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The Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management launched the Shoreline Change Project in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the coast. The shoreline position and change rate are used to inform management decisions regarding the erosion of coastal resources. In 2001, a shoreline from 1994 was added to calculate both long- and short-term shoreline change rates along ocean-facing sections of the Massachusetts coast. In 2013, two oceanfront shorelines for Massachusetts were added using 2008-9 color aerial orthoimagery and 2007 topographic lidar datasets obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Ocean Service, Coastal Services Center. This 2018 data release includes rates that incorporate...
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The Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management launched the Shoreline Change Project in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the coast. The shoreline position and change rate are used to inform management decisions regarding the erosion of coastal resources. In 2001, a shoreline from 1994 was added to calculate both long- and short-term shoreline change rates along ocean-facing sections of the Massachusetts coast. In 2013, two oceanfront shorelines for Massachusetts were added using 2008-9 color aerial orthoimagery and 2007 topographic lidar datasets obtained from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Ocean Service, Coastal Services Center. This 2018 data release includes rates that incorporate...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled national shoreline data for more than 20 years to document coastal change and serve the needs of research, management, and the public. Maintaining a record of historical shoreline positions is an effective method to monitor national shoreline evolution over time, enabling scientists to identify areas most susceptible to erosion or accretion. These data can help coastal managers and planners understand which areas of the coast are vulnerable to change. This data release includes a compilation of previously published historical shoreline positions for Virginia spanning 148 years (1849-1997), and two new mean high water (MHW) shorelines extracted from lidar data collected...
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The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management compiled Massachusetts vector shorelines into an updated dataset for the Office’s Shoreline Change Project. The Shoreline Change Project started in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the Massachusetts coast by compiling a database of historical shoreline positions. Trends of shoreline position over long- and short-term timescales provide information to landowners, managers, and potential buyers about possible future changes to costal resources and infrastructure. This updated dataset strengthens the understanding of shoreline position change in Massachusetts. It includes U.S. Geological Survey vector shorelines...
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During Hurricane Irma, Florida and Georgia experienced substantial impacts to beaches, dunes, barrier islands, and coral reefs. Extensive erosion and coral losses from hurricanes result in increased vulnerability of coastal regions, including densely populated areas. Erosion may put critical infrastructure at risk of future flooding and may cause economic loss. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Hazards Resources Program is working to assess shoreline erosion along the southeast U.S. coastline and analyze its implications for future vulnerability.
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled national shoreline data for more than 20 years to document coastal change and serve the needs of research, management, and the public. Maintaining a record of historical shoreline positions is an effective method to monitor national shoreline evolution over time, enabling scientists to identify areas most susceptible to erosion or accretion. These data can help coastal managers and planners understand which areas of the coast are vulnerable to change. This data release includes a compilation of previously published historical shoreline positions for Virginia spanning 148 years (1849-1997), and two new mean high water (MHW) shorelines extracted from lidar data collected...
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During Hurricane Irma in September 2017, Florida and Georgia experienced significant impacts to beaches, dunes, barrier islands, and coral reefs. Extensive erosion and coral losses result in increased immediate and long-term hazards to shorelines that include densely populated regions. These hazards put critical infrastructure at risk to future flooding and erosion and may cause economic losses. The USGS Coastal and Marine Hazards Resources Program (CMHRP) is assessing hurricane-induced coastal erosion along the southeast US coastline and implications for vulnerability to future storms. Shoreline positions were compiled prior to and following Hurricane Irma along the sandy shorelines of the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic...
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These datasets provide early estimates of 2024 fractional cover for exotic annual grass (EAG) species and one native perennial grass species on a weekly basis from April to late June. Typically, the EAG estimates are publicly released within 7-13 days of the latest satellite observation used for that version. Each weekly release contains five fractional cover maps along with their corresponding confidence maps for: 1) a group of 16 species of EAGs, 2) cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum); 3) Field Brome (Bromus arvensis); 4) medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae); and 5) Sandberg bluegrass (Poa secunda). These datasets were generated leveraging field observations from Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Assessment, Inventory,...
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These datasets provide early estimates of 2024 fractional cover for exotic annual grass (EAG) species and one native perennial grass species on a weekly basis from April to late June. Typically, the EAG estimates are publicly released within 7-13 days of the latest satellite observation used for that version. Each weekly release contains five fractional cover maps along with their corresponding confidence maps for: 1) a group of 16 species of EAGs, 2) cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum); 3) Field Brome (Bromus arvensis); 4) medusahead (Taeniatherum caput-medusae); and 5) Sandberg bluegrass (Poa secunda). These datasets were generated leveraging field observations from Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Assessment, Inventory,...
