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The Arizona Bureau of Mines (and later the Arizona Bureau of Geology and Mineral Technology and the Arizona Geological Survey) maintained a significant collection of primary data on mining districts, deposits, and prospects across Arizona. Some of this data has previously been utilized to contribute to earlier efforts by the U.S. Geological Survey to develop the Computerized Resources Information Bank (CRIB) as a centralized repository of organizing and summarizing data on mineral resources in the 1970’s. However, the primary data sources have previously only been available in person at the Arizona Geological Survey offices. Following the transfer of the Arizona Geological Survey to the University of Arizona in...
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Album caption: Pulling small canoe through riffles. Upper Yukon, Alaska. General collection album caption: Arduous labor of pulling loaded canoes up rapids. Dall River ascent. Companion photo to number 182. No index card available.
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Album caption: View of right wall showing shale formation where geologic section was taken about one and one-half miles above Lava Canyon. 8-14-23. E.C.L. Handwritten notes on album caption: G.C.N. Park, Coconino County, Arizona. Index card: View of right wall showing shale formation where geologic section was taken about one and one-half miles above Lava Canyon. Grand Canyon National Park. Coconino County, Arizona. August 14, 1923.
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Album caption: Downstream view of the Granite Gorge of the Grand Canyon from point on left bank at mouth of Mineral Canyon. Picture taken during electrical storm. The white talus on the right wall is an asbestos mine. 8-18-23. E.C.L. Handwritten notes on album caption: Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. Index card: Downstream view of the Granite Gorge of the Grand Canyon from point on left bank at mouth of Mineral Canyon. Picture taken during electrical storm. The white talus on the right wall is an asbestos mine. Grand Canyon National Park. Coconino County, Arizona. August 18, 1923.
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Album caption: Upstream view of the Granite Gorge in the Grand Canyon from left wall at mouth of Mineral Canyon. 8-18-23. E.C.L. Handwritten notes on album caption: Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. Index card: Upstream view of the Granite Gorge in the Grand Canyon from left wall at mouth of Mineral Canyon. Grand Canyon National Park. Coconino County, Arizona. August 18, 1923.
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Water scarcity is a growing concern in Texas, where surface water is derived almost entirely from rainfall. Changes in air temperature and precipitation patterns associated with global climate change are anticipated to regionally affect the quality and quantity of inland surface waters and consequently their suitability as habitat for freshwater life. In addition to directly affecting resident organisms and populations, these changes in physicochemical traits of aquatic habitats may favor the establishment of harmful invasive species. As conflicts over the use of water resources grow in intensity, this information will become important for fish and wildlife managers to anticipate impacts of climate change on trust...
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One of the biggest challenges facing resource managers today is not knowing exactly when, where, or how climate change effects will unfold. To help federal land managers address this need, the North Central CASC has been working with the National Park Service to pioneer an approach for incorporating climate science and scenario planning into NPS planning processes, in particular Resource Stewardship Strategies (RSS). These strategies serve as a long-range planning tool for a national park unit to achieve its desired natural and cultural resource conditions, and are used to guide a park’s full spectrum of resource-specific management plans and day-to-day management activities. To support adaptation planning within...
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Federal land managers need an adaptive management framework to accommodate changing conditions and that allows them to effectively link the appropriate science to natural resource management decision-making across jurisdictional boundaries. FRAME-SIMPPLLE is a collaborative modeling process designed to accomplish this goal by coupling the adaptive capabilities of the SIMPPLLE modeling system with accepted principles of collaboration. The two essential components of the process are FRAME (Framing Research in support of the Adaptive Management of Ecosystems), which creates a collaborative problem-solving environment, and SIMPPLLE (SIMulating Patterns and Processes at Landscape Scales), which is a vegetation dynamics...
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The USGS National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center (NCCWSC), as part of the work of the Interagency Land Management Adaptation Group (ILMAG), initiated a project in 2013 to develop plans for a searchable, public registry on climate change vulnerability assessments. Member agencies from the USGCRP Adaptation Science Work Group, the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies (AFWA), and several NGO’s also contributed. Vulnerability assessments are important for identifying resources that are most likely to be affected by climate change and providing insights on why certain resources are vulnerable. Consequently, they provide valuable information for informing climate change adaptation planning. CRAVe allows...
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National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs) along the East Coast of the United States protect habitat for a host of wildlife species, while also offering storm surge protection, improving water quality, supporting nurseries for commercially important fish and shellfish, and providing recreation opportunities for coastal communities. Yet in the last century, coastal ecosystems in the eastern U.S. have been severely altered by human development activities as well as sea-level rise and more frequent extreme events related to climate change. These influences threaten the ability of NWRs to protect our nation’s natural resources and to sustain their many beneficial services. Through this project, researchers are collaborating with...
