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This dataset describes irrigation water use in Kansas in 2015. Volumes of water used, irrigated area, and average irrigation application depths are provided for three sets of subareas: (1) Irrigation water use analysis regions that include Groundwater Management Districts (GMDs) with the areas outside of GMDs divided into eastern, central, and western Kansas; (2) Regional Planning Areas (RPAs), which are 14 areas determined by the Kansas Water Office based on hydrologic and administrative boundaries, each with a set of goals outlined in the Kansas Water Vision (https://kwo.ks.gov/water-plan/water-vision); and (3) the 105 Kansas counties. Volumes of water used, irrigated area, and average application depths are also...
Well-established conservation planning principles and techniques framed by geodesign were used to assess the restorability of areas that historically supported coastal wetlands along the U.S. shore of Saginaw Bay. The resulting analysis supported planning efforts to identify, prioritize, and track wetland restoration opportunity and investment in the region. To accomplish this, publicly available data, criteria derived from the regional managers and local stakeholders, and geospatial analysis were used to form an ecological model for spatial prioritization. These data include parameter inputs from external sources current to 2016. For an updated data set, including parameter inputs up to 2023, please see: Hopkins,...
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This dataset is the output of a python script/ArcGIS model that identifes dikes as having a difference in elevation above a certain threshold. If the elevation difference was below a certain threshold the area was not considered a dike; however, if the difference in elevation between two points was significantly high then the area was marked as a dike. Areas continuous with eachother were considered part of the same dike. Post processing occured. Users examined the data output, comparing the proposed dike locations to aerial imagery, flowline data, and the DEM. Dikes that appeared to be false positives were deleted from the data set. These data include parameter inputs from external sources current to 2016. For...
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This dataset is the output of a python script/ArcGIS model that identifes dikes as having a difference in elevation above a certain threshold. If the elevation difference was below a certain threshold the area was not considered a dike; however, if the difference in elevation between two points was significantly high then the area was marked as a dike. Areas continuous with eachother were considered part of the same dike. Post processing occured. Users examined the data output, comparing the proposed dike locations to aerial imagery, flowline data, and the DEM. Dikes that appeared to be false positives were deleted from the data set. These data include parameter inputs from external sources current to 2016. For...
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Optimal hydrograph separation (OHS) is a two-component, hydrograph separation method that uses a two-parameter, recursive digital filter (RDF) constrained via chemical mass balance to estimate the base flow contribution to a stream or river (Rimmer and Hartman, 2014; Raffensperger et al., 2017). A recursive digital filter distinguishes between high-frequency and low-frequency discharge data within a hydrograph, where high-frequency data corresponds to quick flow or storms and low-frequency data corresponds to base flow. The two parameters within the RDF are alpha and beta, both are unitless. Alpha is defined as the recession constant and typically found through recession analysis. For the purposes of this data release...
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This represents the flowline network in Western Lale Erie Restoration Assessment (WLERA). It is attributed with the number of disconnections between the reach and the connecting river system. These data will help identify the condition of hydrologic separation between potential restoration areas and the connecting river system. Low numbers represent fewer disconnections such as culverts between the reach and the rivers requiring no flow network modification to restore the area. These data include parameter inputs from external sources current to 2016. For an updated data set, including parameter inputs up to 2023, please see: Jaenicke, M.E., Hopkins, A.L., Kowalski, K.P., Bozimowski, A.A., and Sanocki, C.A., 2024,...
Categories: Data; Types: Citation, Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Artificial Path, Canal / Ditch, FWHydrography, Great Lakes, Hydrography, All tags...
Well-established conservation planning principles and techniques framed by geodesign were used to assess the restorability of areas that historically supported coastal wetlands along the U.S. shore of the connecting rivers (Detroit River and St. Clair River). The resulting analysis supported planning efforts to identify, prioritize, and track wetland restoration opportunity and investment in the region. To accomplish this, publicly available data, criteria derived from the regional managers and local stakeholders, and geospatial analysis were used to form an ecological model for spatial prioritization. These data include parameter inputs from external sources current to 2016. For an updated data set, including...
