objectives Team (COT) identified wildfire and the associated conversion of low- to mid-elevation sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) habitats to invasive annual grass-dominated vegetation communities as the two primary threats to the sustainability of Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus, hereafter GRSG) in the western portion of the species range (USFWS 2013). To facilitate the examination and evaluation of the role fire and invasive plants play in the conservation of GRSG, the USFWS solicited the assistance of the Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (WAFWA) to conduct a collaborative assessment of the conservation challenges...
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FY2017Removal of livestock grazing is a common prescription to promote ecosystem recovery after wildfire (and subsequent emergency site rehabilitation efforts). Ecosystem recovery is typically considered from a terrestrial perspective, but wildfire and grazing can strongly influence aquatic ecosystems as well, especially smaller and fragmented stream networks, which are prevalent in the Great Basin (Minshall et al. 1989[1]; Dunham et al. 2003[2]; Luce et al. 2012[3]). Understanding these influences is essential for managing fire and grazing. Examples include identifying timeframes for resuming livestock grazing following wildfire, and the interactions between livestock grazing, fuels, and recovery of stream-side...
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FY2011Increasingly large wildfires in the Great Basin and Columbia Plateau have led to large dust storms in areas historically without them. Large dust storms have adversely affected human health, energy production operations, soil fertility, and mountain snowpack hydrology. USGS research efforts have investigated the causes and consequences of post-fire dust storms. Publications from this work are being used by managers with the Bureau of Land Management, Department of Energy, and other land managers to develop management practices that will minimize dust production.
The Great Basin Landscape Conservation Cooperative draws on its Steering Committee and Science and Traditional Ecological Knowledge (S-TEK) partners to prioritize and support conservation science across the Great Basin region. Over nine years, GBLCC has distributed $3.3 million in direct funds and leveraged an additional $5.2 million in matching and in-kind contributions to 50 projects including sagebrush modelling under climate scenarios, tribal adaptations to climate change, mapping of wetlands across the region and many more.
Wind erosion and aeolian transport processes are under studied compared to rainfall-induced erosion and sediment transport on burned landscapes. Post-fire wind erosion studies have predominantly focused on near-surface sediment transport and associated impacts such as on-site soil loss and site fertility. Downwind impacts, including air quality degradation and deposition of dust or contaminants, are also likely post-fire effects; however, quantitative field measurements of post-fire dust emissions are needed for assessment of these downwind risks. A wind erosion monitoring system was installed immediately following a desert sagebrush and grass wildfire in southeastern Idaho, USA to measure wind erosion from the burned...
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Emerging applications of ecosystem resilience and resistance concepts in sagebrush ecosystems allow managers to better predict and mitigate impacts of wildfire and invasive annual grasses. Soil temperature and moisture strongly influence the kind and amount of vegetation, and consequently, are closely tied to sagebrush ecosystem resilience and resistance (Chambers et al. 2014). Soil taxonomic temperature and moisture regimes can be used as indicators of resilience and resistance at landscape scales to depict environmental gradients in sagebrush ecosystems that range from cold/cool-moist sites to warm-dry sites. We aggregated soil survey spatial and tabular data to facilitate broad-scale analyses of resilience and...
Categories: Data, Publication; Types: Citation, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: Oregon, California, Colorado, EARTH SCIENCE > LAND SURFACE > LANDSCAPE, Greater sage-grouse, All tags...
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FY2011Aspen populations are in decline across western North America due to altered fire regimes, herbivory, drought, pathogens, and competition with conifers. Aspen stands typically support higher avian biodiversity than surrounding habitats, and maintaining current distributions of several avian species is likely tied to persistence of aspen on the landscape. We are examining effects of climate change on aspen and associated avian communities in isolated mountain ranges of the northern Great Basin, by coupling empirical models of avian-habitat relationships with spatially-explicit landscape simulations of vegetation and disturbance dynamics (using LANDIS-II) under various climate change scenarios. We are addressing...


    map background search result map search result map Effects of Genotype and Management Treatments of Native and Invasive Herbs on Success of Sagebrush Restoration Journal Article: Soil Temperature and Moisture Regimes across Sage-Grouse Range Wildfire, grazing and availability of water in sage steppe ecosystems Quantifying vulnerability of quaking aspen woodlands and associate bird communities to global climate change in the northern Great Basin Dust Erosion Following Wildfires and Drought Wildfire, grazing and availability of water in sage steppe ecosystems Quantifying vulnerability of quaking aspen woodlands and associate bird communities to global climate change in the northern Great Basin Effects of Genotype and Management Treatments of Native and Invasive Herbs on Success of Sagebrush Restoration Dust Erosion Following Wildfires and Drought Journal Article: Soil Temperature and Moisture Regimes across Sage-Grouse Range