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Rate of global biodiversity loss increased significantly during the 20th century associated with human environmental alterations. Specifically, mismanagement of freshwater resources contributed to historical and contemporary loss of stream-dwelling fish diversity and will likely play a role in determining the persistence of species in the future. We present a mechanistic pathway by which human alteration of streams has caused the decline of a unique reproductive guild of Great Plains stream-dwelling fishes, and suggest how future climate change might exacerbate these declines. Stream fragmentation related to impoundments, diversion dams and stream dewatering are consequences of increasing demand for freshwater resources...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2010, AR-04, CATFISHES/MINNOWS, CO-03, CT-04, All tags...
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We propose to use long-term fish-population data from a relict reach of the Pecos River, New Mexico to assess population dynamics of imperiled prairie-river minnows, including Arkansas River shiner. Development of viable management strategies requires basic understanding of population ecology. Rigorous, quantitative ecological methods can be used to analyze continuous, long-term demographic data, but such data are rarely available for imperiled, non-game fishes. Data available for the Pecos River provide a unique opportunity to apply quantitative methods to prairie-river minnow conservation and management. Analyses proposed here would determine (1) whether population regulation is density dependent or flow-regime...
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The Tongass National Forest has identified resources that are important to stakeholders and vulnerable to climate-related stressors. Cooperators will review an action plan and convene a workshop to be held in Southeast Alaska in 2016. The workshop will foster collaboration between scientists, managers, and stakeholders. Workshop goals include: sharing information about climate-related stressors and effects on NPLCC Priority Resources in the Tongass National Forest; developing strategic priorities for improving understanding, reducing risks, and increasing adaptive capacity and resilience; coordinating support for increasing knowledge and informing resource managers
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2015, AK-0, AK-00, Alaska, Alaska, All tags...
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Projected water deficits mean that land and water managers must be proactive in their management of rivers and shallow aquifers, if they want to maintain the ecosystems dependent upon them. To do this, managers and decision makers need easy access to the best techniques available for determining how much water ecosystems need. This project will result in a Desert LCC-wide database of environmental flow needs and responses (environmental water demands) to help water and land managers make management decisions. This project will identify critical data gaps in flow need and flow response data in the Desert LCC (especially related to baseflow dependent streams) and result in a user-friendly, one-stop-shop for managers...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2014, AZ-01, AZ-02, AZ-03, AZ-04, All tags...
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Rainwater Harvesting and Stormwater Research is a priority research area identified by the Arizona Governor’s Blue Ribbon Panel on Water Sustainability, which recommended that universities take the lead to identify regulatory barriers, cost and benefits, water quality issues and avenues for increasing utilization of stormwater and rainwater at the regional, community and individual property level. In an effort to address the priority research area, the University of Arizona will develop a decision support tool to be used by public utilities and agencies to evaluate suitability and cost-effectiveness of rainwater and stormwater capture at various scales for multiple benefits. Data from the City of Tucson, Arizona...
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There is a need to understand how alteration of physical processes on the Rio Grande River have impacted aquatic biota and their habitats, and a need to predict potential future effects of climate change on biotic resources in order to prescribe research and management activities that will enhance conservation of aquatic species. We propose a project with the goal of developing monitoring recommendations and identifying research needs for aquatic ecological resources in the Big Bend region of the Rio Grande. This goal will be targeted by synthesizing and analyzing available data and literature for aquatic species in the project region. In particular, we will work to develop time series of abundance and population...
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Understanding the physiological impacts of climate change on arid lands species is a critical step towards ensuring the resilience and persistence of such species under changing temperature and moisture regimes. Varying degrees of vulnerability among different species will largely determine their future distributions in the face of climate change. Studies have indicated that Northern Mexico and the Southwestern United States are likely to become climate change hotspots, experiencing significantly drier and warmer average conditions by the end of the 21st century. However, relatively few studies have examined specifically the physiological effects of climate change on species inhabiting this region. This manuscript...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2014, AZ-01, AZ-02, AZ-03, AZ-04, All tags...
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Habitat loss and fragmentation are widely recognized as among the most important threats to global biodiversity. New analytical approaches are providing improved ability to predict the effects of landscape change on population connectivity at vast spatial extents. This paper presents an analysis of population connectivity for three species of conservation concern [swift fox (Vulpes velox); lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus); massasuaga (Sistrurus catenatus)] across the American Great Plains region. We used factorial least-cost path and resistant kernel analyses to predict effects of landscape conditions on corridor network connectivity. Our predictions of population connectivity provide testable...
Categories: Data, Project, Publication; Types: Citation, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2010, CO-01, CO-02, CO-03, CO-04, All tags...
