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Folders: ROOT > ScienceBase Catalog > National and Regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers > Midwest CASC > FY 2023 Projects ( Show all descendants )

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As part of the State Wildlife Grant Fund, states are required to submit State Wildlife Plans (SWAPs) every 10 years detailing threats to habitats and species and conservation plans. However, incorporating climate change in SWAPs is voluntary, and capacity/expertise limitations at state agencies have resulted in varied and often only partial consideration of climate change impacts. In response, the MW CASC will conduct literature reviews to assess climate stressors and impacts to habitats and key species and to identify relevant adaptation actions for 13 different Level 2/3 EPA Ecoregions contained within the MW CASC area states. This work will provide a foundation for future habitat vulnerability assessments. ...
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Cold-water fish species such as trout and salmon are highly valued components of many stream ecosystems in Michigan and the Great Lakes region and are sensitive to rising stream temperatures. For example, the timing of spawning and development rates of these species are affected by stream temperature from late fall through spring. Historically, stream temperature modeling has focused on air temperature and solar radiation as the main drivers of stream temperature, while streams that are fed by groundwater are often viewed as being less affected by climate warming. However, as the climate continues to warm, groundwater temperatures could also rise, thereby contributing to warming stream temperatures and reducing...
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The Midwest United States is facing wetter winters and springs and more variable precipitation in the summer and fall. Heavy floods and prolonged droughts are costly to agriculture, housing, transportation infrastructure, and recreational opportunities across the region. These extremes also stress the health of freshwater ecosystems that are important to the regional economy and quality of life. The number of freshwater invertebrates like mussels, crayfish, and aquatic insects are generally declining which strongly indicates declining freshwater health. Losing these animals limits benefits such as water purification, food for wildlife, and aesthetic values. This project seeks to understand and synthesize information...
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The Midwest region faces unique challenges from climate change that affect forests, grasslands, lakes, rivers, wetlands, and the services and cultural values these ecosystems provide. These changes also occur in a wide range of land types and cultural settings, such as on and off Tribal reservation and treaty-ceded land, within and around towns and cities, and in farms and managed forests. The goal of adaptation science is to identify, test, and demonstrate management strategies that reduce the impacts of climate change. This project will advance the creation and distribution of adaptation science that addresses the natural resource needs of the Midwest through: 1) a synthesis project and research symposium that...
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Inland fisheries have tremendous cultural, economic, and subsistence value. However, climate change brings new stresses to land-locked fisheries that raise novel challenges for resource managers. One fundamental challenge in inland fisheries is how to best assess and manage data-limited fisheries when resources are finite and uncertainty is pervasive. To address this challenge, we will use quantitative models to examine whether indicators of fish population status commonly-measured by managers can serve as a “short-cut” to more data- and capacity-intensive approaches. Further, we will work and communicate directly with state and Tribal fisheries managers to better understand the challenges they face when making...
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The prairie grasslands of the Midwest and Great Plains provide important habitat for a wide variety of plants and animals, clean drinking water, and space for outdoor recreation and have experienced an over 99% loss of prairie grasslands due to a variety of factors including climate change. Land managers that are working to restore prairie grasslands would like to make them resilient to a shifting climate. However, they have limited information about how to plan these restorations with climate adaptation in mind In the Midwest and throughout much of North America, the effects of climate change are more pronounced and rapid in winter than in other seasons. Winters generally have less snow leaving plants more exposed...
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Water levels in the Great Lakes are fluctuating in ways that we have not seen in the past, with both historically low- and high-water levels occurring in the last decade. Expectations are that larger and more frequent water-level fluctuations will occur in response to climate change. The increased variability in lake levels has implications for the management of invasive plants found in the coastal wetlands that surround the Great Lakes, with some species benefiting from periods of low water levels. Phragmites australis, a prominent invasive grass that disrupts fish and wildlife habitats, thrived during the most recent period of low lake levels. However, periods of high lake levels could provide managers with opportunities...


    map background search result map search result map Climate Adaptation for Data-Limited Inland Fisheries State Wildlife Action Planning in the Midwest How Management Decisions Might Improve the Resilience of Prairies Under Winter Climate Change Synthesizing the Responses and Vulnerabilities of Freshwater Invertebrates to Droughts and Heavy Precipitation in the Midwest Groundwater and Stream Temperature Modeling to Assess the Effect of Warming Temperatures on Coldwater Fish A Decision-Support Tool for Invasive Plant Management Under Fluctuating Great Lakes Water Levels Assessing and Advancing Different Ways of Knowing in Climate Adaptation in the Midwest How Management Decisions Might Improve the Resilience of Prairies Under Winter Climate Change Groundwater and Stream Temperature Modeling to Assess the Effect of Warming Temperatures on Coldwater Fish Climate Adaptation for Data-Limited Inland Fisheries A Decision-Support Tool for Invasive Plant Management Under Fluctuating Great Lakes Water Levels State Wildlife Action Planning in the Midwest Synthesizing the Responses and Vulnerabilities of Freshwater Invertebrates to Droughts and Heavy Precipitation in the Midwest Assessing and Advancing Different Ways of Knowing in Climate Adaptation in the Midwest