Categories: Project; Types: Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2015, Adaptive management, CASC, Completed, Completed, All tags...
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Determining which species, habitats, or ecosystems are most vulnerable to climate change enables resource managers to better set priorities for conservation action. To address the need for information on vulnerability, this research project aimed to leverage the expertise of university partners to inform the North Central Climate Science Center on how to best assess the vulnerability of elements of biodiversity to climate and land use change in order to inform the development and implementation of management options. Outcomes from this activity were expected to include 1) a framework for modeling vegetation type and species response to climate and land use change, 2) an evaluation of existing alternative vegetation...
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The South Central U.S. is one of the main agricultural regions in North America: annual agricultural production is valued at more than $44 billion dollars. However, as climate conditions change, the region is experiencing more frequent and severe droughts, with significant impacts on agriculture and broader consequences for land management. For example, in 2011 drought caused an estimated $7.6 billion in agricultural losses in Texas and an additional $1.6 billion in Oklahoma. Although there are many drought monitoring tools available, most of these tools were developed without input from the stakeholders, such as farmers and ranchers, who are intended to use them. The goal of this project was to assess the information...
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Covering 120 million acres across 14 western states and 3 Canadian provinces, sagebrush provides critical habitat for species such as pronghorn, mule deer, and sage-grouse – a species of conservation concern. The future of these and other species is closely tied to the future of sagebrush. Yet this important ecosystem has already been affected by fire, invasive species, land use conversion, and now, climate change. In the western U.S., temperatures are rising and precipitation patterns are changing. However, there is currently a limited ability to anticipate the impacts of climate change on sagebrush. Current methods suffer from a range of weakness that limits the reliability of results. In fact, the current uncertainty...
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The Jago, Okpilak, and Hulahula rivers in the Arctic are heavily glaciated waterways that are important for fish and wildlife as well as human activities including the provision of food, recreation, and, potentially, resource extraction on the coastal plain. If current glacial melting trends continue, most of the ice in these rivers will disappear in the next 50-100 years. Because of their importance to human and natural communities, it is critical to understand how these rivers and their surrounding environments will be affected by climate change and glacier loss. The overarching goal of this project was to research (1) the amount of river water, sediment, nutrients, and organic matter in the Jago, Okpilak, and...
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Northeastern boreal forests are an important habitat type for many wildlife species, including migratory birds and moose. These animals play vital roles in the boreal forest ecosystem, are a source of pleasure for bird and wildlife watchers, and contribute to tourism revenue for many communities. However, moose and migratory birds are thought to be particularly vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. For example, in New York’s Adirondack Park system, five species of boreal birds have shown occupancy declines of 15% or more. Meanwhile, moose are threatened by winter ticks that thrive in warmer climates and spread disease. A 2018 New York Department of Environmental Conservation (NYDEC) report found that there...
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The threat of droughts and their associated impacts on the landscape and human communities has long been recognized in the United States, especially in high risk areas such as the South Central region. There is ample literature on the effects of long-term climate change and short-term climate variability on the occurrence of droughts. However, it is unclear whether this information meets the needs of relevant stakeholders and actually contributes to reducing the vulnerability or increasing the resilience of communities to droughts. For example, are the methods used to characterize the severity of drought – known as drought indices – effective tools for predicting the actual damage felt by communities? As droughts...
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Pollinator restoration requires information about what species to plant and when to plant them to ensure food sources are available throughout the periods when pollinators are active. Changes in climate, including earlier spring warming and warmer fall temperatures, may cause flowering to become out of sync with pollinator activity. When restoring land to support pollinators, managers are challenged to select a mix of species that support pollinators of concern throughout their periods of activity. Existing planting tools have several disadvantages such as, their usability is location specific, they are virtually non-existent for the South Central region, and they do not often account for future changes in plant...
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The Northwest Climate Conference (formerly called the Pacific Northwest Climate Science Conference) is the premier climate science event for the region, providing a forum for researchers and practitioners to share scientific results and discuss challenges and solutions related to the impacts of climate change on people, natural resources, and infrastructure in the Northwest. Conference participants include policy- and decision-makers, resource managers, and scientists from academia, public agencies, sovereign tribal nations, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector. More information can be found at the conference website: http://pnwclimateconference.org. The Seventh Annual Northwest Climate Conference...