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Comprehensive geospatial data covering the area of the Gulf Coast Prairie Landscape Conservation Cooperative is needed to better inform and improve countless conservation efforts and help partners convey a shared vision and priorities for this area in geospatial terms.
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2013, 2016, 2017, Academics & scientific researchers, Applications and Tools, All tags...
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The mottled duck, a focal species for the Gulf Coast Prairie Landscape Conservation Cooperative, is one of only a few duck species adapted to breeding in southern marshes. A major part of its population spends its entire life cycle within a relatively small coastal area in eastern Texas and western Louisiana. This is a thriving part of the Mississippi and Central Flyways, two of four major waterfowl migration routes in North America. In recent years, the mottled duck’s habitat and surrounding areas have been compromised by urbanization, agricultural development, and changes to the area’s hydrology affecting coastal wetlands. The latter threat includes the ramifications of climate change, such as sea level rise and...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2012, 2013, ANIMALS/VERTEBRATES, ANIMALS/VERTEBRATES, ANIMALS/VERTEBRATES, All tags...
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Of the vital rates that determine recruitment, breeding propensity (i.e., the proportion of females that lay at least one egg) and nest success appear to have the greatest influence, but breeding propensity remains poorly studied. The few studies that have been conducted reveal it to be highly variable among years (15–77%), likely in response to environmental conditions (e.g., precipitation and wetland availability), and lower than estimates from other dabbling ducks. Thus, quantifying breeding propensity across the mottled duck range in the WGC and identifying factors responsible for its variation remain high priorities for future investigation. Breeding propensity is also among the most difficult vital rates to...
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A combination of citizen science inventories and expert assessments will be used to collect critical baseline information on known spring and seep resources using the Spring Ecosystem Inventory and Assessment Protocols and adapting them as needed for the unique arid Sky Island ecosystems. The assessment will collect information on channel morphology, riparian and wetland vegetation, water quality, aquatic macroinvertebrates, and wildlife. This information will be combined with historic data from cooperating agencies (Pima County, Santa Cruz County, USFS, NPA, USGS, USFWS, BLM, and AGFD) in a regional, on-line database to provide a landscape level context for managing resources, which was previously unavailable due...
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The Humboldt Bay-Eel River region may experience the highest rate of relative sea level rise increase along the West Coast. The Project will engage stakeholders to discuss community and science needs for planning and implementing adaptation measures to sea level rise. The Project is a critical step in developing an ecosystem based-management (EBM) approach to guide the protection, management, enhancement, adaptation, restoration, and possible redistribution of Humboldt Bay-Eel River Delta habitats under future climate scenarios. This process will be informed by the best-available science, the needs of Humboldt Bay-Eel River Delta agricultural producers, and other community members.
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2015, Academics & scientific researchers, Academics & scientific researchers, CA-02, CA-2, All tags...
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Construct enclosures at Columbia Mine to house approximately 60 turtles (translocated animals) that were collected off of the right-of-way for sections 2 and 4 of I-69. Monitor the behavior, survival and reproduction of trans-located box turtles during the captive phase of the new home-range adoption process. Determine the population and habit-use characteristics of the remnant, resident box turtle population at Columbia Mine. Determine the genetics profile of individual trans-located, resident and hatchling turtles and to conduct parentage analysis of hatchlings or eggs detected. Monitor the survival, movements and habitat use of post-release, trans-located turtles for 2 years post-release.
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In June 2015, the Eastern Tallgrass Prairie and Big Rivers Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) of the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) granted $80,000 to the City of St. Louis (City) to promote urban monarch conservation by expanding activities associated with Milkweeds for Monarchs: The St. Louis Butterfly Project (M4M). Generally speaking, the USFWS grant was to: (1) enhance urban education and outreach efforts, and (2) conduct research on urban monarch habitat. The project spent $51,583.57 on activities for ed and $27,785.68 for research. The City’s Office of the Mayor used a portion of the funds to contract a part time individual to act as a Monarch Community Liaison, and used the majority of the grant...
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An Iowa State University research team in collaboration with Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge and other partners has discovered that strategically adding a little bit of prairie back onto the agricultural landscape can result in many benefits – for water and soil quality, habitat for wildlife and pollinators, as well as opportunities for biomass production. With assistance from ETPBR member USDA Farm Service Agency, research has shown how small amounts of native prairie vegetation integrated within corn and soybean row crops produce environmental benefits at levels disproportionately greater than their extent and in a cost effective manner. The project has now transitioned to demonstration and evaluation of the...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2013, 2014, Academics & scientific researchers, Applications and Tools, Conservation Design, All tags...