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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project, documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal change. Shoreline position is an easily understood...
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The natural resiliency of the New Jersey barrier island system, and the efficacy of management efforts to reduce vulnerability, depends on the ability of the system to recover and maintain equilibrium in response to storms and persistent coastal change. This resiliency is largely dependent on the availability of sand in the beach system. In an effort to better understand the system's sand budget and processes in which this system evolves, high-resolution geophysical mapping of the sea floor in Little Egg Inlet and along the southern end of Long Beach Island near Beach Haven, New Jersey was conducted from May 31 to June 10, 2018, followed by a sea floor sampling survey conducted from October 22 to 23, 2018, as part...
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The natural resiliency of the New Jersey barrier island system, and the efficacy of management efforts to reduce vulnerability, depends on the ability of the system to recover and maintain equilibrium in response to storms and persistent coastal change. This resiliency is largely dependent on the availability of sand in the beach system. In an effort to better understand the system's sand budget and processes in which this system evolves, high-resolution geophysical mapping of the sea floor in Little Egg Inlet and along the southern end of Long Beach Island near Beach Haven, New Jersey was conducted from May 31 to June 10, 2018, followed by a sea floor sampling survey conducted from October 22 to 23, 2018, as part...
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The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled national shoreline data for more than 20 years to document coastal change and serve the needs of research, management, and the public. Maintaining a record of historical shoreline positions is an effective method to monitor national shoreline evolution over time, enabling scientists to identify areas most susceptible to erosion or accretion. These data can help coastal managers and planners understand which areas of the coast are vulnerable to change. This data release includes a compilation of previously published historical shoreline positions for Virginia spanning 148 years (1849-1997), and two new mean high water (MHW) shorelines extracted from lidar data collected...
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The Sandy Hook artificial reef, located on the sea floor offshore of Sandy Hook, New Jersey was built to create habitat for marine life. The reef was created by the placement of heavy materials on the sea floor; ninety-five percent of the material in the Sandy Hook reef is rock. In 2000, the U.S. Geological Survey surveyed the area using a Simrad EM1000 multibeam echosounder mounted on the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) ship Frederick G. Creed. The purpose of this multibeam survey, done in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers when the Creed was in the New York region in April 2000, was to map the bathymetry and backscatter intensity of the sea floor in the area of the Sandy Hook artificial reef. The collected...
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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project (http://coastal.er.usgs.gov/shoreline-change/), documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal...
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Marine geophysical mapping of the Queen Charlotte Fault in the eastern Gulf of Alaska was conducted in 2016 as part of a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Alaska Department of Fish and Game to understand the morphology and subsurface geology of the entire Queen Charlotte system. The Queen Charlotte fault is the offshore portion of the Queen Charlotte-Fairweather Fault: a major structural feature that extends more than 1,200 kilometers from the Fairweather Range of southern Alaska to northern Vancouver Island, Canada. The data published in this data release were collected along the Queen Charlotte Fault between Cross Sound and Noyes Canyon, offshore southeastern Alaska from May 18 to...
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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project, documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal change. Shoreline position is an easily understood...
Categories: Data; Types: Citation, Downloadable, Map Service, OGC WFS Layer, OGC WMS Layer, Shapefile; Tags: Bald Point State Park, CMGP, Coastal and Marine Geology Program, DSAS, Digital Shoreline Analysis System, All tags...
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Sandy ocean beaches in the United States are popular tourist and recreational destinations and constitute some of the most valuable real estate in the country. The boundary between land and water along the coastline is often the location of concentrated residential and commercial development and is frequently exposed to a range of natural hazards, which include flooding, storm effects, and coastal erosion. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a national assessment of coastal change hazards. One component of this research effort, the National Assessment of Shoreline Change Project, documents changes in shoreline position as a proxy for coastal change. Shoreline position is an easily understood...
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The Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management launched the Shoreline Change Project in 1989 to identify erosion-prone areas of the coast by compiling a database of historical (mid 1800's-1989) shoreline positions. Trends of shoreline position over long and short-term timescales provide information to landowners, managers, and potential buyers about possible future impacts to coastal resources and infrastructure. In 2001, a 1994 shoreline was added to calculate both long- and short-term shoreline change rates along ocean-facing sections of the Massachusetts coast. In 2013, two oceanfront shorelines for Massachusetts were added using 2008-2009 color aerial orthoimagery and 2007 topographic lidar datasets obtained...