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The South Central U.S. encompasses a wide range of ecosystem types and precipitation patterns. Average annual precipitation is less than 10 inches in northwest New Mexico but can exceed 60 inches further east in Louisiana. Much of the region relies on warm-season convective precipitation – that is, highly localized brief but intense periods of rainfall that are common in the summer. This type of precipitation is a significant driver of climate and ecosystem function in the region, but it is also notoriously difficult to predict since it occurs at such small spatial and temporal scales. While global climate models are helpful for understanding and predicting large-scale precipitation trends, they often do not capture...
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Hawaiʻi is considered a worldwide biodiversity hotspot, with nearly 90 percent of its native plants found nowhere else in the world. However, about half of these native plants are imperiled by threats including human development, non-native species, and climate change. Through this project, scientists modeled the relative vulnerability of over 1,000 native plant species to the effects of climate change. A panel of experts in Hawaiian plant species assisted with the development of the model and verified its results. From the model, researchers were able to develop a vulnerability score for each plant species and identify categories of species with high, medium, and low vulnerability to climate change. This information...


map background search result map search result map Modeling and Projecting the Influence of Climate Change on Texas Surface Waters and their Aquatic Biotic Communities Using a Collaborative Modeling Approach to Explore Climate and Landscape Change in the Northern Rockies and Inform Adaptive Management The Impacts of Glacier Change on the Jago, Okpilak, and Hulahula Rivers in the Arctic Assessing the Vulnerability of Vegetation to Future Climate in the North Central U.S. Pulling small canoe through riffles. Yukon region, Alaska. circa 1901. Establishing Climate Change Vulnerability Rankings for Hawaiian Native Plants Improving Representation of Extreme Precipitation Events in Regional Climate Models Community Resilience to Drought Hazard: An Analysis of Drought Exposure, Impacts, and Adaptation in the South Central U.S. Developing Effective Drought Monitoring Tools for Farmers and Ranchers in the South Central U.S. Development of the Climate Registry for the Assessment of Vulnerability (CRAVe): A Searchable, Public Online Tool for Understanding Species and Habitat Vulnerability Forecasting Future Changes in Sagebrush Distribution and Abundance Climate Change Adaptation for Coastal National Wildlife Refuges Support for the Seventh Annual Northwest Climate Conference Integrating Climate Change Research and Planning to Inform Wildlife Conservation in the Boreal Forests of the Northeastern U.S. Refining Guidance for Incorporating Climate Science and Scenario Planning into National Park Service Resource Stewardship Strategies View of right wall showing shale formation where geologic section was taken about one and one-half miles above Lava Canyon. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1923. Upstream view of the Granite Gorge in the Grand Canyon. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1923. Downstream view of the Granite Gorge of the Grand Canyon from point on left bank at mouth of Mineral Canyon. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1923. Time to Restore: Using a Community Based Approach to Identify Key Plant Species for Pollinator Restoration Arizona Bureau of Mines Mining Files Collection Inventory Refining Guidance for Incorporating Climate Science and Scenario Planning into National Park Service Resource Stewardship Strategies Climate Change Adaptation for Coastal National Wildlife Refuges Integrating Climate Change Research and Planning to Inform Wildlife Conservation in the Boreal Forests of the Northeastern U.S. View of right wall showing shale formation where geologic section was taken about one and one-half miles above Lava Canyon. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1923. Upstream view of the Granite Gorge in the Grand Canyon. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1923. Downstream view of the Granite Gorge of the Grand Canyon from point on left bank at mouth of Mineral Canyon. Grand Canyon National Park, Coconino County, Arizona. 1923. Establishing Climate Change Vulnerability Rankings for Hawaiian Native Plants The Impacts of Glacier Change on the Jago, Okpilak, and Hulahula Rivers in the Arctic Arizona Bureau of Mines Mining Files Collection Inventory Modeling and Projecting the Influence of Climate Change on Texas Surface Waters and their Aquatic Biotic Communities Support for the Seventh Annual Northwest Climate Conference Forecasting Future Changes in Sagebrush Distribution and Abundance Improving Representation of Extreme Precipitation Events in Regional Climate Models Community Resilience to Drought Hazard: An Analysis of Drought Exposure, Impacts, and Adaptation in the South Central U.S. Time to Restore: Using a Community Based Approach to Identify Key Plant Species for Pollinator Restoration Using a Collaborative Modeling Approach to Explore Climate and Landscape Change in the Northern Rockies and Inform Adaptive Management Developing Effective Drought Monitoring Tools for Farmers and Ranchers in the South Central U.S. Assessing the Vulnerability of Vegetation to Future Climate in the North Central U.S. Pulling small canoe through riffles. Yukon region, Alaska. circa 1901. Development of the Climate Registry for the Assessment of Vulnerability (CRAVe): A Searchable, Public Online Tool for Understanding Species and Habitat Vulnerability