Skip to main content
Advanced Search

Filters: Categories: Publication (X) > partyWithName: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (X)

61 results (8ms)   

Filters
Date Range
Extensions
Types
Contacts
Categories
Tag Types
Tag Schemes
View Results as: JSON ATOM CSV
Pacific lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus are declining in the Columbia River Basin and larval lamprey use of large, mainstem river habitats is unknown. Their use of shallow depositional areas associated with tributary inputs is equally unknown. We used a deepwater electrofisher to explore occupancy, detection, and habitat use of larval Pacific lamprey and Lampetra spp. in the lower reaches and mouths of the Klickitat, White Salmon, and Wind rivers, tributaries to Bonneville Reservoir and the Columbia River. We repeated similar work conducted in 2011. Specifically, sampling in 2011 in the White Salmon River and mouth took place prior to the breach of Condit Dam and subsequent release of sediments from Northwestern...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation
Yukon River Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha are described as having "stream-type" life histories. After emergence from river gravel, juvenile Chinook salmon feed and grow in tributary streams of the Yukon River throughout their first summer, overwinter in freshwater, and usually leave rearing areas for marine waters during the second spring/summer. Previous life history and distribution studies have shown that some age-0 Chinook salmon leave their natal streams and colonize downriver, nonnatal habitats for rearing and overwintering. A pilot study in 2006–2007 documented rearing of Canadian-origin Chinook salmon in downstream U.S. waters. A comprehensive three-year distribution study was funded by the Alaska...
Categories: Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: M1-Fish
thumbnail
Description: The upper Gila River in New Mexico is one of the few unobstructed rivers in the Colorado River Basin with largely intact native fish populations, including four federally listed and one state listed species.Freshwater systems throughout the West continue to be threatened by human encroachment and water development. Methodologies or decision support tools to evaluate resource management practices that foster an understanding of how fish species adapt to the effects of climate change are critical to future resource management planning.
Kanuti National Wildlife Refuge was established to conserve white-fronted geese, other waterfowl and migratory birds, moose, caribou, and furbearers; to fulfill treaty obligations; to provide for continued subsistence uses; and to ensure necessary water quality and quantity. Because the refuge is seldom visited by anyone other than subsistence users from the immediate area, those who do venture into Kanuti's backcountry will find unspoiled and virtually unused wildlands to rival those anywhere else in the world. These lands support a wide variety of wildlife. In addition to the large mammals mentioned above, wolverine, fox, porcupine, lynx, beavers, muskrats, marten and mink can be seen, as well as nearly 130 species...
In a remote corner of northwestern Alaska lies Selawik Refuge, a special place of extreme climate, free-flowing rivers, and abundant wildlife. Here where the boreal forest of Interior Alaska meets the arctic tundra, thousands of waterfowl, shorebirds, fish, insects and other creatures rest, breed and feed in the vast wetlands complex that is the heart of the Selawik Refuge. Here also is the homeland of the Iñupiat, where local people hunt, fish and gather as their ancestors have done for thousands of years. Over two million acres of land make up the refuge, which straddles the Arctic Circle and offers adventure and rejuvenation for visitors.
thumbnail
PURPOSE: The exchange of lands between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and Doyon, Limited is proposed to enhance the Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge of Alaska. Doyon is the largest private landowner in the refuge and an Alaska Native regional corporation that has been interested in acquiring federal oil and gas interests since the refuge was established in 1980. Under the terms of an agreement in principle between the FWS and Doyon, the U.S. government would receive fee title to lease 150,000 acres of Doyon lands, including both surface and subsurface rights, with priority fish and wildlife habitats that can be incorporated into the refuge. Doyon would receive fee title to 110,000 acres of refuge lands,...