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Understanding how sea-level rise will affect coastal landforms and the species and habitats they support is critical for crafting approaches that balance the needs of humans and native species. Given this increasing need to forecast sea-level rise effects on barrier islands in the near and long terms, we are developing Bayesian networks to evaluate and to forecast the cascading effects of sea-level rise on shoreline change, barrier island state, and piping plover habitat availability. We use publicly available data products, such as lidar, orthophotography, and geomorphic feature sets derived from those, to extract metrics of barrier island characteristics at consistent sampling distances. The metrics are then incorporated...


map background search result map search result map Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for Louisiana Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term End Point Rate Calculations for Louisiana Shorelines of the Florida north (FLnorth) coastal region used in shoreline change analysis Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term End Point Rate Calculations for central North Carolina (NCcentral) GeoTIFF image of the backscatter intensity of the sea floor of the Sandy Hook artificial reef (2-m resolution, Mercator, WGS 84) Intersects for Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Intersects for the Buzzards Bay coastal region in Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 SupClas, GeoSet, SubType, VegDen, VegType: Categorical landcover rasters (landcover, geomorphic setting, substrate type, vegetation density, and vegetation type): Rockaway Peninsula, NY, 2010–2011 Multibeam bathymetric data collected in the eastern Gulf of Alaska during USGS Field Activity 2016-625-FA using a Reson 7160 multibeam echosounder (10 meter resolution, 32-bit GeoTIFF, UTM 8 WGS 84, WGS 84 Ellipsoid) Chirp seismic reflection data from the Edgetech 512i collected in Little Egg Inlet and offshore the southern end of Long Beach Island, NJ, during USGS field activity 2018-001-FA (shotpoints point shapefile, survey trackline shapefile, PNG profile images, and SEG-Y trace data). Multibeam Echosounder, Reson T-20P tracklines collected in Little Egg Inlet and offshore the southern end of Long Beach Island, NJ, during USGS Field Activity 2018-001-FA (Esri polyline shapefile, GCS WGS 84) Historical shoreline positions for the coast of MA, from 1844 - 2014 Baselines for Outer Cape Cod, Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Uncertainty of forecasted shoreline positions for Florida and Georgia Intersects for the Florida east coast (FLec) coastal region generated to calculate short-term shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5 A GIS compilation of vector shorelines for the Virginia coastal region from the 1840s to 2010s Long-term shoreline change rates for the Virginia coastal region, calculated with and without the proxy-datum bias using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Intersects for coastal region of Virginia generated to calculate short-term shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Early Estimates of Exotic Annual Grass (EAG) in the Sagebrush Biome, USA, 2024 (ver. 2.0, April 2024) Early Estimates of Exotic Annual Grass (EAG) in the Sagebrush Biome, USA, 2024 (ver. 7.0, May 2024) Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term End Point Rate Calculations for central North Carolina (NCcentral) GeoTIFF image of the backscatter intensity of the sea floor of the Sandy Hook artificial reef (2-m resolution, Mercator, WGS 84) Chirp seismic reflection data from the Edgetech 512i collected in Little Egg Inlet and offshore the southern end of Long Beach Island, NJ, during USGS field activity 2018-001-FA (shotpoints point shapefile, survey trackline shapefile, PNG profile images, and SEG-Y trace data). Multibeam Echosounder, Reson T-20P tracklines collected in Little Egg Inlet and offshore the southern end of Long Beach Island, NJ, during USGS Field Activity 2018-001-FA (Esri polyline shapefile, GCS WGS 84) Intersects for Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Intersects for the Buzzards Bay coastal region in Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.0 Baselines for Outer Cape Cod, Massachusetts, generated to calculate shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Intersects for coastal region of Virginia generated to calculate short-term shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 Long-term shoreline change rates for the Virginia coastal region, calculated with and without the proxy-datum bias using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5.1 A GIS compilation of vector shorelines for the Virginia coastal region from the 1840s to 2010s Historical shoreline positions for the coast of MA, from 1844 - 2014 Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term End Point Rate Calculations for Louisiana Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for Louisiana Shorelines of the Florida north (FLnorth) coastal region used in shoreline change analysis Intersects for the Florida east coast (FLec) coastal region generated to calculate short-term shoreline change rates using the Digital Shoreline Analysis System version 5 Multibeam bathymetric data collected in the eastern Gulf of Alaska during USGS Field Activity 2016-625-FA using a Reson 7160 multibeam echosounder (10 meter resolution, 32-bit GeoTIFF, UTM 8 WGS 84, WGS 84 Ellipsoid) Uncertainty of forecasted shoreline positions for Florida and Georgia Early Estimates of Exotic Annual Grass (EAG) in the Sagebrush Biome, USA, 2024 (ver. 2.0, April 2024) Early Estimates of Exotic Annual Grass (EAG) in the Sagebrush Biome, USA, 2024 (ver. 7.0, May 2024)