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Habitat fragmentation is considered to be a leading cause that is responsible for the long-term population declines of Northern Bobwhites. There are numerous factors responsible for habitat fragmentation such as expanding suburbanization, intensification of agricultural and forestry practices, and invasions of exotic plants; the unifying theme is how people use land for settlement and the production of food and fiber. As patches of habitat become smaller and more isolated, populations experience a lower probability of persistence that results in local extinctions, which can lead to larger, and perhaps even regional extinctions. However, we lack a strong empirical and quantified basis that describes the numerical...
Categories: Data, Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2015, 2016, Academics & scientific researchers, Conservation Design, Conservation NGOs, All tags...
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Texas Tech University will conduct quantitative and predictive analysis of the connectivity of isolated desert “wetlands”, that include tinajas, the name for eroded pools in bedrock, for 20 wildlife species over the Sonoran desert ecoregion. Potential loss of wetlands due to climate change will also be studied to identify high value areas that can be prioritized for future restoration efforts and targeted for better management practices.Target species for landscape connectivity analysis include:Colorado River toad ( Incilius alverius )American bullfrog ( Lithobates catesbeianus )Chiricahua leopard frog ( Lithobates chiricahuensis )Lowland leopard frog ( Lithobates yavapaiensis )Couch’s spadefoot ( Scaphiopus couchii...


map background search result map search result map Consequences of stream fragmentation and climate change for rare Great Plains fishes Climate change and connectivity: Assessing landscape and species vulnerability Relocation of Eastern Box Turtles to reclaimed mineland at the Patoka River NWR Creating a detailed vegetation classification and digital vegetation map for Squaw Creek NWR Population Management of Prairie-River Minnows Utility Guide to Rainwater/Stormwater Harvesting as an Adaptive Response to Climate Change Landscape Connectivity of Isolated Waters for Wildlife in the Sonoran Desert Spatially-Explicit Decision Support Tool for Guiding Habitat Conservation for Western Gulf Coast Mottled Ducks “Common Ground” Landcover Classification: Oklahoma Ecological Systems Mapping Ecological changes in aquatic communities in the Big Bend reach of the Rio Grande: Synthesis and future monitoring needs Physiological Effects of Climate Change on Species within the Desert LCC Desert LCC Environmental Flows Database Prairie STRIPS Conservation Planning Atlas for the Gulf Coast Prairie Landscape Conservation Cooperative Impacts of Habitat Fragmentation on Northern Bobwhites in the Gulf Coast Prairie Landscape Conservation Cooperative Climate Change in the Tongass National Forest  Fostering Strategic Collaboration and Informing Sustainable Management of Priority Resources Developing Shared Strategies for Sea-level Rise Adaptation in Working Lands of Humboldt Bay and the Eel River Delta Milkweeds for Monarchs St Louis Urban Prairie Education, Outreach and Research Project Using light-level geolocators to measure breeding propensity of mottled ducks in the Western Gulf Coast Springs and Seeps Inventory, Assessment, and Management Planning Project Creating a detailed vegetation classification and digital vegetation map for Squaw Creek NWR Developing Shared Strategies for Sea-level Rise Adaptation in Working Lands of Humboldt Bay and the Eel River Delta Milkweeds for Monarchs St Louis Urban Prairie Education, Outreach and Research Project Ecological changes in aquatic communities in the Big Bend reach of the Rio Grande: Synthesis and future monitoring needs Springs and Seeps Inventory, Assessment, and Management Planning Project Prairie STRIPS Population Management of Prairie-River Minnows Landscape Connectivity of Isolated Waters for Wildlife in the Sonoran Desert “Common Ground” Landcover Classification: Oklahoma Ecological Systems Mapping Climate Change in the Tongass National Forest  Fostering Strategic Collaboration and Informing Sustainable Management of Priority Resources Spatially-Explicit Decision Support Tool for Guiding Habitat Conservation for Western Gulf Coast Mottled Ducks Using light-level geolocators to measure breeding propensity of mottled ducks in the Western Gulf Coast Consequences of stream fragmentation and climate change for rare Great Plains fishes Climate change and connectivity: Assessing landscape and species vulnerability Utility Guide to Rainwater/Stormwater Harvesting as an Adaptive Response to Climate Change Impacts of Habitat Fragmentation on Northern Bobwhites in the Gulf Coast Prairie Landscape Conservation Cooperative Conservation Planning Atlas for the Gulf Coast Prairie Landscape Conservation Cooperative Desert LCC Environmental Flows Database Physiological Effects of Climate Change on Species within the Desert LCC