We evaluated the biogeomorphic processes of a large (309 ha) tidal salt marsh and examined factors that influence its ability to keep pace with relative sea-level rise (SLR). Detailed elevation data from 1995 and 2008 were compared with digital elevation models (DEMs) to assess marsh surface elevation change during this time. Overall, 37 % (113 ha) of the marsh increased in elevation at a rate that exceeded SLR, whereas 63 % (196 ha) of the area did not keep pace with SLR. Of the total area, 55 % (169 ha) subsided during the study period, but subsidence varied spatially across the marsh surface. To determine which biogeomorphic and spatial factors contributed to measured elevation change, we collected soil cores...
Understanding recent biogeographic responses to climate change is fundamental for improving our predictions of likely future responses and guiding conservation planning at both local and global scales. Studies of observed biogeographic responses to 20th century climate change have principally examined effects related to ubiquitous increases in temperature – collectively termed a warming fingerprint. Although the importance of changes in other aspects of climate – particularly precipitation and water availability – is widely acknowledged from a theoretical standpoint and supported by paleontological evidence, we lack a practical understanding of how these changes interact with temperature to drive biogeographic responses....
Kanuti National Wildlife Refuge was established to conserve white-fronted geese, other waterfowl and migratory birds, moose, caribou, and furbearers; to fulfill treaty obligations; to provide for continued subsistence uses; and to ensure necessary water quality and quantity. Because the refuge is seldom visited by anyone other than subsistence users from the immediate area, those who do venture into Kanuti's backcountry will find unspoiled and virtually unused wildlands to rival those anywhere else in the world. These lands support a wide variety of wildlife. In addition to the large mammals mentioned above, wolverine, fox, porcupine, lynx, beavers, muskrats, marten and mink can be seen, as well as nearly 130 species...
In a remote corner of northwestern Alaska lies Selawik Refuge, a special place of extreme climate, free-flowing rivers, and abundant wildlife. Here where the boreal forest of Interior Alaska meets the arctic tundra, thousands of waterfowl, shorebirds, fish, insects and other creatures rest, breed and feed in the vast wetlands complex that is the heart of the Selawik Refuge. Here also is the homeland of the Iñupiat, where local people hunt, fish and gather as their ancestors have done for thousands of years. Over two million acres of land make up the refuge, which straddles the Arctic Circle and offers adventure and rejuvenation for visitors.
PURPOSE: The exchange of lands between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and Doyon, Limited is proposed to enhance the Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge of Alaska. Doyon is the largest private landowner in the refuge and an Alaska Native regional corporation that has been interested in acquiring federal oil and gas interests since the refuge was established in 1980. Under the terms of an agreement in principle between the FWS and Doyon, the U.S. government would receive fee title to lease 150,000 acres of Doyon lands, including both surface and subsurface rights, with priority fish and wildlife habitats that can be incorporated into the refuge. Doyon would receive fee title to 110,000 acres of refuge lands,...
thumbnail
Habitat loss and fragmentation are widely recognized as among the most important threats to global biodiversity. New analytical approaches are providing improved ability to predict the effects of landscape change on population connectivity at vast spatial extents. This paper presents an analysis of population connectivity for three species of conservation concern [swift fox (Vulpes velox); lesser prairie-chicken (Tympanuchus pallidicinctus); massasuaga (Sistrurus catenatus)] across the American Great Plains region. We used factorial least-cost path and resistant kernel analyses to predict effects of landscape conditions on corridor network connectivity. Our predictions of population connectivity provide testable...
Categories: Data, Project, Publication; Types: Citation, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, OGC WMS Service; Tags: 2010, CO-01, CO-02, CO-03, CO-04, All tags...
In a remote corner of northwestern Alaska lies Selawik Refuge, a special place of extreme climate, free-flowing rivers, and abundant wildlife. Here where the boreal forest of Interior Alaska meets the arctic tundra, thousands of waterfowl, shorebirds, fish, insects and other creatures rest, breed and feed in the vast wetlands complex that is the heart of the Selawik Refuge. Here also is the homeland of the Iñupiat, where local people hunt, fish and gather as their ancestors have done for thousands of years. Over two million acres of land make up the refuge, which straddles the Arctic Circle and offers adventure and rejuvenation for visitors.