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This represents the flowline network in Connecting River Systems Restoration Assessment (CRSRA). It is attributed with the number of disconnections between the reach and the connecting river system. These data will help identify the condition of hydrologic separation between potential restoration areas and the connecting river system. Low numbers represent fewer disconnections such as culverts between the reach and the rivers requiring no flow network modification to restore the area. These data include parameter inputs from external sources current to 2016. For an updated data set, including parameter inputs up to 2023, please see: Hopkins, A.L., Jaenicke, M.E., Bozimowski, A.A., Kowalski, K.P., and Sanocki,...
Categories: Data; Types: Citation, Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Artificial Path, Canal / Ditch, Detroit River, FWHydrography, Great Lakes, All tags...
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This represents the flowline network in Sagina Bay Restoration Assessment (SBRA). It is attributed with the number of disconnections between the reach and the connecting river system. These data will help identify the condition of hydrologic separation between potential restoration areas and the connecting river system. Low numbers represent fewer disconnections such as culverts between the reach and the rivers requiring no flow network modification to restore the area. These data include parameter inputs from external sources current to 2016. For an updated data set, including parameter inputs up to 2023, please see: Jaenicke, M.E., Hopkins, A.L., Kowalski, K.P., Bozimowski, A.A., and Sanocki, C.A., 2024, Saginaw...
Categories: Data; Types: Citation, Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Artificial Path, Canal / Ditch, FWHydrography, Great Lakes, Hydrography, All tags...
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This dataset is the output of a python script/ArcGIS model that identifes dikes as having a difference in elevation above a certain threshold. If the elevation difference was below a certain threshold the area was not considered a dike; however, if the difference in elevation between two points was significantly high then the area was marked as a dike. Areas continuous with eachother were considered part of the same dike. Post processing occured. Users examined the data output, comparing the proposed dike locations to aerial imagery, flowline data, and the DEM. Dikes that appeared to be false positives were deleted from the data set. These data include parameter inputs from external sources current to 2016. For...
Well-established conservation planning principles and techniques framed by geodesign were used to assess the restorability of areas that historically supported coastal wetlands along the U.S. shore of western Lake Erie. The resulting analysis supported planning efforts to identify, prioritize, and track wetland restoration opportunity and investment in the region. To accomplish this, publicly available data, criteria derived from the regional managers and local stakeholders, and geospatial analysis were used to form an ecological model for spatial prioritization (Western Lake Erie Restoration Assessmente (WLERA)). Within the 192,618 ha study area that was bounded by the mouths of the Detroit River, MI to the north...


    map background search result map search result map Saginaw Bay Restoration Assessment Degree Flowlines (2016) Saginaw Bay Restoration Assessment Dikes (2016) Connecting River Systems Restoration Assessment Degree Flowlines (2016) Connecting River Systems Restoration Assessment Dikes (2016) Western Lake Erie Restoration Assessment Degree Flowlines (2016) Western Lake Erie Restoration Assessment Dikes (2016) Irrigation water use in Kansas, 2015 Base flow estimation via optimal hydrograph separation at CONUS watersheds and comparison to the National Hydrologic Model - Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System by HRU calibrated version Connecting River Systems Restoration Assessment Dikes (2016) Connecting River Systems Restoration Assessment Degree Flowlines (2016) Western Lake Erie Restoration Assessment Dikes (2016) Western Lake Erie Restoration Assessment Degree Flowlines (2016) Saginaw Bay Restoration Assessment Dikes (2016) Saginaw Bay Restoration Assessment Degree Flowlines (2016) Irrigation water use in Kansas, 2015 Base flow estimation via optimal hydrograph separation at CONUS watersheds and comparison to the National Hydrologic Model - Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System by HRU calibrated version