The tundra biome is the dominant terrestrial ecosystem of the circumpolar north, and its fate in a rapidly changing climate is of high scientific and socioeconomic concern. One of those concerns is that the majority of caribou herds throughout the circumpolar north are declining, perhaps as a result of climate change. The principal objective of this research is to reveal the connections between soil nutrient cycling, forage quality and caribou habitat selection. This framework is underpinned by the concept that tundra ecosystem productivity is ultimately driven by the thermodynamics of the system induced by climate.
Categories: Data, Publication; Types: Citation; Tags: ALPINE/TUNDRA, ALPINE/TUNDRA, CARBON, CARBON, CARBON CYCLE/CARBON BUDGET MODELS, All tags...
Coastal areas are high-risk zones subject to the impacts of global climate change, with significant increases in the frequencies of extreme weather and storm events, and sea-level rise forecast by 2100. These physical processes are expected to alter estuaries, resulting in loss of intertidal wetlands and their component wildlife species. In particular, impacts to salt marshes and their wildlife will vary both temporally and spatially and may be irreversible and severe. Synergistic effects caused by combining stressors with anthropogenic land-use patterns could create areas of significant biodiversity loss and extinction, especially in urbanized estuaries that are already heavily degraded. In this paper, we discuss...
We conducted detailed resurveys of a montane mammal, Urocitellus beldingi, to examine the effects of climate change on persistence along the trailing edge of its range. Of 74 California sites where U. beldingi were historically recorded (1902–1966), 42 per cent were extirpated, with no evidence for colonization of previously unoccupied sites. Increases in both precipitation and temperature predicted site extirpations, potentially owing to snowcover loss. Surprisingly, human land-use change buffered climate change impacts, leading to increased persistence and abundance. Excluding human-modified sites, U. beldingi has shown an upslope range retraction of 255 m. Generalized additive models of past distribution were...
PURPOSE: The implementation of a revised comprehensive conservation plan for the Kodiak National Wildlife of Alaska is proposed. The plan would replace the management plan adopted in 1987 and guide management of the refuge for the next 15 years. One of the 16 national refuges in Alaska, Kodiak Refuge encompasses 1.6 million acres of lands and waters on the Kodiak Archipelago. More specifically, the refuge includes the southwestern two-thirds of Kodiak Island all of Uganik Island, and 54,000 acres on Afognak and Ban islands. The refuge i9s rich in cultural and biological resources. Three levels of management direction are addressed with respect to conservation direction, specifically, regional management for all...
In a remote corner of northwestern Alaska lies Selawik Refuge, a special place of extreme climate, free-flowing rivers, and abundant wildlife. Here where the boreal forest of Interior Alaska meets the arctic tundra, thousands of waterfowl, shorebirds, fish, insects and other creatures rest, breed and feed in the vast wetlands complex that is the heart of the Selawik Refuge. Here also is the homeland of the Iñupiat, where local people hunt, fish and gather as their ancestors have done for thousands of years. Over two million acres of land make up the refuge, which straddles the Arctic Circle and offers adventure and rejuvenation for visitors.


map background search result map search result map Climate change and connectivity: Assessing landscape and species vulnerability Kenai National Wildlife Refuge contaminant assessment Moose population survey, western Yukon Flats: Game Management Unit 25D, Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge, March 8-11, 2004 Proposed Land Exchange Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge Final Environmental Impact Statement. Summary Science Brief for Resource Managers: Metacommunity Dynamics of Gila River Fishes Kenai National Wildlife Refuge contaminant assessment Science Brief for Resource Managers: Metacommunity Dynamics of Gila River Fishes Proposed Land Exchange Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge Final Environmental Impact Statement. Summary Moose population survey, western Yukon Flats: Game Management Unit 25D, Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge, March 8-11, 2004 Climate change and connectivity: Assessing landscape and species vulnerability